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Thursday, January 5, 2012

AVICENA WITH 13TH C STUFFED KID GOAT ROASTED ON A SPIT RECIPE

avicena


OCast Aviçena, Auiçena, Eng. Avicenna, Ibn Sina, 980-1037, a Persian philosopher, physician and complier of Al-Qanun fi’l-Tibb (“The Canon of Medicine, ” L. Regimine Sanorum), an encyclopedia of Greek and Roman Medicine. It relates the achievements of Greek physicians, those of the Roman Imperial Age and Arabic works including his own. It had a great impact not only in the Islamic world but also due to Gerard of Cremona’s 12th C. translation, it was studied in European universities for several centuries, as his discoveries were major in the medical world for 500 years after his time. Avicenna was born near Bukara, a village in Turkistan. By 18, he was a physician and a philosopher in Bukara. With the collapse of the Samanid Empire in 999, he left for Persia where it seems that he spent most of the remainder of his life. He became the Vizier of Hamadan  (Iran) 1020 and lived with ‘Ala ad-Daula, the ruler of Isfahan during the last 14 years of his life. He died in Hamadan in 1037. He advised that kid should be roasted, while lamb should be boiled with parsley. See Nueva-Clásica Cocina Andalusí. [ES: “Abu’l ‘Ali al-Husayn.” Dec 24, 02; ES: Philips. Dec 11, 02; and Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:152-153]


ROASTING A ENTIRE KID GOAT ON A SPIT IN ITS SKIN[1] AND RECIPE FOR STUFFING ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ  #QUI PARLA CON S’EPERELLEN CABRITS EN AST A B LA PEL, p 69 and #IIII QUI PARLA COM SE FFERCEX CABRIT, pp 55-56[2] 

Ingredients for Blood Pudding Stuffing:

Inés, the Wise Lady, directing
the collection of blood for pudding
Photo by: Lord-Williams
4 tbsp virgin olive oil
2 chopped onions
3 garlic cloves mashed
4 lbs chunks of kid goat
½ lb chunks of lamb fat
4 tsp mixed seasoning (peppercorns, sweet marjoram, oregano and thyme)
2 ground bay leaves
½ c minced parsley
3 tbsp salt
1 qt kid goat blood
4 beaten eggs

Preparation of Stuffing:
Sauté onions and garlic in olive oil until caramelized about 15-20 min. Remove and let cool.
Grind the meat and the fat two times. Mix that in a pot with the onions and garlic. Mix seasoning, herbs and salt and coat the meat mixture.  Pour in blood, mixing well.  Simmer about 10 minutes while slowly adding the eggs to thicken the mixture. Remove from heat and set aside to cool.



blog.travelpod.com
Ingredients for roasting:
1 kid goat 25-30 lbs (allow 1 lb per person, if smaller all the better)
2 c olive oil
3 tbsp salt
2 tsp freshly ground pepper
1 garlic head slivered
12 beaten eggs

Preparation of roast:

Slaughter the goat by slitting its neck. Immediately put a pan under the neck to collect the blood. After a minute or two, have another pan placed under the neck and vigorously whip the blood in the first pan to prevent it from coagulating. After a minute or two change pans and continue the process collecting and beating until enough blood is collected. Scorch the hide with a blowtorch to remove the fur. Following Gázquez remove the hide of the animal. Slit the breast and stomach open and remove the entrails. Hang the goat whole for the remaining blood to drip out and to tenderize the meat. It should be left for a week in 100º weather, longer if colder weather. 

Cut off the head.and skin the animal. Rub the entire cavity with ¼ c olive oil. Sprinkle the 1 tbsp salt and pepper on it. With a paring knife make small incisions in the body and insert slices of garlic. Rub the outside with olive oil. Place the goat on the skewer and secure it on the spit. Fill the cavity with the stuffing. Sew the cavity closed with twine.
Roast the goat over a hard wood fire. Make quarter turns every 20 minutes and baste with olive oil for 3-3 ½ hours. Then  paint the body the egg for two hours or until done to make the skin golden brown.

Remove the kid goat from the fire setting it on a clean work surface. Let it rest 20 minutes. Remove the spit, wires and twine. Place the stuffing on a platter and carve the meat from the bones. 

[1] Gázquez, p. 157 points out that animals during the Middle Ages, were roasted in their hides. First these were scalded and then scorched to remove the fur. The procedure is the same as that for pigs. Today, it is not recommended to roast kid in its skin for the strong flavor. 

[2] For a variation of this recipe see “Cabra,” blog published July 4, 2012.

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