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Friday, September 22, 2017

PUERCOS - PIGS

A Pig Before the Slaughter
Photo by: Lord-Williams
pigs. Pork was eaten fresh or salted. The body is divided into cuts as mutton. The hooves were boiled and marinated. The internal organs were cut like those of mutton and stuffed in the same way as mutton. See cerdo.and untos. [ES: Lord-Williams. “Aguardiente.” Nov 4. ’10: “Carcavo.” Aug 15, ’12:”Casar Chorizos.” Sep 4, ’12 etc.; and Villena/Calero. 2002:22b:31b-32b]

The Medieval Spanish Chef has adapted various sauces for pork have been adapted from Grewe’s translation of Anón Sen Soví Nos. LXXXVIIII, CXXI, XXVIII etc.  Further, over two dozen recipes involving pork have been published by the Medieval Spanish Chef. Of recipes not cited above but that were noted for their excellence include:  MRSamper’s “Torta de chicharrones” (Crackling Cake Recipe) published in blog titled “Choricera”  published Dec 31, ’12; and the Medieval Spanish Chef’s recipe for chorizo published Feb 1, ’13. 

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

PUCHERO, -A, WITH A 14TH CENTURY CHICKEN RECIPE SO DELICIOUS THAT LICKING THE BOWL IS A MUST!

Puchero
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1. pot, cooking pot. It is smaller than an olla but has the same uses. 2. stew, a cocido consisting of meat, pork fat, chickpeas and legumes, with regional and household variations. In Spain a common expression is “Come and eat from the puchero with me.” 3. the daily bread (meaning food). See cocido and cocido maragato. [Anón. Sent Soví. LVIII:102-103:CLXXXIIII:190; Dialecto. 1947:299;
Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:145; and Sas. 1976:513 and Serradilla. 1993:147]

Recipes for “cocidos” published in this blog include: “Cocido madrileño” published  March 20, 2013; “Cocido de diario” published March 22, 2013 and “Cocido maragato" published March 25, 2013.

HENS BOILED IN A POT ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ #LVIII QUE SE HABLA DE COMO SE CUECEN GALLINAS EN EL PUCHERO[1], pp 102-103

Pouring "Mujol" Sauce over Chicken
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

1 hen[2]
100 gr. chunks of lard
spices and herbs[3]
2 chicken livers
1 qt “mujols” sauce[4]
1 c orange or lemon juice
a slice of bread for each serving

Preparation

Clean chicken. Remove guts and cut off claws,. Put tit in a pot stuffed with chunks of lard in the breast. Put the chicken in a pot. Cover with cold water. Season with spices and herbs. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about one hour, until tender and the liquid is reduced to a sauce.

 Lick the Bowl is a Must!
Its' so delicious!!!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Mash the livers. Add one mashed garlic clove and a little liquid from the pot. Mix this with the “mujol” sauce. Add it to the pot and continue to simmer for about 20 minutes.

At the end of cooking time, add juice. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat.

Line individual soup bowls with sliced bread. Pour the soup over this and serve hot.


[1] Grewe translates this as olla while Gázquez uses the word puchero.
[2] Geese or other fowl can be used instead.
[3] Gázquez recommends salt, pepper, saffron, nutmeg and caraway.
[4] 1 qt almond milk, 1 tbsp ginger, 1 tsp saffron crushed, 2 hard boiled egg yolks mashed,1 c breadcrumbs, 1-2 tbsp honey. Mix these ingredients and put them in a pot. Bring to a boil and simmer.


                                  SENT SOVÍ #LVIII QUE SE HABLA DE COMO SE CUECEN 
GALLINAS EN EL PUCHERO[1], pp 102-103



Monday, September 18, 2017

PROHIBITIONS DE CULTURAS - CULTURAL PROHIBITIONS

Mock Cheese in White Sauce
Photo by: Lord-Williams
cultural prohibitions in worshiping of the three religions. During medieval Christians fast days were strictly observed. These included Fridays, Saturdays and Wednesdays, plus Lent and other days in the Christian calendar. This is due to the four humors. As they were thought to warm the body they were thought to diminish one’s ability to concentrate on spiritual values. Food prohibited included meat and its bi-products such as eggs, grease and dairy. 

The Jews had to wash his meat to insure all the blood was removed. The Berbers strictly forbid the consumption of alcoholic drinks. Muslims and Jews could not eat pork, rabbit, scaleless fish or shellfish. 

[Bolens. 1990:45; and Gitlitz. 1999:99]

See blog titled cebo published September 26, 2012 for a fish dish called
AMock Cheese For Lent adapted from Sent Soví Apè I #67 Formatgades, p 230


Wednesday, September 13, 2017

PRIMAL - SUCKLING PIG TO MELT IN YOUR MOUTH



A Roast to Melt in Your Mouth
The Medieval Spanish Chef is too poor for a whole pigglet
Photo by: Lord-Williams
primal, a suckling pig from six to nine months (69-103.5 k.) until reaches adult weight, 130- 170 k. at 18 months (the weaning age) when is slaughtered see cerdo. [Sanz. 1967:51]

See blog titled cochinillo published March 13, 2013 for Medieval Spanish Chef’s recipe for suckling pig to melt in your mouth.

Monday, September 11, 2017

PRIETO WITH A CHICKEN A WINE SAUCE RECIPE

uva prieto picudo
Photo from: la chaninguva
prieto picudoprieta, Leon preto, 1. firm (meat). 2. firm strong dark grapes used to produce wines from southern León; mature hard, sweet grapes. The wine made from them has a low alcohol content, oscillating between 12-13.5%. It is cherry colored with oregano tones. It has an intense, clean, natural and fruity aroma while the pungent state leaves the natural carbon on the tongue as a result of fermentation.  mature hard, sweet grapes. This wine is cherry colored with oregano tones. It has an intense, clean, natural and fruity aroma while the pungent state leaves the natural carbon on the tongue as a result of fermentation. [Ares. “Comidas.” 1994: 122; Garrote Alonso. 1947:298; Germán. 1994:195; Llamas. 1994:167; and Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:144; Ruíz/Brey. 1965:386b:89 and Ruíz/Saíz. 1986:1281c:217]


A THICKEN CHICJEN DISH TRANSALTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #309 PLATO ESPESADO DE GALLINA, p 172


Ingredients

Slowly cooking chicken in wine sauce
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 hen 
10 hard boiled eggs[1]
1 lb yeast[2] or 1 lb honey
¼ lb murri
¼ lb vinegar
¼ lb oil
2 dirhams or 1½ tsp pepper
1 dirham ¾  tsp cumin
2 sprigs thyme[3]
salt to taste
½ c flour

Garnish

1 tsp white pepper
½ c flour (optional)
4 egg whites

Chicken with Toasted Egg White
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Select a fat hen and clean it. Put it in a pot with hard boiled eggs, shelled to look like meatballs, 1 lb yeast or 1 lb honey which is better and sweeter, ¼ lb each of: vinegar, oil and murri, 1 ½ tsp pepper, ¾ tsp cumin, 2 sprigs of thyme and salt to taste. Cover the pot with a lid and seal the lid was a paste made with water and flour. Leave an air hole. Break raw eggs over the hole. Then slowly cook over charcoal until done. Turn it out and sprinkle with pepper. It is very good covered with egg white mixed with flour.



[1] Perry omits this ingredient.  The Medieval Spanish Chef reduced it to one envelope or 10 grams.
[2] Perry says wine not yeast. In order to incorporate ½ l. dark red wine, it was added to 1 c honey.
[3] Perry says several.

Friday, September 8, 2017

POTE WITH 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR ONION POTTAGE

1. pot. Each region of Spain has its own pot or stew, pote or olla usually containing cooked chickpeas or fava beans, vegetables and meats. It is the forerunner of the fast food section by throwing everything into the same pot. It is said that no regional pot, however, is copied after another or descend from another, just as regional birds are not. 2. pottage. See pota. [Villar. 1994:182]

POTTAGE WHICH IS  PARRIOLA (AN ONION SAUCE) ADAPTED
FROM NOLA’S xxvii-3 POTAGE QUE SE DIZE PARRIOLA

Ingredients

Refreshingly Delicious
Photo by: Lord-Williams
2 onions
salt to taste
lard for frying
spices such as 1 tsp cinnamon, 
½  tsp nutmeg, 1 tbsp ginger
1 qt broth
4 egg yolks (optional)
2 chicken livers (optional)

Preparation

Finely chop onion on a cutting board. Sprinkle with ground salt and cold water. Squeeze the onions between two cutting boards to remove the viscosidad. Repeat this operation 3 or 4 times while chopping.

Then scald the onion in boiling water three or four times, squeezing out the viscosidad between scaldings.

Heat lard in a frying pan. Gently fry onions. Add spices and broth- Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and gently boil. Add egg yolks and mashed chicken livers optional.




                              NOLA’S XXVII-3 POTAGE QUE SE DIZE PARRIOLA







Wednesday, September 6, 2017

POTASA - SOAP MADE WITH POTASH

 zymrgst
Producing Potash
Ar. ushnān, Mid. Dutch potaschen, Eng. potash. A method of making potassium carbonate (K2). In medieval times it was made into soap used by dinners to wash their hands before and after meals. Seven Arab recipes for making it have been found in their manuscripts. They used soda from perfumed vegetable ash. By 800, Triana, a suburb of Seville, was the first a major producer of potash soap. 

Potash is produced by leaching ashes and sea plants and then evaporating the resulting solution in large pots. Sea plants were the primary ingredient in Triana. The reside left us called “pot ash”. This was boiled with
olive oil, soda and lime. It could be scented with almond oil, Rosemary and other herbs and spices. Triana was known for it boiling pots leaching the ashes.

In the photo above shows ashes being steeped from a wood fire to leach out caustic soda. The liquid runs into a cauldron where it is boiled to reduce water content. 

[ES: Flicker. Potash. Aug 4, 17; ES: Wikipedia.org/Potash; and Rodison. “Studies.” 2001:145]