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Wednesday, February 22, 2012

BASTIMENTO, ABASTECIMIENTO WITH 13TH C VALENTINE'S SPECIAL MARZIPAN!

Legumes
Photo by: mrsamper

essential provisions in a house or a city, the action and effect of supplying. Nola advises that it is the overseer's duty to obtain quality provisions at the best prices available. In some cases, this required a great deal of planning ahead. Provisions such as sugar were purchased in Seville, for example, to supply noble households in northern provinces for one entire year. [Nola/Pérez. 1994:72:190]

MARZIPAN, A “FRUIT” MADE OF SUGAR
ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #485 LA FĀKIHA DE AZÚCAR, p 265


Ingredients

Super Tiny Marzipan Hearts
Photo from: SteelCityFlan
4 c granulated sugar
4 c ground almonds
1 1/3 c rosewater
food coloring
almond oil

Preparation

Sprinkle a workspace, such as a marble slab or wooden cutting board, with almond oil. Fill the sink with cold water.

Place sugar in 1 1/3 c rosewater in a large heavy saucepan. Heat stirring until sugar dissolves. Turn up heat and bring to a boil. Cover and let boil for 3 minutes. Uncover and let boil until it becomes a soft ball.

Place the bottom of the saucepan in the cold water in the sink, stirring the sugar mixture constantly until it becomes thick and creamy.

Add the ground almonds. Return to the stove over low heat. Stir for 2 minutes until mixture is thick.
Spoon marzipan onto the workspace, turning it with a metal spatula until it cools enough to be touched.

Coat hands almond oil and begin to knead the marzipan, working it until it is smooth. Color and shape it at will.

Serve immediately or wrap in in plastic wrap and store it in an airtight container.

2 comments:

  1. Well, it does not seem so difficult after all if you take care of the sugar. Marzipan is tradictionally eaten in Spain in Christmas, and it is rather hard to find in other seasons, unless you go to Toledo, the "capital" of marzipan. It is not usual nowadays to colour the marzipan: the "traditional" is in natural almond colour, with perhaps a hint of tan (I suppose they put it in the oven for a short time). In other countries, as Italy, Germany or Austria (and even Chile, where they have inherited the "European" tradition, they use different colours and give it very sophisticated shapes: miniature fruits or vegetables, for instance. I don't know which is nearer to the medieval, although they had a fancy for coloured things.

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    Replies
    1. Quite right, but I was sending a post Valentine recipe for you to make for your love!
      Sorry I was a little tardy. . . Please save it for next year.

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