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Thursday, August 2, 2012

CAÑAREJO APIO CABALLAR WITH 14TH C VINAGRETTE TO ACCOMPANY MEATS

life cycle
Photo from:
 penwren
apio equino, apio macedónico, perejil macedónico, esmirnio, olosatro,  OCast alixandria, Port and Gall salsa de cavalo, cegudes, apio dos cavalos, roses de pé de piolho, Cat api cavallar, abil de siquia, julivert de moro, cugul, aleixandri, Hisp Ar karats barri, Gr hipposelinon, L Smyrnium olusatrum, Eng alexanders, alisander, maceron. The Greek word means parsley or horse celery. The Hispano Arabic name was applied to differentiate it from other celeries in medieval Spain but the English ate it as celery. Alexanders are thought to be of Macedonian or oriental origin. Since the 4 C BC, they have been known as a medicinal plant. Dioscorides wrote that the seeds, with wine, were taken for the oil stimulated the flow of menstrual blood and that the leaves and roots could be eaten. Cuminal, an essential oil that is something like cumin, is contained in the fruit. Galen thought it not as active as celery. For dog bites and calculus, Pliny recommended a decoction containing the root and wine.

ALEKSANDERURT Smyrnium...
Photo from:
 Svein Erik Larsen
In medieval times, the root especially, was consumed for its aperient, depurative and diuretic attributes. Maimonides wrote about alexanders. It has been found that its richest property is vitamin C. It does have stomachic and carminative elements. Smyrnium, the generic name, refers to the flavor of the leaves especially and the rest of the plant, which tastes and smells like myrrh. The Romans called it “myrrh of Achaea” (the ancient name for Greece) for its believed origin. In cookery, it was used like parsley to flavor sauces, stews and soups. It was served also as a fresh vegetable, like celery. Apicius gives a recipe for it to be eaten raw dipped in wine, oil and liquamen or grilled with fish. The roots could be pickled. Until the 19th century, when it was forgotten, it was one of the most common garden vegetables throughout Europe, England and North Africa by the Romans. [Apicius/Flower. 1958:III:XII:83:ftn 3; and ES: FAO Ch 30. Feb 2, 98] 

ALEXANDER VINAGRETTE TO ACCOMPANY SPIT ROASTED MUTTON OR GOAT ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ #CLXVI QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FFER JURVERT, p 179-180

Alexander Vinagrette
Deliciously Sweet and Sour!
Photo by: Lord-Willliams
Ingredients

1 sprig young sage leaves
5 sprigs mint
6 springs marjoram
12 or more stalks and alexander[1] leaves
1 slice of crustless bread
2 tbsp wine vinegar
1 tsp pepper
1 garlic clove peeled
4 walnut halves
¼ c hazel nuts
5 tbsp olive oil
½ c honey
salt to taste

Preparation

Strip the leaves off the stalks[2] and discard the stalks. Soak bread in 2 tbsp vinegar. Using a food processor, blend herbs, bread, garlic and nuts into a smooth paste, gradually add olive oil. Add the honey.[3] If the sauce is too thick add a little more vinegar and salt to taste. Serve at room temperature or heat in the microwave for 30 seconds.


[1] If alexander is not available, use parsley.
[2] If using a thermomix stems may be included.
[3] If honey is too thick to handle easily, microwave for 30 seconds.

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