Entradas populares

Friday, September 23, 2016

MOXI WITH 13TH CENTURY STUFFED EGGPLANT RECIPE

Sewing up a Stuffed Chicken
Photo by: Lord-Williams
moji, Ar. mahshi, MEng farced, ffarced, farsed, y-farsyd, Eng stuffed dish. Examples are stuffed eggplant, fowl or fish that may be boiled, fried or baked. 

[Anón/Huici.1966:63:46-47:338:188:340:188: etc ES: Anon/Perry. Sep 5, 02:ftn131; and Nola:1989:xli-1]

See blog titled cuajadera published September 30, 2013 for Nola’s recipe “Moji Casserole.”

ANOTHER TYPE OF STUFFING ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S ANÓN AL-ANDALUS RECIPE #340 OTRA CLASE DE RELLENO

Ingredients
(½ eggplant per person)

Stuffed Eggplant
A nice change from mundane menus
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 lb eggplant
2 tbsp salt
2 tbsp breadcrumbs
1 egg
½ lb ground beef
seasoning such as 1 tbsp freshly chopped basil, 1 tsp oregano and ½ tsp white pepper
olive oil

Preparation

Select nicely shaped eggplants. Wash them and cut them in half and rub the pulp with salt. Place the two pieces, face/pulp side down on a paper towel and leave ½ hour to let the bitterness sweet out.

PREHEAT OVEN TO 400ºF/200ºC

Remove pulp to within ½ “ of the skin. Boil the pulp in salted wáter until tender. Drain the wáter and mash the pulp. Mix this with breadcrumbs, a slightly beaten egg, ground beef and seasoning. Fill the skins with this mixture. Sprinkle with a little olive oil.

Grease a cookie sheet with olive oil. Place the eggplant halves on the sheet and bake 15º until warm.  Serve on a platter.

HUICI’S ANÓN AL-ANDALUS RECIPE #340





Wednesday, September 21, 2016

MOXERIC WITH 14TH CENTURY CHICKEN IN LIVER SAUCE RECIPE

Vinegar and Honey
2 Basic Ingredients for Sweet and Sour
Photo by: Lord-Williams
moxarich, sweet and sour liver sauce for chicken. Moxeric is thought to be derived from Arabic and indicates a dish of various fowl in a sweet and sour sauce with spices, hard boiled eggs and livers. [Anón/Grewe. 1982: LXV:108 and LXVI:109; and Lladonosa. 1984. 130:158]

See blogs titled higado, published March 6, 2015 and espetar published May 9, 2014 for Sent Sovi’s recipe LXVI Sweet and Sour Chicken Dish.

CHICKEN IN LIVER SAUCE ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ #LXV QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FFER GUALLNES AB MOXARICH EN OLLA, p 108

Ingredients

1 chicken
1 c chicken broth
2 hard boiled eggs
½ lb bacon
2 chicken livers
1 slice of day old bread
¼ c vinegar
1 c honey
spices such as:
            1 tsp cinnamon
            1 tbsp ginger scrapings
            ½ tsp white pepper
            ½ tsp mashed and diluted saffron

Preparation

Wash, clean and boil chicken until cooked. When done make a sauce by blending 1 c chicken broth with hard boiled eggs.

Preheat frying pan and fry bacon. Carve chicken according to Enrique Villena’s instructions (see blog by this name published March 24, 2013). Sauté the meat in bacon fat. (If more grease is necessary add lard.) Remove the chicken and set aside. Sauté the livers.

Put the livers in the food processor with the broth, hard boiled eggs and the rest of the ingredients and blend. (The Medieval Spanish Chef added the bacon, which enhanced the flavor.)

Mix the sauce with the chicken. Simmer for about 12 minutes before serving. Serve with fresh bread.

SENT SOVÍ 





Monday, September 19, 2016

MOSTO GRAPE WITH RECIPE FOR VERJUICE

Grapes Fresh from the Vine
Photo by: Lord-Williams
must; grape juice before and during fermentation. Avenzoar explained that this was the basic of fermented drinks, syrups and vinegars. It is hot and humid. When drunk immediately after squeezing the stomach becomes inflamed, the bowels rumble and during three days pain exists in various organs (the majority are occasional) unless someone with a young, strong organism in which case it can be well digested although this is not frequent.

Gabriel Alonso de Herrera advises: There are those who keep the grapes for one year without squeezing. After they are squeezed they are stained and kept in an airtight container 40 days. Then the juice is used. It is sweet, flavorful and it stops indigestion. La Celestina used it in a preparation for facial treatment but it has been impossible to find the ingredients. 

Truly Refreshing
Photo by: Lord-Williams
[Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:72;
Laza. 2002:162; Llamas. 1994:168-169; Madrid. 1980:20; and Pacho. 1994:156]

HOW TO MAKE A GOOD COMFORTING VERJUICE ADAPTED FROM NOLA xxxii-3 PARA HACER BUEN AGRAZ CONFORTATIVO

Ingredients 
(makes about 1 quart)

Ingredients

1 lb unripe grapes
1 sprig or basil leaves

Preparation
Remove grapes from stems. Wash the grapes. Slice them in half and remove pits.

Grind grapes with a sprig or some basil leaves. Strain the liquid to remove the peels. It is very good for comforting the heart. The flavor is very good.

See blogs titled guarnición published January 9, 2015 and ijar published May 25, 2015 for Nola's "Sauce Called Cinnamon of Must."

Friday, September 16, 2016

MOSTAZA WITH RECIPE THAT DID NOT CUT THE MUSTARD BUT GOOD!

Mustard Plant
Photo by: Lord-Williams
L. Sinapis alba, Ar. şināb, Fr. moutarde, Eng. white mustard. It is a plant that originated from a weed growing in central Asia. After it was discovered that the pungent seeds improved the flavor of meats it was cultivated and brought to Asia Minor. From there it came to Africa and Europe. At first Greeks and Romans used mustard only as medicine, finding the leaves and crushed seeds good for sore muscles. Pliny prescribed it to cure all pains in any part of the body, lethargy and epilepsy. It was thought good to curb female hysteria.

During the Middle Ages mustard seasoned innumerable dishes and was thought to be a good blood thinner. The leaves and seeds are used as emetics, stimulants and irritants. It was mixed with vinegar and almonds to prevent it from rising to the brain, which was thought dangerous.
Summer Harvest
Photo from: Daniel Bachhuber

The Ancient Greeks began to grind up the seeds and sprinkle them over their food. It is not as pungent as black mustard. Romans used white mustard and found that pulverized seeds kept grape juice from spoiling and they used them in wine. Grape juice was called must and mustard seed was “mustseed.” In England this custom was adapted. There, mustard became the poor man’s spice. In medieval Castile, it was served with fresh boiled beef and pork. In Andalusia, leaves were added to salads and ground mustard was added to vinaigrettes and preserves.

Black and White Mustard Seed
Both black and white mustard are powerful preservatives especially against bacterial growth and mold, which explains it’s frequent used in pickling sauces and marinades. White mustard, however, is the best while black mustard has a stronger flavor.

In medieval times it was not the mustard known today for it was not until 1720 that a Mrs. Clements of Durham, England discovered how to bolt mustard powder, i.e. successively sifting it through fine screens to remove the outer hull of the mustard seed and grinding the seed in a flour mill to obtain the more flavor. With the patent she received from King George I, Durham Mustard came into being, which was later taken over by Jeremiah Colman, who in 1866 perfected the technique further by grinding the seeds without creating heat. This prevented the evaporation of the oil giving still more flavor to the product. To “cut the mustard” is not an ancient expression. It was not documented until 1903 in reference to harvesting it. The best flavor comes with the processing, i.e. “if you can’t cut the mustard, you can’t supply what is best.”

A Curious Combination Mustard Seed Sauce, Must and
Mustard Seed Sauce in Must
(see blog titled Mosto)
Photo by Lord-Williams

[Bremness, 1990:60; ES: Carroll-Mann. Guisados 2-art. Jun 6, 01:ftn 124; Curye. 1985:13; ES: Jordan. Jul 96; ES: Mustard. Apr 27, 03; ES: Simpson. Dec 21; ES: Sorrenti. Apr 4, 02; and Villena/Calero. 2002:23a]

HOW IT IS MADE ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #130 CÓMO SE HACE (a recipe to prevent mustard from rising to the brain!)

Ingredients

¼ c mustard seeds
salt to taste

1 c broth
½ c almonds
1 slice of day old bread
2 tbps vinegar
1 tbsp honey

Preparation

Wash seeds and then scald with three times with boiling water.

Nothing is More Delightful than a Kebab
with a Dab of Mustard Sauce
Grind mustard seeds in a coffee grinder, a stone or wood mortar or a food processor. Wash them in hot water. Drain and return to mortar or food processor.  Add salt.

Add water and stir well. Let sit 10 minutes. The strength of the mustard depends on the length of time the sauce is left to sit, the longer the milder.

Place almonds in a pot with water, bring to a boil and remove from burner. Peel by snapping the nut out of its skin. Toast peeled almonds.

Soak the bread in vinegar.

Mix all the ingredients in a food processor. Add more broth if necessary to make the sauce creamy.

Pour into a glass jar. Refrigerate overnight, at least 10 hours before using. This recipe can last refrigerated for one year.

HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #130