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Wednesday, September 2, 2015

LAMPREA WITH 14TH CENTURY CRISPY HOT TURNOVER RECIPE

bookscorpion
Photo from: Estteben Locschbor
L. Petromyzon marinus, Eng. lamprey. Literally, ‘lic-rock’ for their habit of clinging to rocks with their mouths (L. lambere, to lick and petra, rock). These are eel like parasites that are funnel shaped, jawless and sucking. They live in the Atlantic, the Mediterranean and in fresh water.

The entire area of what is today Zamora, which formerly belonged to the Dioceses of Astorga, is called “lamprey land” for its enormous pools filled with lampreys. There were so much that the even the monks from of Sahagún (León) frequently ate them as well as nobles.

Sent Soví Chapters CLXXX-XII instruct that all big fish skin eels: lamprey and moray eels should be scalded in hot water; lamprey must be singed and scorched.
CXXXVIIII indicates that lamprey can be added to pies, turnovers or casseroles or cooked on a spit.

[Alonso Luengo. 1994:50; Santanach. 2008:138-139 and Villena/Calero. 2002:23a]

LAMPREY TURNOVERS ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ CXXXVIIII QUI PARLA CON SE FFA PANADES DE LEMPRESA, HO METRE EN AST HO EN CASOLA 



Ingredients

Frying Onion and Lamprey
Photo by: Lord-Williams
turnover dough
12 lamprey[1]


oil for frying
1 small onion, thinly sliced
¼ wine
¼ vinegar
spices - ¼ tsp ea ground :
     white pepper
     nutmeg
     galanger
3 cloves
salt to tastet
½ garlic clove sliced

½ slice of bread 
1 egg slightly beaten

Crispy Hot Lamprey Turnovers
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Prepare turnover dough. 

Bleed a lamprey by making an incision between the neck and the head. Save the blood. Wash it. Cut off the extremities and scald it for one minute in boiling water.

Heat olive oil and gently fry the onion. Add wine and vinegar. Gently oil to reduce the liquid. Add the lamprey, the spices and salt to taste.

Mash the bread in a mortar with the blood and add that to the frying pan. Add garlic if desired. 

When the mixture is half cooked remove from the frying pan and fill the turnovers. Paint the dough with raw egg and seal the edges closed with the tip of a spoon.

Fry the turnovers and serve warm.

[1] 1 conger eel was used as lamprey were not available.




Monday, August 31, 2015

LAGUNA, ANDRES, 1489-1559

A Painting of Andrés Laguna
in the National Royal Academy of Medicine
He was a physician who was born in Segovia. His father was a converted Jewish doctor. Andrés Laguna studied at the University of Salamanca for two years and then went to Paris where he became so fluent in Greek and Latin that he read Dioscorides in the original language. In 1530 he graduated in fine arts and medicine in Paris, returning to the Spain in 1536 where he taught at the University of Alcalá.

He traveled to England, lived for a while in Holland, collecting herbs to verify Dioscorides prescriptions.  From 1540-1545, he resided in Metz, Germany. There he was hired as a physician of the city. From 1545-1554 he lived in Rome where he received various honors from Popes Peter III and Julius III. He spent time in the home of Ambassador Diego Hurtado de Mendoza, in Venice, who was a known humanist and owned of one of the best libraries in Europe of his time. After living in Holland again for three years, Laguna returned to Spain where he created the Botanical Garden of Aranjuez. It is thought that he died in Guadalajara in 1559. He is buried in the church of San Miguel, in Segovia.

An Aloe Leaf
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Laguna published various works on medicine, among other subjects, including commentaries on Medical Materia by Dioscorides after testing herbal descriptions and therapeutic properties of the latter in Europe and on the Mediterranean coast. It proved to be a valuable work through the end of the 18th C. Laguna continued the theory of the four elements but refused to accept witchcraft or quacks. See col forrajera. [Castro. Alimentación.1996:242; ES: Fresquet. “Andrés.” Mar 25, 02]  

 A WAY OF MAKING ALOE SYRUP ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF AL-ANDALUS #490 JARABE DE MADERA DE ÁLOE, RECETA DE SU HECHURA, p 269

Ingredients
 ¼ oz/28.35 . ea:

cinnamon
cloves
cassia
lavender
nutmeg
            mastic seeds
1 tbsp mashed saffron
Soaking Gel to Remove Sap
Photo by: Lord-Williams
4 c rose water
oz musk[1]
1 aloe leaf


Preparation

Put the spices in a bag. Put this in a pot with sugar and rosewater. Dissolve the saffron with a little rosewater and add it to the pot. 

Bring to a boil. Boil gently until the sugar has dissolved and a syrup is formed. Remove from heat. Grind the spices in the spice bag. Add 1 tsp or more, according to taste, of the spices to the syrup and set aside.  

Wash an aloe leaf. Cut off both ends. Remove spine on both sides and put the leave in water for 5 minutes to help eliminate the yellow sap from the gel inside the leaf.

Aloe Syrup
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Remove the leaf from water, Take a blunt knife and remove the green outer coat of the leaf. Dip the leaf in pitcher with clean water to remove as much sap as possible.

Put the aloe in a blender with the syrup. Turn the blender on low for 5 seconds and then high for 5 seconds. Drink 2 tbsp of the liquid mixed with 1/4 c hot water.

The benefits: it fortifies the stomach, liver and other organs; it cheers the heart and tempers the complexion and is beneficial in the beginning stages of dropsy.

Although the recipe is much older than Laguna, this is the type of recipe he could have prescribed.




[1] Musk was not used as it was not available. Further, it is very expensive.


#490 JARABE DE MADERA DE ÁLOE, RECETA DE SU HECHURA, p 269

Friday, August 28, 2015

LAGAR WITH 15TH C RECIPE FOR QUINCE SAUCE

Lagar de Varas
Photo from: Eduardo Estéllez
lagareta, screw press; worm press; wine press. The king of León in the 11th C possessed one to press the grapes from his vineyards. For parts of the screw press see huso, viga de contrapeso de cantos and virxes . [Llamas. 1994:168; and Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:115:124:138:ftn 124]

QUINCE SAUCE COOKED IN THE POT ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S liii-4 MEMBRILLOS COCIDOS EN OLLA

Ingredients

Boiling Quince in Wine
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 l. wine
1 lb quinces
½ c peeled almonds
1 whole cinnamon tube
1 tsp cloves
1 tsp nutmeg
½ tsp mace
½ tsp grains of paradise
1 ½ c sugar

Garnish:
2 tsp sugar
1 tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp cloves

Preparation

Boil peeled almonds in the wine. Strain the almonds and grind them in a food
Quince Sauce
Photo by: Lord-Williams
processor. Return them to the pot with the wine. Add quinces. Place spices in a bag and add them. Add sugar. Cover and cook until the quinces are soft. Remove them and peel them. Remove the core.


Put the quinces in a food processor and mash them. Return them to the pot and cook 5 more minutes.  Taste for sweetness. Add more sugar if necessary. Cook until the sugar is dissolved. Put the sauce in a dish and garnish with sugar and ground cinnamon and cloves.