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Thursday, June 14, 2012

CACIOCAVALLO WITH 15TH C THICK CHEESE AND MEATBALL SOPES

Caciocavallo Silano DOP
Photo from:
 La Compagnia del Cavatappi
(fr. It cacio, cheese, It cavallo, horse, caciota (probably an abbreviated form of the word), cheese from sheep or cow’s milk. It is flask-shaped or pear-shaped cheese which is hung in twos like saddle bags. It was mentioned by Hippocrates in about 500 BC. It is prevalant in what was Magna Graecia, the area of southern Italy occupied by the Greeks. It is a bland cheese with poor texture used to flavor dishes. It is too salty to eat alone with nothing else. See brufalino. [ES: Adreozzi. May 27, 2012; ES: Elliot. May 18, 12; ES: M.R. Samper. May 17 and 19, 2012; and Nola.1989:xlv-1]


THICK CHEESE AND MEATBALL SOPES A VARIATION OF NOLA'S xlv-1 QUESO ASADERO
For 4 persons

Ingredients


½ lb ground beef
polpette caciocavallo_02
Photo from:
 Clemmy xxx
2 oz shredded Parmesan cheese
1 egg
salt and pepper to taste
½ c white flour
½  c virgin olive oil
3 oz giblits
1 qt chicken broth
4 oz caciocavallo cheese diced
1 c croutons


Preparation


Put ground beef into a mixing bowl with 1 tbsp Parmesan cheese, egg, salt and pepper to taste. Mix these ingredients together and roll them into meatballs. Dip them in flour and fry them in a ¼ c olive oil. Cut giblets into small pieces and sauté in ¼ c olive oil. Heat up the broth in a saucepan and when it comes to a boil, add the meatballs and the giblets and simmer. Pour into soup bowls and garnish with  caciocavallo cheese and croutons. Sprinkle Parmesan on top. 

4 comments:

  1. But this is sooooo Italian I can hardly believe it!!! even if it is surelynot usual nowadays in Italy: perhaps because italians are always dieting to fit into their Armanis???
    In any case, cheese as an important ingredient has lost ground in Spain since the Middle Ages, and that's a pity for cheese-lovers like me. Cheese in Spain goes mainly as an appetizer or dessert and little else more. Dishes with "hot cheese" like this are no usual anymore. I think perhaps it is due to the replacement of simple, "poor" proteins (like cheese) for "rich" ones (meat, fresh fish)in modern times. Is it possible?

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    1. It is interesting to note that of the medieval manuscripts with recipes, Nola is the first to call for shredded cheese. Perhaps that comes from Italian influence. - By the way, this is a yummy dish!

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  2. Surely Nola took it from Italy, since "Magna Grecia" was the kingdom of Naples-two Sicilies.
    Yummy indeed!!! it could be like a cheese fondue and a meat fondue put together!!!! Then let accidentally fall some pieces of bread into the sauce and you've got it...
    To try when weather gets cold. By the way, which wine should you advice? red or white?

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    Replies
    1. Red without a doubt! Depending on the winery and how strong the cheese I would choose a Merlot or a Cabernet Sauvignon - perhaps the latter in order to let the cheese flavor dominate and the wine to enhance the taste.

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