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Friday, May 18, 2012

BUÑUELOS DE GERINGA, WITH 13TH C FRITTER RECIPE

Schwetzinger Barockgarten - Pan und Syrinx
Photo by: Jorbasa
(syrinx or reed, named for the Arcadian nymph who fleeing from Pan requested to be metamorphosed into a reed from which Pan then made his flute), buñuelos de viento, of “wind,”  Eng fritters with no filling.” In Spain they are made more than anywhere else during winter months. Even today they are specially made on All Saint's Day, November 1st. In medieval times, they were frequently served during light meals. C. Martinez Montiño states the dough is the same as that used for almojábanas. See blog published August 24, 2011. Although these fritters were not supposed to be filled, sometimes they are filled with cheese like the almojábanas. [Anón/Huici. 1966:6:18; Castro. Alimentación. 1996:248; Benavides-Barajas. Nueva-Clássica. 1995:271; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:267]

SIMPLE ISFÎRIYÂ ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION 

OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #6, LA "ISFÎRIY” SENCILLA, p 18


Ingredients

Buñuelos de Los Santos
(All Saint's Day Fritters)
Photo by: Aldeana
2 c milk
1 c water
¼ c butter
1 tbsp zest of lemon sliced
1 pinch of salt
2 tsp of mixed spices (pepper, coriander, cumin and cinnamon), well ground
¼ tsp saffron
2 c flour
1 pk yeast
5 eggs beaten
olive oil for frying

Garnish:
Powdered sugar

Preparation

Dissolve the saffron in a little of the milk. Put that, and the rest of the milk in a saucepan with water, butter, zest of lemon, salt and the remaining spices. Heat and remove just before about to boil add all the flour and yeast. Lower the heat to simmer and stir.

When well mixed, increase the heat until the mixture separates from the sides of the saucepan. Remove from heat and let the dough cool. Add eggs little by little, stirring constantly. When well mixed, shape the dough into balls the size of walnuts or shape like reeds and fry them in a frying pan with enough olive oil to cover them.

When golden brown put them on a plate with paper towels underneath to absorb excess oil.  Sprinkle with powdered and serve.

1 comment:

  1. In fact, there are still many dishes (specially sweets)associated to religious festivities, and it is almost impossible to find them in other times of the year. This is the case with buñuelos de viento (filled also with whipped cream, chocolate or other "modern" fillings), "huesos de santo" (saints bones), also for All Saints (1st. November), "roscón de reyes" (6th. January), "torrijas" (Holy Week), and many local specialities, as "rosquillas tontas y listas" in Madrid, for the holy patron St. Isidro (15th. May).

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