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Friday, August 10, 2012

CAPÓN WITH BOILED AND ROASTED CAPON

Mr Rooster in texture
Photo from: Nancy Violeta Velez

pollo capón, OCat capons, Cat capó, MEng capoun, chapoun, caponys, Eng capon, castrated male chicken. A young capon still is a popular dish in León served pilgrims on the Way of St. James. Villena instructs that it should be carved in the same manner as a peacock except that the sternum and pelvis should not be cut into two parts. The English baked or roasted them and liked to ‘gild’  them by basting them with egg yolks mixed with flour. They were served in a cōncỹ (MEng) sauce with hardboiled egg yolks that looked like quinces also called in cassoslont, in councy. [Anón/Grewe. 1982:I:64:II:65:Apè III:239; Curye. 1985:63:176; Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:151; and Villena/Calero. 2004:22b:26a]

MEAT THAT SHOULD BE BOILED IN WATER AND ROASTED ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ #II QUI PARLA CON NI EN QUINA CARN SE DEU METRE EN AYGUA CALDA, E QUE V ESTIFUEN ANS QUE’S COGUEN,[1] p 64-65



Boiling Capon
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

1 whole capon, 3-4 lbs
salt
1 tsp thyme
1 tsp pepper
1 tsp basil
1 tsp rosemary
1 tsp cumin
salt to taste
1 garlic clove mashed
1 tbsp lard

For the gravy:
1 c broth from boiling the capon
and pan drippings under the spit or in roasting pan
¼ c flour
1 tsp thyme
salt to taste

Garnish:
pomegrante arils
sprigs of thyme

Boiled and Roasted Capon
for a Tender Touch
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Cut off the neck and claws. Remove the entails. Wash the chicken and scorch. Rub with salt. 

Fill a pot with water, add seasoning and bring to a boil. Add a capon and gently boil for about 20 minutes.

PREHEAT OVEN 375º F/190º C IF NOT USING A SPIT.

Remove the chicken from the water, pat dry and grease it inside and out with lard. Put is on a spit or roast in oven. Baste with drippings while cooking. Roast between 25-30 minutes until done.

Make gravy by bringing 1 c broth to a boil. Add pan drippings, flour, thyme and salt to taste.

[1] Grewe relates that although this system of boiling and then roasting has fallen into disuse, it was widespread throughout the Middle Ages. It was common fare for the Medicis in Florence for instance. In Huici’s Anón Al-Andalus translation of Recipe #20 Receta del Asado de Gallina (Recipe for Roasting a Hen), p 25 is practically the same recipe as Sent Sovi´s.  Actually, Sent Sovi’s recipe is for almost any type of fowl including peacock, cranes, geese and hens. It specifically excludes stuffed fowl.

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