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Wednesday, May 16, 2012

BUÑUELOS WITH 14TH C RECIPE FOR BUNYOLS (CHEESE FRITTERS)

Bimuelos, frying
(for Hannukah)
Photo by: goldberg
OCat bunyols, Nav boynuelos, Ar. isfanŷ, Hebr. bimuelos, binuelos (matzo balls), Eng. bunyols, puff fritters today but leaf fritters in the Middle Ages (see hojaldre) consisting of salty or sweet food wrapped in leaf-pastry and fried in olive oil or cream puffs. It is one of the desserts heartily adopted from the Arabs in medieval Iberia although thought to be of Roman origin. They were incorporated into Christian cuisine after they reconquered Spanish land from the Hispano-Arabs. Fritters became part of the fried foods or fried sweets in Castile where fat or lard could be used instead of olive oil. With cheesecake, they were most popular in Al-Andalus. Buñuelos always were made with basic ingredients that increased tastes for light, “fine” sweets that appealed to the taste, smell and sight. Today traditional Hanukah puffy fritters are made in Sephardic communities around the Mediterranean. Generally, they are called bimuelos. As Hanukah was a minor holiday for medieval Jews in Iberia, leaf fritters were associated with other holidays such as Passover and Yom Kippur and family celebrations. Like omelets, they could be filled with anything. One surviving recipe calls for meat, another eggplant, still another chickpeas and finally one requiring flat bread with almonds, walnuts or apples. Due to the vast variety of fritters, the Arabs began to apply different names to distinguish them as will be seen in later blogs. [Aguilera. 2002:83; Anón/Grewe. 1982:CLX:174-175; Benavides–Barajas Alhambra. 1999:151; Castro. Alimentación. 1996:248; ES: Castro.” The Role” Aug 3, 03; ES: Salónica. 04; Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:151; and Serrano. 2008:337]

BUNYOLS ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVI #CLX QUI PARLA CON SE FFAN BUNYOLS DE FFORMATGE E D’OUS, pp 174-175
For 50 balls

Ingredients

Bunyols de quaresma
(for Lent)
Photo by: PaRaP 
7 ½  c flour, sifted twice
1 tbsp yeast
1 ½  tbsp salt
1 ½  tbsp sugar
1 lb grated parmesan cheese
5 eggs
1 pt warm milk
1 c extra virgin olive oil
extra virgin olive oil for frying
sugar for sprinkling

Preparation

Mix flour, yeast and salt. Beat 1 tbsp sugar with eggs and oil. Add milk and cheese and mix well. Add this mixture to the flour. Knead well. More milk may be added if needed but the dough should be thick. Make a couple of large balls with this, cover with a rag and let sit in a cool spot for two hours while the dough rises. Knead the dough again and make balls ½” in diameter.

Heat enough oil in a frying pan to cover the bunyols. When golden brown drain them on paper towels. Sprinkle them with sugar and serve warm or at room temperature.

1 comment:

  1. The medieval versions I've seen of quince paste usually call for 1 to 1 fruit to sugar, but the 13th c. Andalusian said 3 to 1 honey to fruit, which I find to be too much honey and not enough fruit. (Might need more sweet with their bitter carrots, though.)

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