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Wednesday, June 27, 2012

CALDERA, -O WITH 15TH C RECIPE FOR FRENCH MUSTARD

CALDEROS DE LEON
Photo from;
 LULIBELULA
calderón, OCast ganza, Eng. caldron, cauldron. A calderón is bigger than a caldera or caldero. They varied in size from 5-30 qts. Sánchez Albornoz describes them as an item Domingo, the blacksmith, might exchange for a load of turnips or wheat from the bishop's servant. Gázquez refers to them as a pots for cooking food. He claims that as Sent Soví and Nola direct the cook to serve certain dishes in individual bowls, this indicates that food was served either in individual bowls if not directed to do so then the cauldron was set on the table for eaters to serve themselves from it. The Archpriest of Hita first talks of pure copper cauldrons and later lists them among pots and pans found in kitchens. They could be made of tin, iron or steel as well. [Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:33:41:42:123; Nola/Perez. 1984:145; Ruíz/Brey. 1965:176:1087c:185:1175a; and Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:47:ftn 64:125:ftn 70:135 etc]

ANOTHER VERY GOOD FRENCH MUSTARD THAT KEEPS ALL YEAR ADAPTED FROM PEREZ’ TRANSLATION OF NOLA BUT NOT INCLUDED IN REPRODUCTION OF THE 1525 EDITION: OTRA MOSTAZA FRANCESA MUY BUENA Y DURA TODO EL AÑO, p 145

Brad Pitt inspecting yellow mustard seeds in wine vinegar
Photo by: Lord-Willams
Ingredients

1 ½ c wine vinegar more or less[1]
¾ c yellow or brown mustard seed
1 clothes pin
1 ½ tsp ground and mixed spices (3/4 tsp cinnamon, ½ tsp cloves, ¼ tsp ginger)
salt to taste


Preparation


Put mustard seed in a cup. Pour about 1 c vinegar over the mustard seed until it is one inch above the seed. Let soak overnight for the seeds to absorb the vinegar and to become soft enough to be able to crush them by hand.


The next morning place a clothes pin over one’s nose. Grind the seeds in a blender adding about ½ c vinegar little by little until the desired thickness of obtained. Add spices and salt to taste. Place this in a sterilized glass jar. Shut tightly and let marinate for at least 8 days. It will last indefinitely.
The smell is so strong the first day is enough to wake the dead. It mellows day by day.

French Mustard made with Yellow Seeds and Wine Vinegar
Photo by: Lord-Williams
The original recipe translated by Lord-Williams:

Take a cauldron that will hold 2 canters[2] of red grapes. Cook it until the liquid is reduced to one half. Remove scum with a wooden stick and stir from time to time with a stick; and strain this must through a clean cloth and put it in a canter; then add one soup bowl full of ground mustard seed, stir it little by little with the stick and each day stir it 4 or 5 times a day and if desired add 3 parts cinnamon, 2 parts cloves and 1 part ginger; this French mustard is very good and keeps all year and is mulberry colored.


[1] Must, grape juice or red or white wine may be used instead.
[2] See cantaro, a large wine jug measuring 2.5-4 gals depending on the region in the Middle Ages.

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