Entradas populares

Monday, June 18, 2012

CADI (Hisp Ar) WITH THE JUDGE'S MORSELS RECIPE FROM JAÉN

H401/0212
(Averroes (1126-1198), Islamic Spanish physician, philosopher,
and judge in Spain and Morocco. See blog dated Dec 30, 11.)
Photo from: sirajmonir
Ar. qâdi, Eng. qadi, cadi, kadi, judge, arbitrating judge knowledgeable in the Qurān and the sunnah or a civil judge usually in a town or village. He must have had a reputation of liking sweets for the dish named for him, “los bocaditos del cadi” (The Judge’s Morsels). See Battuta and bocados.[1] [Anón/Huici. 1966:268:156; Ency Brit. 1988:9:Otter:830:1a; ES: Anon/Perry. Sep 5, 02:ftn 97; Ibn Razin/Granja.1960:21; and OXF Eng Dict. 1989: II:BBC]



THE JUDGE'S MORSELS RECIPE FROM JAÉN[2]

Ingredients

Chopped almonds in a measuring cup
Photo from:
 epicurenextdoor
2 c sugar
1 c orange blossom water
1 tbsp almond oil
2 c peeled ground and toasted almonds
1 tsp cinnamon
½ tsp ground nutmeg
½ tsp ground cloves
dough for turnovers
extra virgin olive oil for deep frying

Garnish:
powdered sugar
ground cinnamon

Preparation

Turnovers, Eaten with Powdered...
Photo from:
 baroquebobcat
Heat the sugar, orange blossom water and almond oil in a saucepan, stirring constantly until the sugar dissolves. Add the almonds and spices. Continue stirring until the mass thickens. Turn this out on a clean surface and let cool.

Arrange pieces of pastry for the turnovers on a lightly floured surface and put a heaping spoonful of the almond stuffing on each. Fold the dough over and seal shut with the prongs of a fork. Prick the turnovers with a fork to let the air out.


Deep fry in olive oil until golden brown. Sprinkle powdered sugar and cinnamon over each turnover before serving.



[1] See blogs with these titles published February 23, 2012 and March 22, 2012 respectively.
[2] Today in Jaen, this recipe, compliments of the Morales family, is as popular as almojábanos (cheese filled donuts, recipe published in blog dated August 24, 2011). It is quite plausible that the recipe above is the same as that used in Miguel Lucas Iranzo, Constable of Castile’s household in Jaen during the 15th C. For variations of this recipe from Fadalat and the 13th C Anon Al-Andalus see the Battuta and bocados blogs.

No comments:

Post a Comment