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Monday, August 29, 2016

MORCÓN WITH RECIPE FOR BLOOD PUDDING TURNOVERS

Spreading Blood Pudding Mixture
on Half of a Turnover
Photo by: Lord-Williams
blood pudding. [Pers. Memories. Slaughter Mostoles 2000:2001:2003]

THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF’S RECIPE FOR BLOOD PUDDING TURNOVERS

Ingredients

Dough for 12 turnovers, about 5” in diameter

The filling:
1 leek
1 garlic clove
¼ lb soft cheese
2 eggs
¼ lb blood pudding or sausage
½ tsp cumin
½ tsp thyme
olive oil for frying

Preparation

A Perfect Way to End a Day!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Prepare turnover dough. Cut into circles and set aside.

Mince leek. Heat frying pan with 1 tbsp olive oil and sautée. Mash garlic clove and add to the leek when almost translucent.

Mash cheese and mix with one egg. Mix with cumin and thyme.

If using blood sausage, remove encasing. Lightly fry.

Mix all the above ingredients and spoon over turnovers.

Beat the second egg and paint the edges of the turnover dough with this. Seal shut pressing down on the edges with a fork. Prick the tops of the pastries for air holes.

Heat enough oil for deep frying. When boiling hot add turnovers one at a time. Fry until golden brown.  Serve piping hot.









Friday, August 26, 2016

MORCILLERA WITH BLOOD PUDDING, CARAMELIZED ONIONS AND FRIED EGGS

Frying Blood Sausage and Onion
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1. n. mixture for blood sausages. 2. v. the act of stuffing intestines with a blood sausage mixture.  See blog titled encañar published February 26, 2014. [Pers. Memories. Slaughter Mostoles 2000:2001:2003]

THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF’S RECIPE FOR BLOOD PUDDING WITH CARAMELIZED ONIONS AND EGGS


Ingredients – 1 per person

1 blood sausage[1]   
olive oil for frying
1 onion
1 tbsp sherry
1 egg per person
salt to taste

Simply Delicious!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Slice sausage. Fry in 2 tbsp oil. Cover to keep warm and set aside.

Slice onion. Heat a frying pan. Add 2 tbsp oil. Sautée onion until translucent. Add sherry. Mix well and let bubble until caramelized. Cover to keep warm and set aside.

Heat another frying pan with 1 c oil. When boiling hot, add eggs and fry to a crisp.

Place sausage on a platter. Cover with caramelized onion and top with one fried egg per person. Serve immediately.


[1] As this was considered peasant food, it is difficult to find written recipes for blood pudding but this concoction is logical.

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

MORCILLA WITH A "BLACK AND WHITE" SANDWICH WITH FRENCH BREAD

2002 - The Slaughter Man and Inés
Catching Blood from Pig's Artery
with Red Bucket for Blood Sausage
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCast morcón (fr mondongo), morsilla, morzilla, muresillo, musçilaginosa, OCat murcies (a stuffing), Leon morciella, Ar. mirkás (merguez sausage made with meat from a lamb’s leg or shoulder and murri naqi’ instead of blood), Port. morcella, Eng. blood sausage or black pudding. Basically, it consists of blood (collected when the pig’s throat or aorta is slit), seasoned pork from the belly or the meat between the shoulder and the elbow, fat from the chin and caul. The Leonese add onion, while those from Burgos use rice. In León, it can consist of blood and cured lamb suet. Each region and household has its particular recipe.

Some priests, beside Pablo Santa María, 1350-1435 (a Jew who converted to Christianity), thought that Genesis IX: iii-iv, prohibited consumption of animals’ blood and they believed that it caused melancholy and illnesses. They even forbid Maragato cocido (boiled stew) as “heretical food” as it contains blood sausage.

Carvers, after slicing meat, let the blood run out to prevent offending any guests. Others, like Baltasar de Alcazar, author of “Cena jocose” (jocular dinner), sang his praises for this sausage. 

Immediately, upon killing the pig, a woman, holding a pail, jumps in front of the pig to catch the blood spurting out of the gash. After a bit, another woman replaces her with another bucket. The first one quickly stirs what is in her bucket with a stick. Then she goes back to the pig while the second woman stirs the blood in her pail. They alternate in that fashion until the pig stops bleeding and the blood has been stirred sufficiently to prevent coagulation. In Estremadura, salt is not added, but in León it is.

Black Blood Sausage and White Sausage
Ready to be topped and devoured
So yummy!!!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Sheep’s blood does not coagulate. A pan is set under its chin while the slaughter man works on preparing other parts of the body after the kill. See morciellas and mondonga.
[Alonso Luengo. 1994:38; Anón/Grewe. 1982:IIII:65:f Anón/Grewe. 1982:IIII:65:ftn 3; Anón/Huici.1966:15-16; Ares. “Comidas.” 1994:108; Dialecto. 1947:270; Espasa. 1988:54:STA CUBICIA:190; Pers. Memories. Slaughter Mostoles 2000:2001:2003 and Chile 2002; Trapiello. 1994:139; Villena/Brown. 1984:173; and Villena/Navarro. 1879:66:271]

No recipe is needed for the simplicity of preparing sausage. Normally it is fried. In Valencia there are side walk stands surrounded by tables for customers ordering their specialty of “blanco y nergros,” i.e. one white sausage fried with one blood sausage served in a bread roll. Nothing can be more delicious!


MORCILLA WITH A "BLACK AND WHITE" SANDWICH WITH FRENCH BREAD

2002 - The Slaughter Man and Inés
Catching Blood from Pig's Artery
with Red Bucket for Blood Sausage
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCast morcón (fr mondongo), morsilla, morzilla, muresillo, musçilaginosa, OCat murcies (a stuffing), Leon morciella, Ar. mirkás (merguez sausage made with meat from a lamb’s leg or shoulder and murri naqi’ instead of blood), Port. morcella, Eng. blood sausage or black pudding. Basically, it consists of blood (collected when the pig’s throat or aorta is slit), seasoned pork from the belly or the meat between the shoulder and the elbow, fat from the chin and caul. The Leonese add onion, while those from Burgos use rice. In León, it can consist of blood and cured lamb suet. Each region and household has its particular recipe.

Some priests, beside Pablo Santa María, 1350-1435 (a Jew who converted to Christianity), thought that Genesis IX: iii-iv, prohibited consumption of animals’ blood and they believed that it caused melancholy and illnesses. They even forbid Maragato cocido (boiled stew) as “heretical food” as it contains blood sausage.

Carvers, after slicing meat, let the blood run out to prevent offending any guests. Others, like Baltasar de Alcazar, author of “Cena jocose” (jocular dinner), sang his praises for this sausage. 

Immediately, upon killing the pig, a woman, holding a pail, jumps in front of the pig to catch the blood spurting out of the gash. After a bit, another woman replaces her with another bucket. The first one quickly stirs what is in her bucket with a stick. Then she goes back to the pig while the second woman stirs the blood in her pail. They alternate in that fashion until the pig stops bleeding and the blood has been stirred sufficiently to prevent coagulation. In Estremadura, salt is not added, but in León it is.

Black Blood Sausage and White Sausage
Ready to be topped and devoured
So yummy!!!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Sheep’s blood does not coagulate. A pan is set under its chin while the slaughter man works on preparing other parts of the body after the kill. See morciellas and mondonga.
[Alonso Luengo. 1994:38; Anón/Grewe. 1982:IIII:65:f Anón/Grewe. 1982:IIII:65:ftn 3; Anón/Huici.1966:15-16; Ares. “Comidas.” 1994:108; Dialecto. 1947:270; Espasa. 1988:54:STA CUBICIA:190; Pers. Memories. Slaughter Mostoles 2000:2001:2003 and Chile 2002; Trapiello. 1994:139; Villena/Brown. 1984:173; and Villena/Navarro. 1879:66:271]

No recipe is needed for the simplicity of preparing sausage. Normally it is fried. In Valencia there are side walk stands surrounded by tables for customers ordering their specialty of “blanco y nergros,” i.e. one white sausage fried with one blood sausage served in a bread roll. Nothing can be more delicious!


Monday, August 22, 2016

MORCIELLAS DE MIEL (LEON), WITH AN EASY RECIPE FOR HONEY BLOOD SAUSAGE

Removing Skin from Blood Sausage
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Cast morcillas de miel, Eng honey blood sausage (consisting of blood, salt pork, suet and honey). In the Middle Ages blood sausage could be a dessert-like, meatless concoction of almonds, pine kernels, cloves, cinnamon, egg yolks and sugared scented water, bound together with pork grease. See morcilla. [Ares. “Comidas.” 1994:92]

HONEY BLOOD SAUSAGE, THE MEDIEVAL MANUEL QUITIAN'S  CONCOCTION

Ingredients

2 tbsp almonds
1 tbsp olive oil, plus oil for frying bread
2 blood sausages (optional)
1 tbsp pine kernels
½ tsp cloves
½ tsp cinnamon
2 egg yolks
3 tbsps honey
1 tbsp suet
8 thin slices of bread

Preparation

Simply Delicious Any Time of Year!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Boil almonds in water. Remove from heat and peel. Chop coarsely and set aside.

Heat olive oil in a frying pan. Remove sausage meat from casing and sautée. Add spices and nuts.  When toasted mix with egg yolks and add honey. Taste for sweetness. Add more honey if desired. Add suet and mix well.

Store refrigerated until ready to eat.

Thinly slice small pieces of bread and toast them.

At the same time warm the blood sausage mixture in a frying pan or microwave. When warm spread on bread and serve warm as hors d'oervres or dessert.



Friday, August 19, 2016

MONTORO, ANTÓN DE - WITH A JEWISH RECIPE FOR BURIED TREASURE

Cordoba Spain,
the old Jewish district
Photo by murray muraskin-spain
(Cordova 1404 -1480? Seville?), He was nicknamed “Cordova’s Clothier” as he was a used-clothes dealer as well as a taylor until 1473 when a wave of anti-Semitic riots broke out. He fled to Seville and it is thought that he stayed there.

Montoro is most remembered his satirical poetry and Cancionero, which appeared in 1445. It contains loud, strong verse that is burlesque and jocose. It created uproars among his fellow poets for his political protests and discourse on festivals.

With time, he became respected as Spaniards came to appreciate the dramatic, scholarly fantasy in his works. He is thought to be a main contributor to the commencement of Spanish theater. He was never a member of the court but seemed to have good relations with nobility including the Duke of Medina Sedonia, Pedro de Aguilar, Pedro de Estúñga, Miguel Lucas de Iranzo, the Marques of Santillana and Juan de Mena among others.

Frying Meatballs
Photo by: Lord-Williams
After 1474, Alonso de Aguilar became his protector in Seville. Gitlitz, points out that Montoro was accused of not being a true convert for preparing Jewish dishes such as Pollo Judio (Jewish Chicken) and radishes. His wife was tried for being a heretic by the Inquisition in 1486 and burned at the stake.

Reports are confused as to whether he died in Seville or returned to Cordova. Various years of his death are given but it is thought that he died shortly after the will was written in 1477 at the age of 73 or 74 years in Seville. [Bleiberg. 1993:II:L:1129; ES: Jacobs. Jul 8, 04; Gitlitz:1999:119; and Montoro/Ciceri. 1991:11-39.]

DAFINA[1], A VERSION OF A JEWISH DISH WITH A BURIED TREASURE ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF AL-ANDALUS #115 PLATO JUDÍO RELLENO OCTULTO, p 79

Placing meat over the omelette on the bottom
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 lb ground beef
½ tsp fine spices[2]
2 tbsp rosewater
1 c oil

¼ onion juice
salt to taste
13 eggs
1 tbsp flour
½ tsp white pepper
1 tsp cinnamon

Garnish
70 gr/2 ½ oz pistachios with shells
20 gr/0.7 oz pine kernels
1 tbsp whole mint leaves


Sauce
1 tbsp cilantro juice
½ onion
½ tsp murri[3]

Preparation

Divide meat in half. Mix one part with fine spices, 1 tbsp rosewater, onion juice and salt to taste. 

Make small meatballs this this. Sautée in olive oil,


The second omelette hiding the meat
Photo by: Lord-Williams
 
Beat 3 egg with flour, ¼ tsp pepper, ½ tsp cinnamon, 1 tbsp rosewater and the rest of the eat. Sautée in oil until done and set aside.

Make an omelette with 5 eggs, salt to taste, ¼ tsp pepper, ½ tsp cinnamon. Heat oil in a frying and cook the omelette. When browned on one side flip it to brown the over side.

Rpeat this step to make another omelette.

Create the "hidden dish" in an oven proof dish by placing the ground beef over one omelette. Top that with meatballs. Cover that with the second omelette.

PREHEAT OVEN TO 350ºF/180ºC[4]

Reheat the dish. 

For the garnish, shell and grind pistachios. Lightly toast pine kernels. Sprinkle the pistachios over the second omelette and then the pine kernels. Decorate with mint buds.

If God is willing, serve it up. 


[1] According to Perry, dafina means “buried treasure” as the name of the recipe infers. Traditionally, this is an Hispano-Jewish dish prepared the night before the Sabbath and left to cook all night as Jewish housewives were not allowed to cook on the Sabbath.  During the Middle Ages the pots of dafina were carried to the local baker where batter for bread was take from private homes, where ovens were not available to be baked. A Jewish boy was hired to watch over the pots of dafina to insure that no Christian products were added to the pots. Sephardic equivalent of the Ashkenazi dish cholent. For another recipe of dafina see blog titled adafina published October 23, 2010. 
[2] Salsas finas, 
< font-family: "times"; font-size: 13.5pt;">see blog titled dárselo published November 29, 2013 for recipe. 
[3] See blog titled almorí published August 25, 2011.
[4] During the Middle Ages when ovens were not available in homes, coals were placed over the lids of the pots to heat the tops of dishes.

HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF AL-ANDALUS #115