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Thursday, March 22, 2012

BOCADOS WITH ANOTHER 13TH C RECIPE FOR THE JUDGE'S MORSELS

Tasty Morsels Bakery Lips
Photo by: kitencouture


Eng. tidbits, morsels. Los Bocados del Cadi or Bocaditos del Cadi (The Judge’s Morsels or little morsels) was one of the most famous sweets. It is a fritter made with a mixture of sugar and almond puree with other aromas mixed with flour. This is cut into bit sized pieces and shaped like nuts. They are fried in oil and served with sugar sprinkled on top and with or without pistachios, almonds or pinenuts. They can be coated with flour before frying. Ibn Battuta[1] makes particular mention of foods connected with the medieval attitude toward hospitality including luqumât al-qâdi, (“the Cadi’s Morsels.”) in Volume III, p. 757 of the translation of his work by H.A.R. Gibb and p. 139 of the translation by Mahdi Husain. The latter gives the Arabic name, the former only the English. The recipes are included in the Anón Andalus and Fadalat. [Anón/Huici. 1965:268:156; ES: Anon/Perry. Sep 5 02:82:ftn 97; and Ibn Razin/Granja. 1960:48:21]

THE JUDGE’S MORSELS ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN ANDALUS, #268 TITLE MISSING. . . p 156

Fritters
Photo by Tiffany Burns
Ingredients[2]

5 c semolina flour
2 c oil
2 eggs
1 tsp yeast
1 c chopped almonds, pinenuts or pistachios
oil for deep frying


Garnish:
Powdered Sugar

Preparation

Saturate the semolina flour with water to make a dough like that for donuts. Knead it add oil little by little. Beat until it is smooth. Add eggs and yeast and beat until light. Roll it into a ball and cover with a cloth and let it rise (1-2 hours) and become thick. Knead it again adding the chopped nuts. Divide the dough into small pieces. Deep fry, sprinkle with powdered sugar  and serve.
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[1] See blog titled Battuta published February 23, 2012.
[2]  It is interesting to note that differences between this recipe and the one in Fadalat. See Battuta.





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