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Friday, January 20, 2017

PASTEL EN BOTE, NOLA'S YUMMY LAMB PIE FILLING, WITHOUT THE CRUST

Browning Ground Lamb
Photo by: Lord-Williams
pot filling. This is a meat-pie filling, which is cooked in a pot, rather than baked in a crust. It has no crust. [Nola. 1989:xlviii-4]

A POT OF MEAT PIE FILING ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S xlviii-4 PASTEL EN BOTE

Ingredients

1 lb meat from a leg of lamb
lamb fat
1 c meat broth[1]

½ tsp saffron
½ tsp pepper
½ tsp ground cloves
½ c  breadcrumbs
1 c  grated cheese

Preparation

Lamb and Cheese
An Ideal Combination
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Remove the fat from a leg of lamb.

Cut meat off the leg of lamb. Grind it.

Chop half the fat from the leg[2]
and grind it with the meat.

Melt the fat that has not been ground in a pot. When crisp, remove and discard. Add the meat combined with fat. Cook well, breaking it up and turning to cook all sides.

Add saffron mashed and dissolved in a little broth, white pepper, cloves and the rest of the broth. Cook a little. Add breadcrumbs. Mix well. Add grated cheese. Stir it into the mixture. Cook until melts. Remove from heat and serve.


[1] The Medieval Spanish Chef’s addition.
[2] ES: Nola/Brighid posted 2001 translates this as “bacon” but bacon is defined as “cured meat from the back or sides of a pig.” It seems saver to say that lamb fat is used in this case.


NOLA’S xlviii-4


 

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

PASCUA WITH DELICIOUS "BADLY COOKED" MILK PUDDING!

Heb. Pesach, Eng passover, the passing. In Spanish, it refers to Christmas (Las Pascuas de Navidad) , Easter (Pascua), Pentecost (Pascua de la Florida, Pascua de la Resurrección or La Pascua del Espíritu Santo), which takes place seven weeks after Easter Sunday, or the Grape Harvest Festival (Pascua de los al-Asir), which is celebrated between the saint’s day of St. Augustine, August 28th (see vendimia). It was an Arab outdoor celebration, dancing and music, zambras (popular songs) accompanied by lute, tambourine and Walladh, (popular dance, predecessor of the popular Andalusian dancing called OlÈs), castanets, guitars and percussion instruments to accompany Zegeles and Moaxajas (types of popular rhythmatic couplets). In all three religions there were festivities the first half of September celebrating the harvest or the moon but they could be anywhere from the saint's day of St. Augustine, August 28th to Michaelmas on the 28th of  September when there is a full moon. 

[Benavides-Barajas. Alhambra. 1999:55 and Castro. Alimentación. 1996:103:269:276 etc]

See blog titled "Leche mal cocida," published October 23, 2015, for a delicious variation of the same recipe.
  
 BADLY COOKED MILK ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S xxxi-4 LECHE MAL COCIDA[1]

Ingredients

"Badly Cooked" - Nothing, a splendid pudding!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 c almonds
1 slice of crustless bread
¼ c rosewater
1 qt chicken broth[2]
4 egg yolks

Garnish:


½ tsp cinnamon
1 tsp sugar
mint leaves (optional)

Preparation

Blanch almonds in boiling water. Remove skins and grind in a food grinder with a crustless slice of bread soaked in rosewater. Add broth and bend well. Strain through a cheese cloth into a pot. 

Bring to a boil. Remove from heat and add beaten egg yolks. Stir four times and pour the mixture until dessert bowls. Rosewater is always good in many dishes.

Garnish with a mixture of sugar and cinnamon.


[1] Recipes with eggs denoted celebrations especially following Lent when animals were procreating and it was prohibited to eat meat and animal products including milk and eggs. Easter was celebrated with egg dishes. In spite of the title, this recipe could have been used on Easter Sunday.
[2] It is assumed that broth is needed to make almond milk.

NOLA’S xxxi-4


Monday, January 16, 2017

PASAR WITH NOLA'S THIRD CORIANDER PUDDING RECIPE

OCast passar, Eng to extend, hang, open, strain a liquid through a cloth, clarify or separate thick
substances from a liquid. Nola frequently uses the Old Castellan word, especially for straining
liquids. [Nola. 1989:xii-3:xiii-3.xiiii-1 etc]

Strain Through A Cloth
Photo by: Lord-Williams

NOLA'S THIRD CORIANDER PUDDING RECIPE ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S 
xix-3 OTRO POTAJE DE CULANTRO 
Ingredients

1 bunch of fresh coriander
1 punch of dried coriander
1 c peeled and toasted almonds
1 c toasted hazelnuts
1 slice of bread[1]

¼ c white vinegar
1 qt  broth
1 tsp fine spices
½ tsp saffron mashed and dissolved
¼ c  sugar
The Third Coriander Pudding Recipe
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Garnish
1 tsp sugar
½ tsp ground cinnamon
Preparation

Chop fresh green and dried 
coriander in a food processor.
Add peeled and toasted almonds.

Chop well. Remove. Add 
hazelnuts and grind. Add chopped
almonds. Chop the two nuts
together. Add a slice of bread
soaked in vinegar.

Add broth and strain through a 
woolen cloth. Put the broth in a
pot. Add spices with saffron
and sugar. Cook until it begins
to thicken. Remove from heat
and pour into individual dessert
bowls.

Garnish with sugar and cinnamon.


[1] The first recipe calls for this which is common fare for puddings.


NOLA’S xix-3





Friday, January 13, 2017

PASADOR WITH RECIPE FOR SPIT ROAST PHEASANTS IN ONION SAUCE

Spit roasted chicken instead of pheasants
Photo by: Lord-Williams


pasador, ast, Cat broqueta, Eng. brooch, spit. [Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:199]

HOW TO SPIT ROAST PHEASANTS IN ONION SAUCE ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVI LXXIIII[1] QUE HABLA DE COMO SE DEBEN HACER LAS PERDICES EN BROQUETA CON “PORIOLA,” p 114

Ingredients

2 phesants

lard for basting
For the sauce:
1 large onion
1 c wine
salt to taste

The Medieval Spanish Chef’s additions to the sauce:
1 bullion cube
1 c wine
1 tbsp flour
Simply Tastey
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Preparation

Clean pheasants and wash with boiling. Grease them well with lard to prevent burning.  Put them on a spit and roast until done, about 20 minutes.

Scald an onion in boiling water. Peel it. Chop it. Slowly cook it in wine until absorbed and the onion is tender. Add salt to taste.

The Medieval Spanish Chef’s additions:

Put the onions in a food processor and grind. Add wine and bullion cube and grind  again. Pour the mixture into a large frying pan. Heat and add the flour little by little until it thickens.

Serve with pheasants.


[1] For other recipes of pheasants roasted on a spit with onion sauce see Nos. 75 and 86.
[2] Chicken was used as partridge was not in season.

                         SENT SOVI LXXIIII                                 

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

PASA WITH BAGHDAD RECIPE FOR SIKBĀJ, SWEET AND SOUR LAMB

Today Golden Seedless Raisins are Preferred to
the Original Brown/Black Raisins
Photo by: Lord-Williams
pasa seca, uva seca, OCast passa, L. racemus, Ar. ’inab or zebīb, Fr. raisin sec, Eng. raisin. A mature grape dried in the sun. it is a typical ingredient in Mediterranean cuisine. They are moderately warm and humid, mature, fattening and healthy for the liver according to Avenzoar. The juice was used with that of grapes in Al-Andalus to make a drink called “nabid” which could be alcoholic or non-alcoholic. [Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:72; Nola. 1989:xvi-2:xxxiii-1:xxxv-2 etc; and Nola/Pérez. 1992:205]                

MEDIEVAL ARAB COOKERY, PROSPECT BOOKS. 2001. A.J. ARBERRY’S TRANSLATION OF A BAGHDAD COOKERY BOOK CHAPTER 1 SOUR DISHESSIKBĀJ, p 40

Ingredients

SIKBĀJ at the end of cooking time
Photo by: Lord-Williams
3 carrots or 2 eggplants
2 tbsp olive oil
1 lb meat from shoulder of lamb cubed
1 tbsp fresh coriander
1” cinnamon bark
salt to taste
1 tbsp dried coriander
2 medium white onions
2 leeks
seasonings such as
salt to taste
½ c wine vinegar
½ c date juice or honey
1 tsp saffron mashed and dissolved
1 handful almonds
1 handful raisins
1 handful currants
1 handful dried figs
1 tbsp rosewater

Preparation
A sure bet if you like sweet and sour and lamb!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
If using eggplants boil covered for 15 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Heat olive oil in a skillet. Brown the meat, sealing it on all sides. Add onions, leeks  and carrots (if using). Cook until onions are translucent. Add cinnamon and coriander.
Cover the mixture with water. Add salt to taste. Bring to a boil and simmer for 20 minutes. Skim off froth as necessary. Put eggplants on top of the meat at the end of cooking time.
Mix honey and vinegar. Taste to insure that it is sharp and sweet. Pour this mixture over the eggplants. Let cook for about 5-10 minutes. Remove ¼ c liquid to dissolve mashed saffron and pour this over the eggplants.

Simmer uncovered for about 40 minutes until the liquid is reduced and has thickened.

Pour raisins, peeled and slit almonds and dried figs over the eggplants. Cover and reduce heat as much as possible and simmer 1 hr. When done, sprinkle with rosewater and serve.

MEDIEVAL ARAB COOKERY, PROSPECT BOOKS. 2001. A.J. ARBERRY’S TRANSLATION OF A BAGHDAD COKERY BOOK CHAPTER 1 SOUR DISHES, p 40


Monday, January 9, 2017

PAPADA DEL PUERCO WITH THE BARONESS' RECIPE FOR A 'POWERFUL POT!'

A Pig Scratching his Head
Photo from: funvids4kids
papá, cogullada, OCast. cachaza del puerco Eng. 1. double chin, dewlap, fold of skin hanging under the neck of a bovine animal, low part of  the pig’s jaw, see papos. 2. bacon from the dewlap, which has with a special flavor . It can be a sausage ingredient or included in dishes containing entrails. It can be marinated or preserved in salt. Villena labeled this as heavy food. [Dialecto 1947:285; Serradilla. 1993:146; and Villena/Calero. 2002:37b]

THE BARONESS OF AMISERAT’S RECIPE FOR A ‘POWERFUL POT/OLLA PODEROSA, KNOWN TODAY AS OLLA PODRIDA (A ROTTEN POT)[1]


Ingredients
for 4 persons

12 oz chickpeas
1 trotter
1 pig ear
A Thick Strip of Bacon
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 qt white wine
1 carrot
1 leek
1 onion
2 garlic cloves
10 sprigs of parsley
10 sprigs of thyme
8 sprigs of rosemary
6 sprigs of sage
1 bay leaf
salt to taste
½ tsp white pepper
2 tbsp olive oil
1 thick strip  bacon from dewlap, 3 ½ oz 
¼ c flour
5 oz lean meat
7 oz  pork ribs
1 chicken breast
1 celery stick
5 oz ham
2 chicken livers
1 blood sausage
1 chorizo
½ cabbage

Preparation

Soak chickpeas 6-8 hours in an earthenware dish. In another dish soak the ear and trotter over night.

Just Right on a Cold Winter Day!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Cook wine to remove alcohol content. Put it in a bowl with ribs, chopped carrot, leeks and onion. Mash garlic cloves and add them with herbs. Let sit overnight.

Put the beans in cloth bag and put them in a pressure cooker. 

Remove the ear and trotter from the water. Wash them and cut them into small pieces. Wash well.

Chop the bacon and start frying. Add the onion and garlic from the marinade. When the onion is translucent, stir in flour. Little by little add broth. Simmer until the broth starts to thicken.

Chop the lean meat and put it in the pressure cooker with the chickpeas, pork ribs and marinade. Chop the chicken breast and celery. Add these with the onion mixture in the broth and remaining ingredients to the meat. Add cold water to cover this.

Slowly cook the meat for about 15 minutes after the water starts to boil. Strain it and save the broth. Serve as a soup with slices of bread like soppes.

Serve the solid ingredients as a second course all on one platter for eater to choose at will.


[1] The baroness maintains that this was first called a “Powerful Pot” (Olla Podersa) as powerful subjects were the only ones who could afford all the ingredients. Somehow the name became “podrida” (rotten). Sancho Panza explains in Don Quijote, Bk II, Chap 47 that the older the dish, the favorable it was.  This dish originated in Burgos and was eaten during winter months for its calories.

Friday, January 6, 2017

PANQUEQUE WITH ANOTHER FORERUNNER OF PANCAKES

Spreading flatbread with almond filling
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Flem pannekoek (frying pan biscuit), It. crespelle, Eng. pancake. It is said to be of Flemish origin. Those from the medieval Alhambra were made with a crepe like dough, usually containing a salt, a sweat and sour or sweet filling such as pork (other meat if prepared by Muslims), cheese, orange cream and fried like those made in Argentina today. [Benavides-Barajas. Alhambra. 1999:153-154; and ES: “Fiesta.” Mar 30, 03]

ANOTHER VARIETY OF A FORERUNNER OF PANCAKES [1] ADAPTED FROM ANÓN/HUICI AL-ANDALUS #433 OTRA CLASE DE MIŠĪŠ[2], p 239

Ingredients

For the flatbread:
1 ½ c semolina 
¼ c dissolved animal fat or oil
3 ½ tsp yeast
¾ c water

Filling
½ c almonds
Preparing Rose Syrup
Photo by: Lord-Williams
½ c sugar
½ c rosewater
½  tsp camphor

1 raw egg slightly beaten
oil for frying



ROSE SYRUP ADAPTED FROM ANON/HUICI AL-ANDALUS #500 JARABE DE ROSA FRESCAS Y RECETA PARA HACERLO, p 273

1 lb roses[3]

< font-size: 12.0pt;">1 lb sugar

Preparation

Mix all the ingredients for the flat cakes in a food processor. Knead 10 minutes and cover. Let rise.

Make the filling by grinding the almonds and sugar in a food processor. Put the mixture in a saucepan with rosewater and camphor. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and gently boil until it thickens. Remove from heat and let cool.

Roll out the flatbread dough and make circular cakes, 4 ½”/12 cm in diameter.

Cover one flatbread with a spoonful filling. Spread it out eveningly and then put another flatbread on top.  Paint the edges with raw egg and seal them.

Heat olive oil. Fry the flatbreads on both sides. Remove from heat and place in rose syrup.

Looks like a forerunner of a pancake!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Make rose syrup by washing roses and covering them with 1 qt boiled water.  Let sit for 24 hours until the roses start to fall apart. Cook them in the water with the sugar until a syrup forms.  Pour this over the flat cakes.


[1]  Huici states that the word is derived for mišša which means dissolve, dilute. Perry, on the other hand indicates that is is derived from Ar mishâsh.Charles He explains that in 15th century Iran, Mishash was the name of a sweetmeat made from sesame seeds but none of the Al-Andalus “mishmash” recipes call for sesame seeds.

[2] It is debatable if this is a flaky cookie or a forerunner of a pancake. Considering the different types of fried dough in the Hispano-Muslim and Catalan medieval texts, it seems like between all the flat cakes, fritters and turnovers, this recipe could be a forerunner of the Crepes Suzettes that existed before Suzettte!
[3] If not available, boil 2 c rosewater with 2 cups sugar until a thick sauce forms.