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Friday, October 31, 2014

GARNACHA WITH RECIPE FOR FRENCH BREAD DOCUMENTED IN 15TH CENTURY SPAIN

Garnacha
Photo by: Lord-Wiliams
1. Muscatel wine made with a delicate purplish grape variety like Muscat grown in Navarre, Aragon and Catalonia; a special type of good tasting purplish-red wine. It was common in the court of Navarre to begin a meal with an appetitive consisting of garnacha or a variety of sweet wine like muscatel or Greek wine (malmsey?) and slices of toasted bread similar to torriijas, which came to be called garnachas
. Since it has developed into a chocolate sweet. During the appetitive, all sorts of fresh fruit boiled and sweetened with sugar and honey were also served. 

The type of wine consumed depended on where members of the royal family were staying as in the case of garnacha (spicy wine), brought from Paris by the servants of the Countess Inés de Foix (+1397) or Greek wine, which was frequently consumed when the monarchs were in the province of Aragon. 

2. gown, long robe with sleeves falling in folds from the neck over the shoulders and down the back, judges’ robe, (pl.) gentlemen of the robe. 

3. men’s hair do, ring of hair shaved off in the center and long hair falling in rings down the back. In the olden days, men from the Maragato in Leon and others living around Astorga had their hair cut in this fashion. It is reminiscent of the Goth’s hairdo. 

4. wreath. 

[Dialecto. 1947:243; ES: Serrano. 2014; García Rey. 1934:94; Ruíz/Brey. 1965:966b:158]

TORRIJAS, TODAY KNOWN AS FRENCH TOAST, RECIPE FROM THE ARCHIVES OF BARONESS OF ALMISERAT[1]


Ingredients

Slicing Day Old Bread
Photo by: Lord-Williams


1 ½ c milk

1 tsp sugar

¼ c yeast
4 ¾ c  flour

1 tsp
salt


Preparation

Put the milk and sugar in a pan and heat until the sugar dissolves. Add yeast, half the flour and salt. Knead all together while slowing incorporated the rest of the flour. Knead 15-20 minutes until smooth.

Put the milk and sugar in  a pan and heat for the sugar to liquefy. Remove from heat and add yeast, half the flour and salt. Stir all together and then add the rest of the flour. Knead 15 minutes until
smooth.

PREHEAT OVEN TO 400ºF/200ºC

Rub a mold (12”x4 ½”x2 ¾” with butter and sprinkle it with flour. Put the dough in it. It should be half full. Let the dough sit until double in volumne. Bake about 30 minutes until done.

Let the mold sit on for 10 minutes and then remove the bread from the mold and set on a screen to cool and let it sit overnight.

RECIPE FOR TORRIJAS
Ingredients for 4 persons

Dipping Bread into a Beaten Egg
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 loaf of bread, one day old
1 c milk
¼ c sugar
zest from ½ lemon
½ cinnamon stick ground
1 egg

Garnish
6 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp ground cinnamon

Preparation

Slice bread making ½” thick slices (about 14 pieces) and set aside.

Garnacha Wine with Torrijas
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Put milk in a saucepan with the sugar, lemon zest and cinnamon. Heat until sugar is dissolved. Set aside letting it cool.

Dip the slices of bread into the milk covering both sides. Then dip each slice into a slightly beaten egg.

Heat a frying pan and add the olive oil. When hot fry the slices of bread until golden brown.

Remove from heat and sprinkle with a mixture of sugar and cinnamon.

This is a typical dish made during Holy Week in Spain.



[1] As today’s garnacha recipes New World products, it appears that the original recipe has disappeared. As torrijas were documented from the beginning of the 14th Century in Spain the following recipe is provided, which is very tasty with garnacha wine.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

GARFIO WITH A PERFECT DISH FOR THE SOCIETY OF FANATICAL TOOTHPICK LOVERS


O Garfo
Photo from: Francisco Álvarez Bao
uña de oro ( gold fingernail), hook which served as toothpick. In Spain, after the banquet ended, the knights cleaned their teeth with “gold nails” Villena instructed carvers to do the same prior to serving the meal. [Baena/Dutton. 587:v30; and Vilena/Navarro. 1879:19]

ANOTHER DISH COOKED WITH SPINACH ADAPTED FROM IBN RAZÍN/MARIN, SECCIÓN SEGUNDO, CAPÍTULO SEGUNDO, SOBRE LA CARNE DE OVINO, #11. OTRO PLATO QUE SE COCINA CON ESPINACAS, p 155


A Delicious Lamb and Spinach Dish
Perfect for Fanatical Toothpick Lovers
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Ingredients

2 lbs spinach
2 lbs lamb for stewing
3 tbsp olive oil
¼ tsp white pepper
1 tbsp coriander
2 onions sliced
125 gr/4.4. oz  sheep fat
salt to taste
6 sprigs of cilantro leaves
6 sprigs of mint leaves

Garnish

250 gr/8.8 oz fresh cheese (Optional)

Preparation

Remove stems from spinach leaves. Wash the leaves in cold water and put into a strain to drip dry while preparing the meat.

Cube the met. Heat a large frying pan or wok. Add 2 tbsp oil and when hot and seal meat in it. Add the pepper, coriander and onions. Mix all well. Cover it and let it cook gently.[1]


Garfio
Photo from: Adrián López Dos Santos      
Chop the fat into bite size pieces. Select another large frying pan or wok and heat it and add 1 tbsp oil. Fry the fat. When golden brown, remove and set aside. Do not remove the grease. Add the spinach. Turn it until it wilts.

Put the spinach in a food processor to chop it. If decorating with fresh cheese, add the left over cheese to the spinach.

Add the spinach to the stew with the fat, cilantro and mint. Mix all well and pour the mixture into a serving dish.

On festive occasions such as wedding dinners, the dish is decorated with fresh cheese. It is presented to the guests and it is eaten; Bon Appetit is the God Almighty so wishes.

If desired, this can be made with kid meat, that is very appropriate for this dish.  Baby veal, killed before teething is another possibility. Further orach or pigweed can be used. 


[1] The recipe calls for the addition of water for stewing as meat had to be cooked longer to become tender than today.

Monday, October 27, 2014

GARBÍAS (fr Basq garbe) WITH CATALAN VEGGIE FRITTER RECIPE FROM THE 15TH CENTURY

Plath's Bee
by E M N O P.
Fr. garbure (garbue), Eng 1. vegetables. In Nola’s recipe “Frutas llamadas garbías,” the vegetables called for are chard and borrage. 2. today, garbue,  is a famous vegetable soup with a ham bone in Béarn, France. 3. ragout. [ES: Culinary. n/d; and Nola. 1989:xlviii-1]

CATALAN FRITTERS CALLED GARBÍAS ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S xlviii-1 FRUTAS LLAMADAS GARBÍAS A LA CATALANA

Filling Ready to be Stuffed
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Filling:
1 lb borrage[1]
½ lb chard
1-½ c fresh cheese
2 tsp salsas finas[2]
4 hard boiled egg yolks

Dough:
2 heaping c of flour
¾ c lard
¼ c water
1 raw egg white for sealing the dough

Garnish:
rosewater
honey
sugar and cinnamon

Preparation

Wash borrage and chard well. Put 1 c water in a pot and bring to a boil. Add the greens and cook 1-2 minutes until wilted. Remove them from the water and place them between two chopping blocks to press the water out.

Veggie Turnovers with a Delicious Twist
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Mix the cheese with the spices.

 Chop the greens and then add cheese with spices and chop these together. Add egg yolks and continue chopping until all is blended.

 Make a dough by kneading the flour with lard and water.  Roll out a very thin dough. Cut it out to make turnovers the size of one’s hand. Add the cheese mixture to the turnover dough and close them well be painting the edges with egg whites with a small paint brush and pressing them with the tip of a spoon.

Heat lard in a frying pan  When hot fry the turnovers. When golden brown put them on a serving platter and sprinkle with rosewater and then honey. Just before serving sprinkle sugar and cinnamon on top.



[1] As borrage was not avaiable spinach was used as a substitute.
[2] See blog titled dárselo published November 29, 2013 for recipe.

Friday, October 24, 2014

GARBANZOS WITH 13TH C HISPANO-ARAB RECIPE FOR CHICKPEAS

Fresh Chickpeas
Photo from Katherine Martinelli
OCast. garuanzos, garvanços, chicharo (in Roman times) Cat ciurons, L. Cicer arietinium, Ar. himmaş, humaiş (little chickpeas), MEng chyches, Eng. chickpeas. They grow best in predominantly muddy areas with plenty of sun. The Arabs brought them to Spain from the Orient, supposedly to the city of Cartagena in southwestern Spain.

Unlike the Romans, who laughed at anyone eating them, the Spaniards are said to have incorporated the chickpea readily into their cuisine “to keep the wife at home.” It was thought that chickpeas augmented sexuality by increasing the multiplication of sperms, maternal milk and menstrual periods, which of course left the wife very busy indeed.

Although the 13th C Hispano-Arab cookbook refers to it as an item only eaten by the poor, Arabs refuted this theory recalling the legend in “The Perfumed Gardens.” There, Abu el- Heidja in a single night “deflowered” eight virgins after a dinner of meat, onions, chickpeas and camel milk. Fadalat, the other  surviving 13th C Hispano-Arab culinary manuscript, provides three recipes for chickpeas.

The dried chickpea, being as hard as a bullet, is not edible until it has soaked overnight in water and then cooked for a long period of time. Reputedly the best chickpeas in Spain are those with brown specks and the tastiest are those from Valdeviejas, a town adjacent to Astorga. Those from Quintanilla de Somoza and Piedralba de San Cristobal (Leon) are reportedly as soft as pork fat once boiled briskly. In Astorga, highly regarded are those from Manjarín and Valle Oscuro, which are grown in predominately muddy soil. Further, planting and harvesting must be taken into account for the chickpea to “have a nice face.”

Dried Chickpeas
Photo by: Lord-Williams
There is a proverb in La Maluenga: “On St. Mark’s Day (April 25th), the chickpea is not born or sown”. It is planted between the middle of January and the later part of April, before St. Mark’s Day. Harvesting commences in the beginning of May. The chickpeas served with cocido are brought to the table in separate earthenware dish in Leon but elsewhere in Spain all the ingredients are served on the same platter.[1] Spanish Jewish Sabbath stews frequently included chickpeas.

In England, chickpeas are planted in September and October to prevent frosts from hurting the plant. Generally, they are boiled although there does exist an English medieval recipe called chyches, which calls for roasting chickpeas in ashes and then boiling them with spices, saffron, garlic and a little oil.

Chickpeas are used for fodder as well as human food as in southern Europe, Africa and Asia.  See cocido, cocido maragato and  puré de garbanzos. [Ares. “Comidas.” 1994: 85-86; Camba. 1995:46; Curye. 1985:73:114:178; ES: Benavides-Barajas. “Cocina.” Sep 29. 01; ES: FAO ¨Ch 28.¨Feb 2, 98; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:67; Montoro/Ciceri. 1991:201:l.48; and Nola/Iranzo. 1982:169]

RECIPE FOR DRIED CHICKPEAS ADAPTED FROM IBN RAZÍN/MARIN 
SECCIÓN NOVENA, CAPÍTULO SEGUNDO, SOBRE LOS PLATOS DE GARBANZOS #2. RECETA DE GARBANZOS SECOS, p 280

Boiling Chickpeas
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

1 c dried chickpeas
1 onion chopped
1 tsp white pepper corns
6 sprigs cilantro
1 tsp mashed saffron
1 tsp murri[2]
¼- ½ c vinegar

Preparation 

Wash chickpeas and put them in water to soak over night. The next day, strain and rinse the chickpeas. Put them in a pot and fill it with enough water to be 2” above the chickpeas. Add the onion. Put the pepper corns and cilantro in a spice bag. Close it tightly and put it in the pot.  Dilute mashed saffron in a little water and add it to the pot.

A Universal Dish for All - Jews, Christians and Muslims
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Bring it to a boil and simmer for ½ hr or longer depending on the chickpeas. When tender strain and discard the water and spice bag. Put the chickpeas back in the pot and add murri and vinegar. Mix well, cover and let sit covered for 15 minutes.

Taste for vinegar. Dependig on the strength of the vinegar used and personal tastes the amount can be adjusted by adding more vinegar or water to delute it if too strong. Served in a bowl.

Lime vinegar can be used instead of common vinegar and onion.


[1] See the three blogs titled Cocido published between March 20, 2013 – March 25, 2013 for récipes.
[2] See blog published August 25 2011 titled almorí for recipe.