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Friday, July 7, 2017

PIORNO, BROOM PLANTS


Piorno (Genista florida)
Ramón Bravo Aliseda
retama blanca, escobón, xiniesta, L. Genista florida, Eng. French broom. The species is called florida for the profusion of nectar flowers that are produced from March through July. The green branches have whitish or grayish tones. It grows in southeastern France, the Iberian Peninsula and northeastern Morocco. It is most abundant in the northern and central Spain and Portugal. It is rare in Andalusia, Teruel, Zaragosa and Castellón. 

Ground broom was an ingredient used in making garum. During the Middle Ages the buds were boiled in wine vinegar or pickled. 

Garum
Photo from: 
Rafael dP. Iberia-Hispania
The English added broom to clarified mutton grease for chapped hands and used in lanoline for ewe’s udders during the birthing season. The juice extracted from the plant when crushed was used to kill lice. It is used to dye wool and flax although more commonly used is its relative common woadwaxen, also known as dyers’ greenwood (Genista tinctoria) as a yellow dye for fabrics or when mixed with woad, the dye turns Kendal Green. See almendras amaraga, chivo, compludo, ginestada  iniesta and retama negra

[Bolens. 1990:194Gran Enci Andalucia. 1979:6: Martínez:2827; Hartley. 2003:159-160; “Old.” 1894: 93; Pepys  1047. 15th C?:35; and Silva. 1994:174]

The Beauty of a Golden Color in a Medieval Dish
Photo by: Lord-Williams

See blog publications for recipes colored yellow like broom see Medieval Spanish Chef’s blogs titled:

Almendras Amargas published June 8, 2011 for Broom Pudding Recipe adapted from Sent Soví  #LVI Qui Parla Con Se Ffa Ginestrada Ab Let De Amelles, p. 100-101.  

Chivo published December 26, 2012 for Broom-Flower Pudding Recipe, Broom-Flower Pudding adapted from Nola xxi-2 Ginestada; and Iniesta published May 6, 2015 for a variation of the Broom Flower Pudding Reciped adapted from Nola xxi-2. Ginestada.

 “Compludo” published March 6, 2013 for Fried Mutton, Onions And Nuts colored brrom flower yellow with eggs and saffron adapted from Nola’s recipe for Dobladura of Mutton, 
xxxviii-4.

Ginestada published November 28, 2014 for Broom Flower Pudding adapted from Nola’s  Ginestada lxix-2.

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

PIÑONES WITH AN ADAPTATION OF THE 13TH CENTURY DISH OF CHICKEN WITH PINE KERNELS

Pine nuts
Photo from: wetwebwork
OCast. pelones, MEng pynade, pynnonade, pynes, pynez, pynotys, pynys, Eng. pine kernels or pinare extracted from the pinecone, toasted and served in a variety of dishes.

Dioscorides wrote that pine kernels are astringent and somewhat hot. Eaten alone or with honey diminishes coughing and helps chest illnesses. Mashed pine kernels eaten or drunk with cucumber seeds with a little wine brings on urination and tempers ardor in the bladder and kidneys. Drunk with purslane juice helps against smarting of the stomach, restores lost energy and represses corrupt humors. Picked fresh from the tree and boiled in wine helps old coughs.

Laguna stated: Pine kernels are very good for maintaining and engendering good humors, although there is some difficulty in digesting them. Apart from this they are nutritive, lenitive and resolutive. They are pectorals that make meat grow on the thin people however, if eaten in quantity they cause indigestion and hurt the stomach if eaten without soaking them in hot water.

Meatballs, Typical Addition to
Hispano-Arabic Recipes
Photo by: Lord-Williams
According to Laza, prepared in this way augments the sperm, awakens the genitals, modifies the kidneys and the bladder without acrimony. Due to the cost of labor, they are expensive today but formerly were typical ingredients in Mediterranean cuisine.

Penny pinchers used substituted pine kernels with wasps as they taste the same but they do not have as good nutritional sources as pine kernels or even pinecones.

[Austin. 1964:34; ES: Pegge. Oct 15, 03; ES: Renfrow. Jun 16, 04; Laza. 2002:168-169; Nola/Pérez. 1994:206; and Villena/Calero. 2002:23a]

A DISH WITH PINE KERNELS ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATIONS OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #306 PLATO DE PIÑONES, p 171

Ingredients

Spice, Onion and Pine Kernel Mixture
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 chicken deboned, skinned and chopped
1 c onion chopped
1 tbsp chopped parsley
½ tsp cinnamon
1 tsp ginger
½ tsp cloves
½ tsp white pepper
⅔ c pine kernels[1] 
olive oil for browning and cooking
4-8 eggs yolks

For meatballs:

½ lb of the chicken above
1 c breadcrumbs
1 egg
1 tbsp parsley
  
Preparation

For the meatballs:

Take grind ½ lb of the chicken. Mix this with the other ingredients and make meatballs.

The remainder:
Typical Medieval Colorful Presentation
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Brown the meatballs and the rest of the chicken in olive oil.

Make a mixture of the onion, herbs and spices, Grind half the pine kernels and add them to the mixture. Mix this with the chicken.

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Cover and simmer until the meat is cooked. Spread the remaining herbs and spices and whole pine kernels over the top.  Dot with egg yolks. Place it on the hearth until the yolks set. Serve warm.

[1]  As they are very expensive now, they were not available when preparing this recipe. Walnuts were substituted.

HUICI’S TRANSLATION O OF ANÓN, AL-ANDALUS #306 PLATO DE PIÑONES, p. 171









Monday, July 3, 2017

PIÑERA WITH 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR GROUND BEEF


A "Piñera"  or hide with small holes
Photo by: Lord-Wulliams
flour sifter, sieve with small holes. The most common consisted of raw hides with fur still intact. [Dialecto. 1947:294; and García Rey. 1934:124]

RECIPE FOR MAKING AHRASH ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN. AL-ANDALUS  #79. RECETA PARA HACER EL “AHRAŠ,” p 56[1]


Ingredients[2] 

1 lb ground beef with fat
1 c flour
2 garlic cloves
salt to taste
½ tsp white pepper
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp coriander
1 tsp caraway
1 tbsp murri
1 egg
Unique for the taste of rue
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 tsp chopped rue
olive oil for frying

Preparation

Pound well meat from two legs, shoulder etc. Add half the sifted flour, garlic peeled and mashed with salt, pepper, cumin, coriander and caraway, and let the pepper predominate, and some murri, and beat well with egg.  Add rue. Put the remainder of the flour in a bowl. Dip hands in this flour and make meatballs. Roll meatballs in flour to lightly coat them.  Fry them in hot olive oil..

The same recipe can be made with the meat of mirqâs, except that the egg is omitted, God willing.



[1] This is not the same recipe as #2 Receta para hacer el “Ahraš,” which is for lamb patties.
[2]  Quantities have been reduced for four servings. 


HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN. AL-ANDALUS 
 #79. RECETA PARA HACER EL “AHRAŠ,” p 56



Friday, June 30, 2017

PINCHOS DE CARNES MACERADAS WITH RECIPE FOR PERSIAN KEBOBS


Kebab
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ar. shish kebab, Eng shish-kebab. Benavides-Barajas calls them pinchitos persas (little Persian kebabs). They consist of small cubed meat or vegetables that are grilled on a stick or skewer. [Benavides-Barajas. Nueva-Clásica. 1995:213-214; ES: “Cocina catalana.” Oct 15, 05;  ES: “Kebab.” Nov 29, 05; and Ibn Razīn/Marín. 2007:Sección 2:Ch 4:7:188: Otro Plato: Sección 5:Ch 1:28:250]

PERSIAN KEBOBS TRANSLATED AND ADAPTED FROM BARAJAS-BENAVIDES NUEVA-CLÁSICA PINCHOS PERSAS, p 213-214[1]
 
Ingredients for 6-8- persons

1 lb chunks of chicken without skin or bones, pork or veal can be used instead
1 chopped onion
2 mashed garlic cloves
1 tbsp chopped cilantro
1 tbsp chopped mint
1 tsp ginger
lemon juice from half a lemon
salt to taste
½ tsp white pepper
2 tbsp honey
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1 tbsp white wine vinegar
If you try this 
you risk licking the dish!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
2 c natural yogurt

Garnish: a mixture of cinnamon, cumin, cloves, cilantro lightly fried

Preparation

Mix all the ingredients. Marinade the chicken 2 hrs. or over night. Stick the chunks of chicken on the kebob sticks and grill 15 minutes or until cooked.

In the meantime puree the marinade in a food processor and heat.in a double boiler, stirring continuously. If not the mixture will curdle due to the lemon juice. Pour this in soup dishes and place the kebobs on top.

Sprinkle with garnish and serve.


[1] As Benavides-Barajas does not document his sources it is unknown where he found the original recipe but this is recipe is quite novel, delicious and in keeping with the Hispano-Arab culinary tradition.


BARAJAS-BENAVIDES NUEVA-CLÁSICA PINCHOS PERSAS, p 213-214