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Wednesday, February 25, 2015

HERVIR WITH 4TH C RECIPE FOR MUSSELS

Mussels Boiling in Broth
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCast bullir, heruirhirvir, Leon fervir, Eng to boil. [Alonso Luengo. 1994:96; Dialecto. 1947:234:248; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:261; Nola/Iranzo. 1982:169; and Nola/Pérez. 1994:199]

IX. MUSSELS ADAPTED FROM APICUIS IX:IX, p 213

2 tbsp murri[1]
1 leek
1 tsp cumin
1 savory[2]
2 lbs. mussels
1 passum[3]
Possitively Delicious!
Photo by: Lord-Williams


Preparation

Chop the leek and the herbs. Put all the ingredients in a pot. Add enough water to cover the mussels. Bring to a boil. As soon as the mussels open remove from heat. Remove the vacant shell and serve the mussel in the other shell.[4]

APICIUS’ THE ROMAN COOKERY BOOK
THE LATIN VERION OF IX:IX: IN MITULIS, p. 212
IN MITULIS: liquamen, porrum concisum, cuminum, passum, satureiam, vinum, mixtum facies aquatius et ibi mitulos coques.  . . .  (430)

FLOWER’S ENGLISH VERSION
OF IX:IX: MUSSELS, p 213
Mix liquamen, chopped leek, cumin, passum, savory, and wine, dilute the mixture with water, and cook mussels in it.



[1] See blog titled almorí, published August 25, 2011 for recipe.

[2] Thyme is a substitute.
[3] Raisin wine, wine made from semi-dried grapes. As it was not found, regular wine was used instead.
[4] Normally fresh lemon is squeezed over the mussels at this point but it must be remembered that Romans did not have lemons.

Monday, February 23, 2015

HENDERLA WITH 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR BROILDED CONGER EEL

 
Conger eel after sliting back and stomach
to remove bones and entails
Photo by: Lord-Williams
to cut it, split it, divide it; to divide in half to slash meat without dividing it; to make a groove like in a peach. To have a slitting headache. To split hairs. To be very sharp. [Castro. Alimentación. 1996:299; Covarrubias. 1998:682:a3-9; Nola. 1989: xlvi-2:lxii-4; and Nola/Pérez. 1994:199]

BROILED CONGER EEL ADAPTED FROM NOLA'S lxi-3 CONGRIO COCIDO


Ingredients


1 large conger eel

¼
c olive oil
1 tbsp salt


Conger Eel with
Sauce Boat in the Shape of an Eel
Photo by: Lord-Williams

For the sauce:

2 oranges

¼ tsp white pepper
½
tsp salt
1 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp chopped mint
1 tbsp chopped parsley

Preparation

Small conger eel is not good except for roasting
< Slit the belly open and remove the bones. Remove the fins. Make a slit in the top and remove the bones and inners. Wash it.

Put alumunin foil on a baking dish. Put olive oil in a cup and paint the foil with the oil. Place the conger on the baking dish. Paint it with the olive oil. Sprinkle with salt. Grill it 20 minutes. Baste if necessary.

Make a sauce:

Put all the ingredients in a food processor. Chop the herbs well. Pour this into a saucepan and heat.

When the fish is ready, serve it on a platter with the sauce on the side.



LIBRO DE COCINA RUPHERTO DE NOLA AÑO MDXXV

LIBRO DE COCINA RUPHERTO DE NOLA
PEREZ’ TRANSLACIÓN AL CASTELLANO MODERNO
lxi1-4 CONGRIO EN PARRILLAS EN EL ASADOR, p 166
Si el congrio fuere pequeño y lo quieren asar en el asador no es menester despedazarlo, sino pasarlo por medio; y hacienda así como es costumbre y después tomar una caña; y henderla por medio y haz que el un pedazo sea de un cabo, y el otro del otro y átala con un hilo, de manera que no pueda caer, y untarla has con aceite a menudo y si lo haces en parrillas cortarlo a la medida de las parrillas a la larga y hácerse así a su placer; y después hacerle su salserón con zumo de naranjas y con pimiento y sal y aceite; y de todas las buenas yerbas cortadas menudas, y todo esto sea puesto dentro de una ollica pequeña y cuando quisieren comer echar la vianda en el plato y echarla la dicha salsa.

CONGER EEL ON THE GRILL AND ON THE SPIT
TRANSLATED BY LADY BRIGHID NI CHIARAIN
If the conger eel is small and you want to roast it on the spit, it is not necessary to cut it into pieces, only pass [the spit] through the middle; and doing this as is customary; and then take a cane and break it in half, and make it so that one piece is at one end and the other [piece] at the other [end]; and tie it with a thread, in such a manner that it cannot fall, and grease it frequently with oil; and if you make it on the grill, cut it lengthwise according to the measure of the grill; and in this way make it according to your pleasure; and then make your thin sauce with orange juice, and with pepper, and salt, and oil, and with all the good herbs cut small; and this should be put into a small little pot; and when they want to eat, cast the food on the plate, and cast on the aforesaid sauce.


[1] This is the almost the same recipe Nola uses for Grlled Swordfish, lix-1. See blog titled galludo published October 10, 2014

Friday, February 20, 2015

HELENIO WITH 14TH C RECIPE FOR SNEEZEWORT IN EGGS

Elecampane
Photo from: jdubois50
hierba de ala, L. Inula helenium, Ar. rasīn, Fr. grande aunée or aunée officinale, MEng elena campana, Eng. elecampane inula, Helen-flower, sneezewort. It is fabled that the name of this hardy perennial composite legume, with large clusters of yellow flowers, is symbolic of Helen of Troy’s tears. This species is a native of central Asia. The Arabs cultivated elecampane in Sevillan gardens.

During the Middle Ages it was very popular. The English made a dish of boiled and ground elecampane roots mixed with eggs. The roots were removed from the plant in autumn, when it was two or three years old and after the flowers and stems were candied. The roots, flowers and stems were sold candied in English and Spanish apothecary shops to help digestion and relieve asthma. Laguna called it “Saracen mint” for its appearance but it has no aroma. It was said that this plant was so bitter that it made anyone forget personal anguish or distress to the point that it caused mirth.

elecampane potion
Photo from leaf watoru DSC_0489

It was believed that it conserved the beauty of the body and it aroused genital virtue. It was used in syrups and infusions. Most of the plant was used medicinally for the resin, pectin and oil content to abate pain.

Today, it is used for allergies, including skin affections. It was used to combat dropsy, to alleviate sheep affected with scab and horses suffering from cutaneous diseases. The root was consumed as lozenges to elevate whooping cough. It is sold as a sweetmeat, lozenges, capsules and tablets. [Bremnes. 1990:87; Curye. 1985: IV:80:116: V17:154:185; ES: Fitzmaurice. Mar 18, 02; and Font. Plantas. 1999:561:785-78]

ELECAMPANE IN EGGS ADAPTED FROM IV: CURYE ON INGLYSCH
80. ELAT. p 116[1]


Alantwurzel (elecampane root)
Photo from: mary
Ingredients

elecampane roots
4 eggs
1 tsp saffron
½ tsp salt
1 tsp duke’s powder

Preparation

Put elecampane roots in boiling water. Leave it into soft enough to mash. Grind it well in a mortar or food processor. Put it in a pot and mix it with eggs, saffron mashed and diluted with a little raw egg and salt. Do not let it boil. When the eggs are set, sprinkle with duke’s powder and serve.

IV: CURYE ON INGLYSCH
HIATT #80. ELAT, p116

Take elena campana and see< font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 10.5pt; mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">þ it in water. Take it vp and grynde it wel in a morter. Temper it vp with ayren, safroun, and salt, and do it ouer the fire, and lat it not boile; cast above powdour douce and serue it forth.
 

IV 80 THE MEDEIVAL SPANISH CHEF’S
MODERN ENGLISH VERSION

Take elecampane and boil it in water. Take it out and grind it well in a mortar. Mix it with eggs, saffron, and salt, and do it over the fire, and et it not boil. Sprinkle with duke’s powder and serve it.


[1] This recipe was not tried due to the impossibility of finding elecampane roots.

Wednesday, February 18, 2015

HAZ WITH MOJI OR EGGPLANT CASSEROLE RECIPE

Separating Seeds from Pulp of Eggplant
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Hisp Ar. mahshi, L. facies (face), Eng 1 “face,” topping, coating, covering or crust on top of other ingredients in a casserole. which can mean a face, a visage, a façade or the top side of a fabric. The meaning here is to make a coating or crust on the top of the eggplant mixture in the casserole. 2. tied herbs, wheat, firewood or similar items, see atado con un hilo. [Anón/Huici. 1969:63:46-47:64:47:338:188 etc.; ES: Carroll-Mann. Guisados 2-art. Jun 6, 01:102:ftn 94; Nola. 1989:xli-1; and Nola/Pérez. 1994:199]

MOJI CASSEROLE[1] ADAPTED FROM NOLA xli-1 CAZUELA MOXI MUY BUENA
CAZUELA MOJI

Ingredients

2 med eggplants
3 tbsps oil
2 slices toasted bread
2 c manchego and parmesan grated cheese
½ tsp coriander
1 tso caraway
½ tsp pepper
1 tsp cloves
1 tsp ginger
4 eggs
1 tsp saffron

Garnish:
a drizzle of honey
duke’s powder[2]

Preparation

A Delightful Dish
Phto by: Lord-Williams
Select medium size eggplants. Wash them. Put them in water with salt to taste and bring the water to a boil. Reduce heat and boil gently until cooked. Remove from heat and strain them. Discard the skin and stems. Remove seed sacs. Chop the pulp well.

Heat a frying pan, add oil and brown the pulp in it. Grate toasted the bread and add half of it to the frying pan. Add half the aged grated cheese. Blend all well. Add coriander, caraway, half the pepper, half the cloves and a little ginger. Mix well.

Beat 2 eggs and add them to the frying pan, stir until set.

Grease a casserole with oil. Add the mixture from the frying pan.

Beat 2 more eggs. Add 1 tsp mashed and dissolved saffron, the rest of pepper, cloves, breadcrumbs and cheese. Top the eggplant with this mixture. Dot it with raw egg yolks

PREHEAT OVEN TO 400ºF/200ºC

Cover the pot. Bake in a conventional oven or try the medieval way of placing the coals on top of the lid instead of under the pot.

Leave 20-30 minutes until the egg yolks have solidified. Remove from heat and serve immediately.

LIBRO DE COCINA RUPHERTO DE NOLA AÑO MDXXV



CAZUELA MOJI
TRANSLATED INTO CASTILLEAN FROM CATALAN BY DIONISIO PERÉZ
Tomar las berenjenas no muy grandes ni muy pequeñas, sino medianas; y abrirlas por medio y echarlas a cocer con su sal, y desque estén bien cocidas escurrirlas con un àño que sea basto; y después picarlas mucho, y echarlas en una sartén o cazo y échale buena cosa de aceite; y tomar pan y rallarlo y tostado, echárselo allí dentro y echarle queso añejo rallado y desque esté bien rato traído sobre la lumbre, tener molido culantro seco alcaravea y pimienta y clavos; y un poquito de gingibre, y traerlo sobre la lumbre y échale allí unos huevos; y traerlo sobre la lumbre hasta que esté duro y después tomar una cazuela y echarle un poquito de aceite; y asentarlo en ella,  y batir unos huevos con pimienta y azafrán y clavos, y del mismo pan tostado que lleva dentro la cazuela y de queso rallado; y hacerlo espeso y asentarlo encima a manera de haz y ponerle sus yemas, y cuajarlo en el horno o con una cuajadera, que es cobertera de hierro con brasas encima; y desque esté cuajada, quitarla de la lumbre y echarle una escudilla de miel que sea muy buena por encima y su pólvera duque. Esta misma cazuela se puede hacer de acelgas o de zanahorias.
                                                         MOJI CASSEROLE
TRANSLATED BY LADY BRIGHID NI CHIARAIN
FROM NOLA’S CAZUELA MOJI

Take eggplants, neither very big nor very small, but middling, and open them in the middle and cast them to cook with your salt; and when they are well-cooked, drain them with a cloth which is rough; and then chop them a great deal, and cast them in a frying-pan or kettle and cast in a good deal of oil; and take toasted bread and grate it, cast it there within, and cast in aged grated cheese; and when it is stirred for a good while over the fire, have ground dry coriander, caraway, and pepper, and cloves, and a little ginger, and stir it over the fire; and cast in some eggs, and stir it over the fire until it is hard; and then take a casserole, and cast in a little bit of oil, and place it in [the casserole]; and beat some eggs with pepper, and saffron, and cloves, and some of the same toasted bread that is contained in the casserole, and some of the grated cheese; and make it thick and place it on top in the manner of a facing (94) and put your yolks on it; and coagulate it in the oven or with a cuajadera, which is an iron pot-lid with coals on top, and when it is coagulated, remove it from the fire; and cast on top of it a dish of honey which is very good and your duke's powder (95). This same casserole can be made from chard or carrots.




[1] Lady Brighid ni Chiarain states that Grewe points out that this dish appears in the Anon 13th C Al-Andalus MS under its original Arabic name mahshi. Indeed there are are six recipes for mahshi.

[2] See blog titled cardamomo published August 16, 2012 for recipe.