Entradas populares

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

BOTELLA WITH 13TH C FISH PIE RECIPE

Old wine bottles Tuscany
Photo by: Sondre.engelsen 

OCast botilla, Eng. bottle. Between the 13-15 C. it meant a glass or crystal vessel, with a long neck and wide round bottom, which prevented the wine from becoming bitter. The first Spanish glass factory was founded during the first quarter of the 9th C in Cordoba. (Botilla later came to mean a women’s ankle boot or half boot from which, on occasion, a daring admirer might drink wine to honor the lady.) [Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:34-35:ftn 68]

Spanish wine is drunk to enhance the taste of food. It is never drunk without food. The following fish pie calls for a bottle of wine next to it. This pie can be eaten as Hors d'ourves or a main course for dinner.


SALT OR FRESH WATER FISH PIE ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN ANDALUS, #144. EMPANADA DE PESCADO DE MAR O DE RÍO, p 97-98
For 4 persons


Ingredients

For the dough:
2 ½ c flour
1 c or 8 oz very cold butter
1 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
½ c ice water

Pie Fish
(a creative variation)
Photo by: yustoprst 
For the filling:
2 lbs firm white fish
1 c cilantro juice
6 peppercorns ground
1 tsp Byzantine murri
1 tsp olive oil
4 eggs beaten

Preparation

Dough:
Mix flour, salt and sugar in a food processor. Chop butter and add. Mix until the butter looks like big crumbs. Add ice water, a drizzle at a time until the dough holds together.

Remove dough from the food processor and place it in a ball on a clean surface. Press the down with the palm of the hand 3 or 4 times to help flatten the butter. This will make the crust flaky. Knead the dough well, but leave little bits of butter as they are the secret to flaky dough.  Shape it into two balls. Sprinkle with flour and cover with a cloth. Let it sit in a cool place or refrigerate for at least 1 hour but no more than 2 days.

When ready to use, remove the dough from the refrigerator. Let sit 5-10 minutes to warm up to room temperature. Roll a ball out with a rolling pin on a lightly floured smooth surface. Make a 12” circle, 1/8” thick.  If too sticky sprinkle a little flour over it. Put the dough in a 9” pie tin that has been greased and sprinkled with flour. Press it down on the bottom and sides. Trim the edges.

Roll out the second ball of dough into a 12” circle, 1/8” thick.

PREHEAT OVEN TO 350ºF/180ºC

Filling:
Clean the fish inside and out and remove the bones, the head, tail, fins and scrape off the scales. Remove the skin and cut until pieces. Place these in the pie tin.

Beat the eggs in a bowl. Mix the juices and pepper. Discard the pits from the plums and chop them. Add them to mixture with murri, oil and eggs. Mix well and pour this over the dish. Cover the dish with dough. Seal the edges with a fork. Prick holes in the top for the steam to escape. Bake 40 minutes or until the crust is browned and the filling is bubbling.

[1] The manuscript states that the dough should be the same as that for almojábana (cheese pie), which is flatbread made with oil not butter. 
[2] This is debatable for it is listed as a spice. Perry shows the original text is: myrobalan [? hîlaj for ihlîlaj? ]. He does not think plums appropriate for this recipe. In ftn 60 he deduces one might read "hâl" for "hîlaj," which would be "cardamom."
[3] See: almorí with Byzantine murri blog published August 25, 2011 for recipe.

No comments:

Post a Comment