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Wednesday, November 30, 2011

ASADO DE CABRITO WITH 13TH C ROAST KID GOAT RECIPE

roast kid. The Hispano-Arabs preferred kid to any other meat. Kids were hung, head down for a couple of days before roasting to facilitate digestion. Anon Andalus claims the best of roasts is an entire side of a kid in a pan, which keeps the moisture and fat in the bottom of the pan. It also gives a recipe for a type of kid meatloaf and fried strips of meat. The Archpriest of Hita indicates that kid was a meat commonly consumed by Jews and Christians and highly thought of with beef and lamb. For large parties, Christians roasted kid whole and sometimes stuffed them as seen in Sent Soví and Nola.  Sent Soví calls for a kid roasted on a spit in its skin. During the second half of roasting time, it is made golden brown by painting the skin with an egg yolk. Villena explains how to remove the stuffing and carve it. [Anón/Grewe. 1982:IIII:55:X:69; Anón/Huici.1966:19:24-25:147:99:250:149-150 etc; Nola. 1989:xiii; Ruíz/Brey. 1965:772b:134:1085a:176:1185ª:187; and Villena/Calero. 2002:36a-36b]


ROAST KID GOAT IN A TAJINE ADAPTED FROM
HUICI’S TRANSLATION IN ANÓN AL ANDALUS, 19 ASADO EN SARTÉN, pp 24-25
For 6-8 persons


As you can see in the picture, the goat had been cleaned.
(It will be cut in half by sliding a wire down the backbone)
Photo from: realfoodfans.com
Ingredients

1 side of a 6 ½-8 ½lb baby goat
1 lb butter
1 c chopped onion
1 tbsp black pepper
1 tsp white pepper
1 tbsp salt
1 c dry white wine
3 tbsp lemon juice
4 garlic cloves

Garnish:
1 tbsp salt
1 tbsp freshly ground pepper
1 tbsp cinnamon

Preparation

Preheat oven to 275º F / 135º C  (a clay oven is recommended)

Roast Kid Leg
Photo from: 
Brendan Plant
Melt butter a saucepan. Add wine, pepper, salt, onion and garlic. Simmer for bout 15 minutes until all the flavors are well blended. Wash the side of the goat in cold water. Pat dry. Put the goat in a tajine or large roasting pan. Baste with ½ - ¾ of the sauce. Cover and roast for 2 hours. Turn the goat over. Baste with the sauce and cook 2 more hours. 

Remove it from the oven and sprinkle it with salt ground with pepper and cinnamon.

The Anon Al-Andalus explains that it is the best way to cook it because the fat and the moisture stay in the bottom of the pan and nothing is lost in the fire as in roasts on a spit.




Tuesday, November 29, 2011

ASABORIRLO (OCat) WITH 15TH C CHICKEN LIVER SOUP RECIPE

Cast asaborarlo, Eng to flavor, to give flavor to, to enjoy eating a drinking with peculariar pleasure. [Nola. xiii-3]

CHICKEN LIVER SOUP ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S
RECIPE FOR PEACOCK SAUCE #xiii-3 LIZA EN CAÇUELA
For 5 persons

Chicken Liver Soup ...
Photo from: worldsoups.com
Ingredients

1 lb peacock or chicken livers  
6 c water
1 lb toasted almonds
1 lb crustless toasted bread soaked in orange juice of white vinegar
2 egg yolks

Flavor with:
1 tsp salt
½ tsp pepper
¾” fresh ginger, chopped very finely
1 tsp mashed saffron
3 tbsp fresh coriander or 1 tsp powder
½ c sugar

Garnish:
sugar
cinnamon
1 tbsp chopped mint

Preparation

Cover chicken livers with the water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer and cook 10-15 minutes until tender. Grind almonds in a blender.  Add livers and the bread. Continue grinding. Add the water from chicken livers. Add egg yolks. Strain all through a cheese cloth into a saucepan. Flavor it with spices and sugar. Taste for sourness. It should be moderate. Cook until sugar is dissolved and the liquid as absorbed the flavor of the spices. Pour into soup bowls and sprinkle sugar and cinnamon over each and enjoy!

Monday, November 28, 2011

ARVEJÓN

Fabaceae: Vicia lutea (Yellow-vetch) 07Jun07
Photo by: Moonmoths
L. Vicia lutea, Eng. yellow vetch. It is an annual legume growing 20-50 cm. high. It is common in the eastern half of Spain, the largest producer being Barcelona, but it grows all over. According to Gázquez, it was used more frequently than bitter vetch (see arveja) to make pottages and eaten as a form of penitence. During the famine in Castile 1434-35, vetch was reduced to flour and consumed instead of bread. It was also used in Muslim Spain during times of crisis. Like garlic, it was considered to be a peasant product. [Castro. Alimentación. 1996:116:149:151:201:204:205; Enci Espasa. 1996:6:ARD:617; and Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:67]

Friday, November 25, 2011

ARVEJA, THE HEALTH PEA


LA QUERIDA: Nell Gwyn
(The lover Nell Gwyn to whom Charles II gave “health peas” to prevent her from getting plump.)
From: lacuevadesusana.blogspot.com

Vicia ervilia
From: wikipedia.org

forrajera, semillas de algarroba, veza, L. Vicia ervilia, Eng. 1. bitter vetch, health pea. It grows profusely throughout Spain. It is cultivated there. In the Middle Ages, peasants and the poor added these greens to pottages and soups like chickpeas. When the grain is split it looks like a red lentil. It is not confused as it is so bitter it must be boiled several times to remove its bitterness. Flour was made from the seeds. Vetch did not reach noble tables except for those of Charles II of England's mistresses. It is said that he gave them the "health pea" to prevent them from getting plump! The tubers were cut up to make a potion. In general vetch was included in Lenten menus and monastic diets. Both the plant and the bean have proved to be excellent feed for livestock and pigeons for their nutritious value and because they are easily digestible. Commonly, it has been used as an emollient. 2. L. Pisum sativum, Chile arveja, Eng pea, see guisante. [Covarrubias. 1998:154:b:46; Espasa. 1996:6:ARD:616-617; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:67:93-94; Laza. 2002:100; and Ruíz/Brey.1965:1164b:185]

Thursday, November 24, 2011

ARULLAR WITH 15TH C RECIPE FOR LIVER FRITTERS

to make the “ro ro ro” sound, to put the baby to sleep by singing a lullaby; to make the sound of pigeons and doves in love; to talk sweetly and smoothly of someone in love. See rorolas. [Nola. 1989:xlii-4]

“ROROLAS” OF LIVERS WHICH ARE FRITTERS ADAPTED FROM NOLA #xlii-4
ROROLAS DE HIGADOS QUE ES FRUTA DE SARTEN
fritters from the liver in the pan
Photo by: vkusno-i-prosto.ru


Ingredients

1 lb chicken livers (kid liver can also be used)
1 lb toasted bread
½ c white vinegar
½ c rosewater
8 eggs
1 lb cheese
1 tbsp dried, toasted and ground mint
¼ tsp ground saffron
>½ tsp ground cumin
1 tsp coriander
1 liter olive oil or lard

Garnish:
cinnamon
sugar

Preparation

PREHEAT OVEN AT 325º F / 160 º C

Remove tendons from livers. Grease a baking dish and pile livers 2” thick and bake 40 min or until firm.

Soak toasted bread in vinegar and rosewater.

Grind livers, bread, eggs and cheese together. Add the mint and spices. Mix well. 

Heat the oil or lard to deep fry the mixture. Roll (or ro ro ro) ladles filled with the mixture in the oil or lard and fry until golden brown.

Sprinkle cinnamon and sugar over the fritters and serve.   


Wednesday, November 23, 2011

ARTESA WITH 13TH C LAMB PATTY RECIPE

OCast dorna, Eng troth, wooden container for kneading dough, mixing minced pork with seasoning and pickle sauces, to etc. Troths are made by hollowing out tree trunks. They are set on sawhorses. In the 10th C, they were sold, in the market of León by women from Tornarios, León. [Baena/Dutton. 1993:305:554:v216; ES: Dic popular. Jun 6, 02:2; Pers. Memories. Slaughters Mostoles. 2000, 2001, 2003; and Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:47:130:192]  

RECIPE FOR MAKING AHRASH, FRIED LAMB PATTIES
ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF
ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #2 RECETA PARA HACER “AHRAŠ,” p. 16
For 4 persons

Lamb Patties with couscous
Photo by: katbaro

Ingredients

1 lb ground lamb
*1 tbsp Byzantine murri
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 tsp coriander seed
salt and pepper to taste
¼ c flour
2 tbsp oil

For the sauce:
¼ c vinegar
¾ c oil
1 garlic clove minced
*1 tsp Byzantine murri
1 tsp mustard
¼ c raisins

Preparation

In a bowl, mix the lamb and other ingredients. Knead all well and make 4 patties. Thinner than a pita. (If making for a crowd, a kneading trough will be necessary.)

Fry patties 5 minutes on each side, or until done.

Make a sauce with the ingredients, above, and serve with the patties.

Served with coucous is a North African dish still typical today.

*See almorí for recipe.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

ARROZ PILAFF WITH 15TH C RICE PILAF RECIPE

Ar. mufalfal, Eng. rice pilaf, a method of cooking rice after careful washing, boiling and finally steaming to insure that no grains stick to each other. This has been translated incorrectly from Arabic as “peppered rice” but pepper was never included as an ingredient in medieval recipes for it. Perhaps it was named for the rice grains as they look like peppercorns. Perry describes a dish of Rizz Mufalfal consisting of a large quantity of rice and boiled meat. Chickpeas maybe added and after straining off the water, melted fat is then mixed into the concoction. Pullar points out that rice pilaf is a prime example refuting the myth that food was over spiced in the Middle Ages.  [Perry.“Kitāb.” 2001:472; and Pullar. 1970:242]


RIZZ MUTALFAL - RICE PILAF, ADAPTED FROM THE 15TH C KITĀB AL-ṬIBĀKHA, “THE BOOK OF THE FEMALE COOK” FROM DAMASCUS
Rice Pilaf
Photo by: 
cookbookman17
For 4 persons

Ingredients

1 c long grain rice
1 lb lamb or beef cut in cubes
4 tbsp samneh, butter or shortening
1 garlic clove crushed
1 tsp salt

Preparation

If rice is purchased in bulk from an Arab market, soak in hot water ½ hr. Rinse thoroughly to remove surface starch which will make finished pilaf gummy.  If packaged rice it is normally prewashed.

Melt 2 tbsp samneh in a heavy frying pan. Stir garlic into the samneh. Add the rice and stir fry on high heat. Add the meat and brown.

When all the rice grains are covered with samneh and the meat is browned, add 2 c the water and salt. Bring this to a boil and reduce heat to low. Cook about 15 minutes until water is absorbed. It may be necessary to add ¼ c more water.

Remove from heat and cover for about 20 minutes letting rice finish cooking in its own steam.  Melt the remaining samneh and pour over the rice mixture. Fluff the rice with a fork and serve.

Monday, November 21, 2011

ARROZ WITH RECIPE FOR JASHÎSHA, HARDY 13TH C CHICKPEA, RICE & CRACKED WHEAT SOUP

Rice
(almost ready for harvesting)
Photo by:
Marlis1

OCat aròs, haròs, ros, arroç, Cat arròs, Gr. oruza,  L. Oryza sativa, Ar. aruzz, Eng. rice. Some sources state that rice was cultivated in 7000 BC in the Yangtze Valley of China while others maintain that it was a native the southern foothills of the east Himalayas in India and not documented until 2500 BC. Others state that it did not reach SE Asia and central China until 2000 BC, while others maintain that it was in 3000 BC. Remains found in the Yangtze Valley are only 8,500 years old. Rice spread to and around the Mediterranean to North Africa. It could be grown in deserts in like those in Saudi Arabia and in flood paddies like those in Valencia, Spain. The Byzantines brought it to Iberia. It was forgotten due to lack of cultivation until the Muslims re-introduced it. It was so popular amongst the Moors that when they came to Spain they brought it in sacks. The first record of its cultivation is in Seville and then, Cordova, Granada, Murcia, Alicante and Tarragona. It was common in Murcia by the 13th C. During the 14th C, Jews and Hispano-Muslims ate it more frequently than Christians. By the 15 C, due to the influence of Murcia, rice became an exotic dish. In the 16th C, it was part of Spanish cuisine. Rice made headway at first for its medicinal uses. It is hot in the first degree and dry in the second. It creates constipation and boiled with almond milk it is most beneficial; the grain cleans the body. During the 8th C. Valencians found it bland at first but began adding local ingredients such as snails, duck, partridge and frogs and vegetables in season. These dishes were the forerunners of paella and other rice specialty dishes for which Valencia under the Franco Regime in the 20th C. They did not add seafood, although around Malaga, Cadiz and Seville shellfish were included. A royal chef of the English court during the 12 C. recorded the first rice recipe. There it was thought precious like spices and sugar and considered it a medicinal food. Rice was added to blancmanges, main courses, desserts, alcoholic beverages and special dishes for religious ceremonies. It is low in fat and nitrogenous matter and high in carbohydrates. It is ¾ of the total diet for millions of people throughout the world today. The ancient Chinese said, "a meal without rice is like a beautiful woman with only one eye." It is said that the Chinese have gone out of their way to confirm the symbolic meaning of rice, which is “fertility” (see manjar blanco). [Anón/Grewe. 1982:XXXXVIIII:93:ftn 1:L:94: Apè III:236 etc; ES: “Rice.” Feb 03; Gázquez. 2002:101-102; and Ibn Razin/Marín. 2007:29]


GOOD JASHÎSHA, A HARDY SOUP TO FATTEN THIN WOMEN AND MEN
ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #399
ŶAŠIŠA BUENA; ENGORDA A LAS MUJERES Y A LOS HOMBRES DELGADOSpp 218-219

Chickpea Rice Soup
Photo by: 
isachandra
Ingredients

1 c small chickpeas 
1 tsp baking soda
1 c rice
1 c cracked wheat
1 tsp basil
1 tsp oregano
1 tsp thyme
1 tsp freshly ground
salt to taste
meat broth made with chicken, lamb or beef and root vegetables (onion, carrots parsley root and/or celery root)
2 tsp butter
2 tbsp lamb fat

Preparation

Cover chickpeas with water, add baking soda and soak overnight. Rinse chickpeas and put them in a pot with cracked wheat and rice. Add  2 cups water, herbs, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and simmer until done. Do not cover. If long grain rice it should take about 20 minutes. Make a meat broth. Add butter and lamb fat into it and continue heating until melted. Put the rice mixture in soup bowls and pour the broth over them. Sipping it slowly to greatly increases one’s strength.

Friday, November 18, 2011

ARROPE WITH 13TH C FIG SYRUP RECIPE FOR ICE CREAM AND SWEET DESSERTS

Ar. rubb (fruit juice boiled until it thickens), Eng 1. fruit syrup. It is made with fruit juice and honey or sugar. 2. boiled musk, used in the elaboration of full-bodied wines. 3. a sweet boiled in pieces of musk. 4. clarified honey. See almíbar, jarabe and sirope. [Anón/Huici.1966:541:293:542:293:543:293; Baena/Dutton. 1993:586:748:v380; Corominas. Cat. 1980:I:A:358-359; and Delgado. 1994:33]

FIG SYRUP ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF 
ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #543 ARROPE DE HIGOS, p 293
Crostino Fichi, Squaqua e...
(+ pouched figs & fig syrup)
Photo by: Carmelita Cookitaly
Excellent topping for ice cream, waffles, pancakes & other sweet desserts:


Ingredients

about 3 doz or 8 lbs black mature figs to yield 4 qts juice
1 ½ sugar
3 c water
3 tbsp butter
3 tbsp lemon juice

Preparation

Select figs and peel. Put them in a saucepan with sugar, water and butter. Bring to a boil until it is reduced to ¼ of the liquid. Stir in lemon juice. Stir constantly until the mixture thickens and bubbles. Remove from heat and be exalted!

Thursday, November 17, 2011

ARROBA WITH 13TH C QURSAS, SWEET FLATBREAD WITH HONEY & NUTS

a liquid measure of 32 pints. By the 15th C. in Castile, wine was measured in arrobas. Wheat flour and other solids could be sold by the arroba, i.e. 25 lbs. [Castro. Alimentación. 1996:252; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:33 ftn 58; and Moreno.1988:496]


QURSAS, SWEET FLATBREAD WITH HONEY AND NUTS RECIPE
FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS
#169, RECETA DE NECESIDADES DE PAN DULCE, p  110
This recipe is very similar to the Fadalat recipe for flatbread #52 Alcorzas rellenas, pp 21-22, see ALMIZCLE, published On August 23, 2011 and a variation of the same in ALCORZA, published July 11, 2011


dsc01213
Photo by: tornadogrrrl
Ingredients 

20 egg yolks
1 lb wheat flour (1/25 of 1 arroba)
1 tbsp oil
2 c honey
½ c almonds
½ walnuts
¼ c sugar
¼ c pine nuts

Preparation

Beat egg yolks add flour little by little kneading well. Add oil and water as needed. Make small thin found flatbreads like pita bread but smaller. Deep fry until they begin to brown. Place them in a serving dish.

Boil honey, skim off foam. Remove from heat. Add chopped almonds and walnuts and pour over the qursas. Sprinkle sugar and pine nuts on top and serve.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

ARRIEROS WITH 15TH C EEL TURNOVER RECIPE FROM NOLA

arrieros somos
(we are muleteers)
muleteers, existed in León from 1 AD. They were from the Maragato Region of León and were the link between the area to the outside world taking their goods to markets and purchasing other merchandise in exchange. Twice a year they exchanged grapes for rye, millet, barley, and wheat brought from outlying areas to León, the capital. They also took these products plus wine and oil from villages to weekly markets in the capital. They were famous for carrying lunch boxes filled with pork products, cocido from Leon (without leeks or carrots), codfish with rice, eel with garlic and cracklings. They stopped at roadside inns at the end of their meals to buy greasy soups, establishing the custom to have soup at the end of the meal in the Maragato Region. See Maragatería. [Alonso Luengo. 1994:39; Ares. “Las Comidias.” 1994:117:118:130; Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:48:54:115 etc; and Trapiello. 1994:135]

EEL TURNOVERS ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S RECIPE #lxi-1 CONGRIO FRESCO EN PAN
For 12 turnovers

Conger Eel, Beesands, South...
Photo by: Jim Linwood
Ingredients
2 lb conger eel

1 tsp ginger
1 ½ tsp salt
2 tsp pepper

1 tsp ground saffron
1/3 ice water
1 tbsp white vinegar
1 package of yeast
½ c butter

2 ¼ c flour
1 egg
6 garlic cloves mashed

Variation
1 lb chopped and fried onions.

Preparation

Scald the eel. Clean and wash it. Slice it and remove the bones. Season it with ginger, salt, and pepper.

Dissolve saffron in water. Mix this with vinegar, yeast butter, ginger, salt and pepper. Sift the flour and add it and the egg. Knead well. Let rest 20 minutes covered with a cloth.

Roll out the dough on a slightly floured surface and cut it in circles. Refrigerate at least 1 hour.

PREHEAT OVEN TO 375º F / 190ºC

Place the slices of eel in the circles of dough. Throughly mash garlic cloves. Sprinkle about 1/2 a clove over each turnover (add onions if using them) and fold the circle over to make it the shape of a half moon. Seal the edges shut by pressing down with the handle of a spoon.

Place the turnovers on a greased cookie sheet and bake 20 minutes or until done. Let cool and serve.

*Note: Nola makes one turnover as big as needed to fit the eel. The recipe above calls for individual turnovers for the muleteers to carry in their lunch boxes when traveling.






Tuesday, November 15, 2011

ARRELDE WITH 13th C “ŶILĪDĪYA” OR JALDIYYA GOOSE OR CHICKEN RECIPE


chicken nuts. ©Miko
Photo from: mikoflickr
His Ar. arr ‘gl, Ar. ratl, Eng. measurement, 1 ratl equals 12 ûqiyas. During the 13th C in Al-Andalus, 1 ratl equaled 468.75 gr, about one pound. During the grape harvest in 11th C León, butchers paid their tributes in ratls of suet. [ES: Anon/Perry. Sep 5 00:”Weights and Measures”; and Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:116]


  ŶILĪDĪYA or JALDIYYA LOOSELY TRANSLATED (Perry translates jaldiyya as "leathery fowl") GOOSE OR CHICKEN ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS RECIPE #60, HECHURA DE ŶILĪDĪYA CORREOSA, p 45

slices

Photo by: varf
Ingredients

1 2 lb goose or chicken
2 ratls or 2 lbs raisins
3 tbsp vinegar
2 tbsp oil
2 tsp pepper
1 tsp coriander
½ onion chopped
salt to taste
1/2 c skinned and chopped almonds
1/2 c chopped walnuts
1/2 c breadcrumbs
6 raw eggs
6 hard boiled eggs

Preparation

Clean the goose or chicken, remove the limbs and quarter it. Boil it in a pot. Put the raisins in a food processor and steep with 3 c water. Grind them. When the chicken is done remove the water in which it was cooked and strain the raisins into the pot with the chicken. Add vinegar, oil, half the pepper, coriander and onion. Salt to taste and continue cooking until sauce thickens. Add the nuts, breadcrumbs and the rest of the pepper.  Cover with 6 raw eggs beaten and cover, *turn off the heat and wait until the eggs harden and the fat rises. Serve with a garnish of hard boiled eggs.

*If using an open wood fire, after covering put it on the hearthstone and wait until the eggs harden. 




Monday, November 14, 2011

ARMUELLE, BLEDO MOLES WITH 13th C THARÎDA WITH LAMB, SPINACH AND CHEESE

Red mountain spinach
Photo by: Food from the Sky

armuelle, bledo moles, L. Atriplex hortense, Eng. mountain spinach, orach, garden orach. This plant is confused with amaranth as the two are very similar, see bledo de Europa. The leaves are eaten like spinach. Villanova recommended it with ewe’s cheese. As it is easy to digest, it is recommended especially for the elderly. Mountain spinach is a native of central Asia. It spread to Eastern Europe and Spain. Today it has been forgotten. [ES: “Orach.” Sep 19, 03; Font. Plantas. 1999:79:156-158; and Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:261]

THARÎDA WITH LAMB, *SPINACH AND CHEESE ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF AL-ANDALUS #374 TORTA CON CARNE DE CORDERO Y ESPINACAS, LECHE FRESCA Y MANTECA FRESCA, pp 205-206
This used to be made in Cordoba in the spring by the doctor Abu al-Hasan al-Bunani, God have mercy on him and pardon us and him.
For 4 persons


sauteing lamb 
 Photo bv: katie_poplin
Ingredients

2 ½ lb lamb cubed or 8 scrambled eggs
salt to taste
3 tbsp onion juice
1 tsp pepper
1 tsp coriander seed
1 tsp caraway
1/3 c olive oil
8-10 oz spinach
6 oz cheese cubed
4 tbsp butter
1 c breadcrumbs


Preparation

Sautee lamb in olive oil. Add salt, pepper, coriander seed, caraway and onion juice. When cooked add chopped and washed spinach. Add cheese and half the butter. When cooked add the rest of the butter and stir until melted. Make a bed of breadcrumbs in a serving dish, pour the spinach, cheese and meat over it. If lamb is not available, use eggs instead.

*None of the MSS call for mountain spinach. As spinach is interchangeable with Swiss chard and other greens, it is logical that it can be interchangeable with mountain spinach if on hand.


Friday, November 11, 2011

ARMARIO, ALACENA, RECÁMARA

ALACENA

Cord. taca, Ar. hazeña, Eng 1.  embedded kitchen cupboard. It first appeared in the 14th C becoming more frequent in the 15th C. 2. wardrobe, closet but non-existent in the Middle Ages. Trunks were used for clothes. [Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:30:ftn 34]

Thursday, November 10, 2011

ARMADA WITH 15TH C RECIPE FOR BARDED & NUT COVERED CHICKEN

a dish of baked poultry, named for its armour-like covering consisting of egg and honey or poultry wrapped in pastry to retain the moisture as in Nola’s recipes. It is discarded before serving. [Lladonosa. 1984:142-143; and Nola. 1989:xx-2:xx-3]

BARDED CHICKEN COVERED WITH ALMONDS AND PINE NUTS
ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S RECIPE #xx-3 CAPON ARMADO
For 4 persons

Baked Almond Chicken Recipe
Photo from: tasteofhome  
Ingredients

1 whole chicken
20 slices of barding fat or bacon, about 20 ozs
6 egg yolks
1 tbsp parsley
1 tbsp sugar
½ c pine nuts
½ c peeled and sliced almonds


Preparation

PREHEAT OVEN TO  425º F / 220º C

Bard the chicken. (For any questions see abardilla, how to bard.) Place it in a roasting pan and begin roasting. After about ½ hour, when half-roasted, remove the barding fat. Beat egg yolks beaten with parsley and sugar. Paint the entire chicken with the egg yolk mixture. Stick the nuts on the egg yolk mixture. Return the barding fat and finish baking the chicken. When baked, discard barding fat and carve.

Wednesday, November 9, 2011

ARIENCO (OCast) WITH 15TH C PUREED ROCKET RECIPE ADAPTED FROM NOLA

arugula/rocket
Photo By: Hey! Sam !!
 



Cat arienzo, Eng weight of 123 centigrams used in northern Aragon. [Nola. 1985:xlix-6; Nola/Iranzo.1982:167; and Nola/Pérez. 1994:189]

PUREED *ROCKET ANOTHER RECIPE ADAPTED FROM NOLA #xlix-6 ORUGA DE OTRA MANERA BUENA
For 12 persons


Ingredients 

1 lb rocket
1 qt red wine vinegar
3 qts honey
**8 l or 3 maravedis red wine
0.8 oz, 246 cg or 2 arienzos saffron

Saffron
(225,000 hand-picked stigmas from the saffron crocus make 1 lb)
Photo from Vibrant Spirit
Preparation

Purée young, tender rocket in a food processor. Add a little water if needed.  Place it in a air tight container with vinegar and let it soak for 6-8 days. Melt the honey in a saucepan by bringing it to a boil; and remove it from the heat. Add red wine. Put the rocket in a large saucepan. Pour the honey mixture over it, straining it through a sieve.  Heat the entire mixture, stirring constantly until it thickens. Remove from the heat. Add well ground saffron dissolved in red wine.

*Rocket is also called arugula.
**A compilation of Spanish and Mexican law, in relation to mines..., Volume 1, p 20 states that 3 maravedis are 2 half gallons. December 30, 2011.  

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

ARGÉNTEA, -0

silver plate
Photo by: CuboidCYBORG

silver or silver plated. Silver serving dishes or platters were commonly used in aristocratic homes and convents. [Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:149; and Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:142:152:187]

Monday, November 7, 2011

ARENQUE RECIPE FOR HERRINGS “SQUEEZED” IN A DOOR




Herring scad cruising the reef ...
Photo by: derekkeats
L. Clupea harengus, Eng. herring. They come from high northern latitudes in the spring. Large schools visit the Atlantic shores of Europe and the Bay of Biscay. The Archpriest speaks of those from Bermeo being eaten during a Jubilee Year. Bermeo is on the Atlantic Coast between San Sebastian and Santander. As per Villena, the meat is dry and salty. Adult fish are eaten cooked, dried, salted, jellied or smoked. [Multilingual. 1968:129-130; Ruíz/Brey. 1965:1112d:179; and Villena/Calero. 2002:39ª]

RECIPE FOR HERRINGS “SQUEEZED” IN A DOOR
(a mrsamper contribution recalling her father's procedure)
This recipe has several popular names: Civil the nickname of herrings in Spanish, De Cuba "from the barrel" as the fish are packed into wooden barrels. This is a product unknown to younger generations today.
For 2 persons

Arenques
Photo by:
viejozapato
Ingredients

6 herrings or “civils”
brown paper
a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil (picual variety of olives)
½ tsp chives chopped
½ tsp tarragon chopped
2 mashed garlic cloves

Preparation

Remove the heads from the herrings. Clean each thoroughly and wash in cold water. Wrap them individually in brown paper. Put each herring in the gap between door and the jamb. Gently but firmly close the door squeezing the herring. Repeat until all the herrings have been squeezed. (This makes it easier to remove the skin when ready to eat.) Remove the paper. Scrap off the scales from the fish. Pour a little olive oil over them and sprinkle with chives, tarragon and garlic. Serve with wine and bread. It makes for tasty d'oeuvres or a brilliant first course. 

Friday, November 4, 2011

ARCA, MAJÓN WITH 13TH C CHICKEN PIE RECIPE FROM SENT SOVÍ

Noah's Arc Baby Shower Cake

arca, mojón, 1. arc, a box to preserve the contents. Originally it was part of a hollowed out tree trunk, i.e. part of an arch or curve which could be made into a trunk or a boat. 2. limited area of a municipal territory, marked by stones or some other means. See fiambreras. [Dialecto. 1947:145-146; and Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:130]

CHICKEN PIE  ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ 
#CXXXIIII QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FFER PANADES DE POLS, O DE QUÈ·T VULLES, AB ALIDEM, pp 155-156

Ingredients

Antique Lunch Box
Photo from: etsy.com
Pastry:
2 ½  c all purpose flour
½ tsp salt
1 c shortening
1 egg
1 tbsp white vinegar
1 ½ c cold water

Filling:

1 chicken about 3 lb
1 tsp thyme
1 tsp saffron mashed
¼ tsp freshly ground pepper
6-8 slices of bacon
½ c chicken broth
1 egg
5 tbsp unsweetened grape juice or orange juice

Preparation

Preheat oven to 375º F / 190º C

Make the pastry in a large bowl by mixing the flour and salt. Cut the shorteneing into the flour until the size of peas. Lightly beat the egg and add it to the mixture. Add vinegar and add the water a little at a time. It should have just enough water to hold the dough together. Roll out a ¼” thick crust and divide it in half. Place one half in a square pie or cake tin. Trim the edges and prick it with a fork.

Parboil the chicken. Carve it into small pieces and place them in the pie shell.
Lightly fry the bacon until light brown. Crumble the bacon over the chicken.

Make a sauce by heating the chicken stock. Beat the egg and mix with the juice. Pour this into the saucepan with the chicken stock and simmer until thickened stirring constantly. Remove from heat and dampen the meat with half or less of the sauce.

Cover the pie with the remaining pastry. Make a hole in the top and bake 1-1 ½ hrs.

Place the remaining sauce in a small container with a lid.

Put the pie in a lunchbox, preferably one with a shelf underneath for coals to keep the pie and the sauce warm.

Put the left over broth in the bottle on top of the pie in the lunchbox. The wine skin is carried separately.

Thursday, November 3, 2011

ARBERRY, JOHN ARTHUR, 1905-1969 WITH 13 C DOUGHNUTS (AQRAS MUKARRARA) RECIPE

Photo by: sologak1.blogspot.com

Arberry, John Arthur, 1905-1969. He graduated from Pembroke College, Cambridge and studied in Cairo 1932-1934. He became chair of the Persian Department at the University of London in 1944 and two years later became the head of Near East and Middle Eastern Department there before going to Cambridge the following year after being elected professor of Arabic. He continued there until his death. Throughout his life, he translated innumerous manuscripts from Arabic to English. His translation of A Baghdad Cookery Book (Kitāb al-tabīkh ) is of primary concern for the contrast of the culture in the Near East with European civilization during the Middle Ages. [Roden. “Forward.” 2001:17]

Medieval Doughnuts (Aqras Mukarrara) adapted for Fearless Kitchen, September 23, 2011, from A Baghdad Cookery Book (Kitāb al-tabīkh), p 87

Ingredients

1 3/4 cup lukewarm water
3 cups white all-purpose flour
1 1/3 cups white bread flour
2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons raw sugar
Medieval Doughnuts (Aqras Mukarrara)
Photo from: Fearless Kitchen
2 tablespoons olive oil


Equipment:
Frying pan
Saucepan
Food processor
Slotted spatula
Stand mixer with dough hook attachment
Bowls

Preparation

1. Combine the 2 teaspoons raw sugar with the water and the yeast in a bowl. Set aside until the yeast becomes markedly foamy.
2. Combine the flours, salt and olive oil in the bowl of your stand mixer.
3. Add the yeast mixture.  Knead on the lowest setting until the ingredients are combined, then increase speed slightly (from 1 to 3 of 11 on mine) and knead until a soft dough is formed. It should form a ball around the dough hook.
4. Cover the dough and set aside to rise for about an hour or until very puffy. The length of time this will take depends on the heat of your kitchen.
5. Meanwhile, make the rest of the components. Start with the syrup: combine 1 1/2 cups water with 1 1/2 cups sugar in the saucepan.
6. Heat over medium heat, stirring constantly until the sugar is completely dissolved.
7. Bring to a boil. Boil at least 1 minute.
8. Remove from heat. Wait about thirty seconds and add the rosewater.
9. To make the filling, combine 2 cups raw sugar and 1/3 pound almonds in your food processor. Process to a fine powder.
10. Add enough of the syrup to make it into a firm paste - you shouldn't need to add more than 1/2 cup but if you do that's okay.
11. Clean out your food processor and grind the remaining raw sugar into a fine powder.
12. When the dough is ready, pull off a small chunk of it, about as much as will fit between your thumb and forefinger if you touch the tips together.
13. Roll the piece of dough into a ball.
14. Break out a little bit of the almond paste from the food processor. Roll it into a ball and flatten it with your hands.
15. Pat the cake into a flat disc and set aside. Repeat with the remaining dough.
16. Heat the oil in your frying pan.  You want enough to fry the cakes without burning but not so much that you're deep-frying.
17. Add a few of the dough discs.  The number you add will depend on the size of your frying pan, but do NOT overcrowd your pan. Not only does that lead to poor results it tends to lead to house fires. So don't do it.
18. Fry the pieces on both sides for about a minute.
19. Dip each pastry into the syrup, then into the ground sugar, then return it to the pan.
20. Repeat this procedure twice more, setting the discs aside after the third sugaring. Finish with the remaining discs.
21. Serve immediately