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Wednesday, September 19, 2012

CEBADA WITH 14TH C RECIPE FOR HORDIATE, A BARKEY DRINK

Barley
Photo from:
 Frog n fries
OCast ceuada, cevada, ordio, Arag hordio, OCat hordi, Cat ordi, L. hordeum, Ar. shaīr, Eng. barley. This is a bread grain producing dark flour. It was used to make bread in areas where wheat was scarce and to make couscous grains and porridge. It does not produce porous bread because it contains little gluten. It was used to make unleavened or flatbread. It was considered a poor man’s bread but Avenzoar claimed it to be the best after wheat as he thought it cold but not as nutritious. He recommended baking it under ashes instead of in a tannur oven. It could be boiled in water and served as porridge. Mixed with water and honey it served as a refreshing drink. Since 5000 B.C., barley has been cultivated in Egypt and it is known to have been in Europe by 3000 B.C. There are two species: vulgare or irregulare (common barley) and distichum (pearl barley). Flowers growing on spikes become barley kernels, which are covered by bran and a husk. It is an adaptable plant that grows well in hot arid lands as well as cool wetlands. See hordiate and horchata. [Anón/Grewe. 1982:LXXXXVII:129:ftn 2:LXXXXVIII:129: Apè III:239; Bercero/Janer. 1983:307; Ency Brit. 1998:1:A:900:3b-901:1a; Nola.1989:xxxiii-2:xxxv-3:xl-5; Nola/Iranzo. 1982:170; and Nola/Pérez. 1994:199]

ANOTHER HORDIATE, ALMOND MILK ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ #LXXXXVIII QUI PARLA CON SE FFA DÁLTRA MANERA DÓRDIAT A LET DE AMELLES, pp 129-130
For 2 qts

Gently Boiling Barley Water
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients
1 c shelled almonds
8 c broth
1 c pearl barley
1 pinch salt
2 tbsp sugar


Garnish:
lemon and lemon zest[1]

Preparation           
Boil water in a saucepan. Add almonds when
boiling and remove from heat. Let stand for
2-3 minutes and peel them. Grind almonds.
Add 2 cbroth and continue grinding.
Strain the mixture through a cheesecloth into a
large saucepan. Add 6 c broth and barley. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to simmer and boil
gently 15-20 minutes until grains burst. Add salt to taste.
Barley Water with a Lemon Twist 
 Photo by: Lord-Williams
Pour the mixture into a food processor and
grind 1-2 minutes. Pour this through a sieve
into a bowl. Add sugar and lemon juice if
desired[2]. When cool bottle and store in the
refrigerator. _______________________
[1] Sent Soví does not call for lemon.
The juice and zest give the drink a nice twist. [2] Save the barley in the sieve and make
porridge by heating with milk and adding
brown sugar or honey.

3 comments:

  1. This is a classic of Spanish summer, only I'm not too sure about the bouillon. There should be two different drinks:
    1) horchata (the root coming clearly from hordeum), with white, milky consistency. It is still found today, in the last years even in supermarkets. But it is made not of barley but of "chufa", (Cyperus esculentus), which is really a root and not a seed, as the round shape could make believe.
    2) agua de cebada (barley water): this I have only heard of from my grandma and in zarzuela and literature. It was sold in kiosks during the summer and I have not idea how it looked (something like clear tea it seems).

    From one corner of Europe to another: you suggest using the remanent barley for a porridge. I suggest using it also for a soup. Paearl barley soups are completely unknow in Spain nowadays (I don't know if they were in the Middle Ages), but they are rather common in center and Eastern Europe and Russia, where they mix it with vegetables, mushrooms, bacon, ecc.

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  2. According to Wikipedia, bouillon cubes were not commercialized until 1908 by Maggi and 1910 by Oxo. This ingredient, therefore, has been eliminated from this recipe and all other recipes in this blog.
    "Horchata" with a recipe for making it will be published in this blog in due time. "Avenate," an oat caudle or gruel was published on 28 Dec 11 with Nola's 15th C recipe for it.
    Using the word "soup" for medieval porridges, soppes and gruels is not quite right as the latter were quite thick. These items were common in Asturias and other areas in northern Spain especially while the drinks were common among those working in the fields in Extremadura, Madrid and Andalusia.

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  3. Also at this site is a blog "almendrada" published on 12 Aug 11 with a recipe for this adapted from Pérez' addition to Nola recipes. "Almendrada" is also called "Horchata de Amendras," which in English is an almond drink.

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