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Thursday, April 30, 2015

HOJUELA WITH THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF'S RECIPE FOR DRUNKEN CREPES

Drunken Crepe Batter Ready for Frying
Photo by Lord-Williams
1. crepes. They could be served with sugar or with various sauces or filings as today. 2. skin left over from crushed olives. [Anón/Grewe. 1982:CLXI:175-176; Delgado. 1994:125; Enci mujer. 1969.3025:779:3168:809; ES: RAE. 2001, Nola. 1989:xlv-1]
              
A RECIPE FOR DRUNKEN CREPES FROM THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF’S ARCHIVES[1]
For 6-12 crepes depending on size

Ingredients

1 lb wheat flour
6 eggs
1 c brandy
2 c milk
salt to taste
olive oil for frying
1 c honey


Perfect for Starting or Finishing the Day
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Put the flour in a bowl. Make a hole in the middle and break the eggs into this. Add the brandy, salt to taste and milk. When well mixed, cover and let sit ½ hr.

Heat a frying pan (preferably non-stick) and add just enough oil to lightly cover the surface. When very hot add one ladle of batter. Tip the pan for it to spread the batter into a thin crepe. When golden brown on onside turn it to brown the other side. When done, remove and place on paper towels to absorb the excess oil.

Repeat this until all the batter is fried. Place the crepes on a platter. Drizzle with honey and serve warm.



ANÓN AL-ANDALUS 
#406 HECHURA DE ENGRASADA QUE ES EN HOJALDRE, p 224
AMBROSIO HUICI'S TRANSLATION
Se toma sémola pura o harina de trigo y se hace un amasado apropiado sin levadura y se rocía poco a poco y no se cesa de amasarlo hasta que se deshaga y tome su pinto y se ablande por donde se extiende un pedazo de él sin cortarse; entonces se pone un freidor Nuevo a un fuego moderado y cuando se ha calentado tomarás un pedazo de esa pasa y lo extiendes sobre mármol o sobre plancha en lamina Delgado y lo embadurnas con grasa fundida o con mantequilla deshecha en agua; luego enróllalo como una tela[1], hasta que se haga como una caña; luego entretéjelo y bátelo con tu puño hasta que se haga un pan delgado y redondo, y si quieres, dóblalo también; entonces lo extiendes y lo bates con tu puño por segunda vez hasta que se haga redondo y delgado; entonces lo pones en el freidor hasta que se ligue, luego lo sacas y haces lo demás hasta que termines la cantidad que necesites; luego lo bates entre tus manos y lo echas en mantequilla y miel; se hierve, y cuando se ha enfriado, espolvoréalo con azúcar molido y lo presentas.


PERRY'S TRANSLATION INTO ENGLISH OF
ANON, AL-ANDALUS #406
PREPARATION OF MUSAMMANA [BUTTERED] WHICH IS MUWARRAQA [LEAFY]
Take pure semolina or wheat flour and knead a stiff dough without yeast. Moisten it little by little and don't stop kneading it [p. 63, verso] until it relaxes and is ready and is softened so that you can stretch a piece without severing it. Then put it in a new frying pan on a moderate fire. When the pan has heated, take a piece of the dough and roll it out thin on marble or a board. Smear it with melted clarified butter or fresh butter liquified over water. Then roll it up like a cloth until it becomes like a reed. Then twist it and beat it with your palm until it becomes like a round thin bread, and if you want, fold it over also. Then roll it out and beat it with your palm a second time until it becomes round and thin. Then put it in a heated frying pan after you have greased the frying pan with clarified butter, and whenever the clarified butter dries out, moisten [with butter] little by little, and turn it around until it binds, and then take it away and make more until you finish the amount you need. Then pound them between your palms[1] and toss on butter and boiling honey. When it has cooled, dust it with ground sugar and serve it.







[1] For Sent Soví’s crepe recipe #CLXI, pp 175-176, see blog titled cofina, published April 17, 2013 and for Nola’s pancake recipe xlv-1, see blog titled Carnestolendas published August 31, 2012.

Friday, April 24, 2015

HORTIFRUTÍCOLA WITH 13TH CENTURY APPLE SYRUP RECIPE

Slicing Aloe Vera for Sap
Photo by: Lord-Williams
relating to fruit orchards. [Gázquez. 2002:247]

519. Syrup of Apples

Ingredients

1 lb sweet apples
1 lb sugar
1 aloe vera leaf


Preparation

Take 1 lb sweet apples, commonly called sarïb [1] boil them in water until soft. Remove from heat. Let cool. Peel them and remove core and seeds.

Put them back into the pot with 1 lb sugar. Add a bag with an aloe left cut to fit into it. Cook the apples into a syrup. Remove from heat and press the stewed aloe leaf. Add the juice to the applesauce.

The recipe advised to drink 1 oz  of the mixture in 2 of hot wate but without water it is a special apple sauce.

A Real Treat for Apple Lovers
Photo by: Lord-Williams
The recipe indicates that the watered down version has the following benefits: it fortifies and gladdens the heart.


ANÓN AL ANDALUS 
#519 JARABE DE MANZANA, p 282
AMBROSIO HUICI'S TRANSLATION
FROM HISPANO-ARABIC INTO CASTELLANO
Se toma una libra de manzanas dulces, de las llamadas por el pueblo sarïb; se cuecen en agua que las cubra hasta que se deshagan y salga su sustancia, luego se clarifica y se toma lo claro y se añade a una libra de azúcar. La bolsa. Palo de aloe, una onza que se maja y se pone en la bolsa<, se cuece hasta que toma forma de jarabe. Se bebe una onza de dos de agua caliente. Sus ventajas: fortalece el corazón y alegra.


PERRY’S TRANSLATION INTO ENGLISH OF
 SYRUP OF APPLES
ANON, AL-ANDALUS
Take a ratl of sweet apples, those that the common people call sarîj [this might mean "little lamps"][1], cook them in water to cover until they fall apart and their substance comes out, then clarify it and take the clear part and add it to a ratl of sugar. The bag: an ûqiya of aloe stems, pounded and put into the bag. Cook until it takes the form of a syrup. Drink an ûqiya in two of hot water. Its benefits: it fortifies and gladdens the heart.
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[21]This recipe too must be from Ibrahim b. al-Mahdi. (HM)
[1] Perry says this could mean “little lamps,” while Huici maintains it is  village.