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Wednesday, February 29, 2012

BELLOTA WITH 13TH C GLUTEN FREE ACORN BREAD RECIPE

800 Kilos of Acorn Ham
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ar. săh bellūt, balluta, Eng. acorn. In Spain, the most common come from the cork oak (Quercus ilex), which produces sweeter acorns than the English oak trees (Quercus robur). The acorn has been a primary food for humans during times of famine for over 2,000 years. During and after the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) eating acorns was common fare in regions where food was scarce. They were eaten plain or ground into flour and made into bread. Before the 8th C BC, Spaniards were making cakes with acorn flour and cooking them over the fire. They have been baked and used as a coffee substitute. During fruit famines they have been eaten as fruit. Villena lists them as such. They are the main diet of the Iberian pig. As there are sweet and bitter acorns, pigs peel them first. Then from the smell, they can distinguish the sweet from the bitter. They eat the sweet acorns and leave the bitter ones. Acorn oil was thought to have a heavy essence that hardens the members lessening sensitiveness. See alcornoque, breva, cerdo ibérico, encina, pan de bellotas and pata negra. [Bodelón. 1994:67; Benavides-Barajas. Nueva-Clássica. 1995:50; Castro. Almentación. 1996:205-206; ES: Gutiérrez. Jun 1, 98; ES: Salloum. Jun 28, 05; Villena/Calero. 2002:23ª]


ACORN BREAD A VARIATION OF FADALAT'S 
#1 PAN COCIDO EN EL HORNO p 18
(see aludir published on September 15, 2011 for another variation)

yummy delicious acorn bread

Photo by: lilfishstudios

Ingredients

2 c acorn flour
2 c semolina flour
1 tsp salt
3 tbsp fat or oil
3 tsp yeast
1/3 c honey or sugar
½ c hot milk or water
1 egg beaten

PREPARATION

PREHEAT OVEN TO 400º F / 200º C

Combine the flours with salt and yeast. Add water or milk and the egg. Knead well. Divide the dough into desired shapes for loaves. Sprinkle flour over them. Place the loaves in a piece of linen or woolen cloth. Cover this with lamb skin or something similar and let the masses rise. When they have risen sufficiently, they will emit a noise when struck. Bake them immediately in the oven for about 30 minutes. Once baked put them in a breadbasket for consumption.

Acorn bread is highly nutritious for its combination of protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Too, they are unique for the sweet nutty taste. Further, both acorn and semolina flours are gluten free.

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

BEBIDO WITH 15TH C BROTH RECIPE TO RAISE THE DEAD!

"Drunk Enough to Say I Love You" Poster

OCast beuido, Eng drunk, as in he has drunk his broth or one is tipsy from drinking too much alcohol. [Nola/Iranzo. 1982:168]




DISTILLED[1] BROTH FOR THE SICK ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S TORTA[2] DESTILADA PARA DOLIENTES xxxiiii-2

Ingredients

1 c bugloss
1 c borage
1 c endives
1 chicken about 3 lbs
2 tbsp cloves
2 tbsp cinnamon
2 tbsp white saunders
2 tbsp muscatel grapes

Drinking the #2 broth
Photo from
 the willis project 

Preparation

Boil endives, bugloss and borage in water and save 3 cups of the water done. 

Chop the chicken with the bones. Put it in a pressure cooker with the cloves, cinnamon, saunders and grapes. Cover it with the water used to boil the greans. 

Bring to 15 pounds pressure and cook 15 minutes. Turn off heat and allow pressure to reduce to normal. Strain the broth.

This it such a miraculous drink that it will raise the dead. Normally, this “torta” is given only to those who are too sick to drink. 


[1] Nola calls for a glaze earthenware or glass alembic to distill the liquid. This author used a pressure cooker as there was no alembic available. 
[2] This must be a scribal error as “torta” means cake


Monday, February 27, 2012

BEBER WITH 13TH C MINT SYRUP RECIPE

Even Wasp's Drink Water To Survive!!
Photo by Mohamed Malik 

OCast. beuer, Eng, to drink. [Nola/Iranzo. 1982:168]

HOW TO MAKE MINT SYRUP ADAPTED FROM HUICI'S
TRANSLATION OF ANÓN/AL-ANDALUS  #499 JARABE DE MENTA p 273
For 2 cups

sacrilege
Photo by mathiaslphotos
Ingredients

1 c mint leaves
1 c *basil leaves
1 c citron leaves
1 c cloves
2 c sugar

Preparation

Coarsely chop the leaves and place them in a cheesecloth bag with 1 c of whole cloves. Put them in a saucepan and cover 2 ¼ cups of water. Bring this to a gentle boil over medium-high heat. Then reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes.

Add the sugar and boil gently for about 5 minutes until the sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and let cool. Remove the cheesecloth bag and drink it. 

This syrup frees bodies of excess mucus in the respiratory system and relieves urinary infections. It fortifies the liver and the stomach and improves one’s disposition. It is an admirable drink.

*The original recipe calls for “babaq.” Huici states that this word is unknown. Perry translates it as basil.

Friday, February 24, 2012

BAYSĀR (Ar) - 13th C BAYSSAR, PURÉED FAVA BEANS (WITH LAMB)

Fava beans
(Shelled)
white puree of fava beans or a green puree of peas known on the Mediterranean coast as well as in Al-Andalus. [Ibn Razīn/Granja. 1960:25-26]

BAYSSAR, PURÉED FAVA BEANS (WITH LAMB) ADAPTED FROM FADALAT #140 OTRO PLATO, QUE SE GUISA CON HABAS SECAS TRITURADAS, LLAMADO BAYSĀR p 25
For 4 persons

Ingredients
1 lb meat with fat from a yearling lamb
tripe from the lamb
4 tsp salt
3 tbsp olive oil
3 tsp pepper
Rosy Chunks of Lamb with Fava Bean Puree
(Sad cause paprika not medieval!))
Photo from: Beauty & Sadness 
½ tsp coriander seed
1 tsp cumin
1 onion quartered
1 whole onion
3 c shelled fava beans
1 sliced garlic clove
½ tsp fennel
1 tbsp flour

Preparation

Cut the meat, fat and tripe from a yearling lamb into chunks. Put the pieces in a pot with 1 tsp salt, 1 tbsp oil, chopped onion and brown, stirring occasionally until the moisture from the meat evaporates and it is sealed. Then add hot water for the broth, pepper, coriander seed, ½ tsp cumin, and gently boil until meat is tender about 1 ½ hrs. Make a gravy with 1 c of broth and flour.

Wash fava beans with hot water. Put ¾ c water in a pan and bring it to a boil. Add the fava beans and boil until the bean inside the outer skin is bright green and firm but not hard, about 1 to 2 minutes. Drain the favas and immediately place in the ice water bath until cool. Peel the light green skin from each bean to reveal two bright green inner halves, discard the skins, and place the beans in a medium bowl.

Heat 4 tbsp of the olive oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add the garlic, the quartered onion, season with salt, ½ tsp cumin and fennel. Cook, stirring occasionally, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the fava beans and stir to coat with oil. Add ¾ c water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove the lid and continue to simmer, stirring occasionally, until the beans are tender, about 10 minutes more. (Add more water as needed, a tablespoon at a time, to keep the beans from sticking to the pan.)

When the habas are cooked and put them with the other ingredients cooked with them into a food processor adding broth from the lamb if needed and purée. Season with salt and set aside but keep warm. Serve on a platter with the lamb and gravy.

Thursday, February 23, 2012

BATTUTA, IBN WITH 13TH C MORSELS FOR THE JUDGE RECIPE

Ibn Battuta meets Indian Sultan
Photo by: TR Ramesh
1304-1368. He was born in Tangier. At the age of 20, Ibn Battuta decided to go on a pilgrimage to Mecca. For the next 29 years, more or less, he traveled some 75,000 miles through what today are some 44 countries, mostly dominated by Muslims between Tangiers and the Far East. This included Niger, Timbuktu, Turkey, central Asia, India, China and Mali. His motto was to never retrace his footsteps or cover the same route twice. He returned home in 1346 where he lived until April 1350. Then Battuta sailed to Gilbalter to join Spanish Muslims against the “the holy wars” of Spanish Christians who were driving them out of the peninsula. When he arrived, however, there was no fighting as Alfonso XI had died of the Black Death. Battuta, therefore, visited dignitaries in Muslim Spain as a tourist. In Malaga, he met the cadi and ate Valencian (sweet) oranges. From there he traveled on to Granada. It is doubted that he met Yusuf I (1333-1354), the sultan, due to his illness at the time but his mother sent him a purse of gold. There, Battuta met Iban Juzayy who created poetry and wrote about law and history. Abu 'Inan Faris (d. 1358), the Sultan of Morocco, brought him to Fez where demanded that he dictate the story of his travels. Ibn Juzayy was appointed to inscribe the account. The Rihla, the work, has survived and is valued today for the light it sheds on medieval history. It relates dangers and adventures, bandit attacks, a near drowning as a boat sank, a close shave as a tyrant ordered him to be beheaded, some marriages, lovers and children as a result. Other descriptions include women’s roles, religious matters, current politics, economics and other social matters such as cookery and “strange plants”. He makes particular mention of foods connected with the medieval attitude toward hospitality including "luqumât al-qâdi," (“the Cadi’s Morsels.”) in Volume III, p. 757 of the translation of his work by H.A.R. Gibb and p. 139 of the translation by Mahdi Husain. The latter gives the Arabic, the former only the English.These are bits of pastry fried with or without pistachios, almonds or pinenuts. The recipes are included in the Anon Andalus and Fadalat. See bocados, published on March 22, 2012 for the Andalus recipe. [Anón/Huici. 1966:268:156:ftn 97; Ibn Razīn/Granja. 1960:48:21; ES: Anon/Perry. Sep 5, 02:ftn 97; ES: Alhabshi. Nov 30, 01; and ES: “Travels.” Dec 22, 99.]

MORSELS FOR THE JUDGE ADAPTED FROM FADALAT
#48 CONFECCIÓN DE "BOCADITOS DEL CADI” p. 21

Ingredients

Filling:
Hedgehogs Tarts
(by the Chef who got carried 
away and had to bake them!)
Photoby EvaApple
3 c sugar
2/3 c orange blossom water
1 c peeled and ground almonds
1 tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp ground cloves

Dough:
1 pkg dry yeast
½ c warm water
3/4 c scalded milk
1/3 c butter
1/4 c sugar
2 eggs
5 c. flour
1 pinch of salt

Extra virgin olive oil for frying

Garnish:
powdered sugar

Preparation

Filling:

Place sugar in orange blossom water in a large heavy saucepan. Heat, stirring until sugar dissolves. Turn up heat and bring to a boil. Cover and let boil for 3 minutes. Uncover and let boil until it becomes a soft ball.

Place the bottom of the saucepan in the cold water in a sink, stirring the sugar mixture constantly until it becomes thick and creamy.

Add the ground almonds and spices. Return to the stove over low heat. Stir for 2 minutes until mixture is thick.

Spoon filling onto the workspace, turning it with a metal spatula until it cools enough to be touched.


Dough:

Put the yeast in warm water. Blend milk, butter and sugar with the yeast. Add eggs and 1 c. flour, beat well. Add the rest of the flour slowly. Knead 8 - 10 min. Place in a sprayed or greased bowl. Cover, let rise until doubled. Roll and cut into circles. Place a spoonful of filling on each circle. Fold over and shape it like almonds.

Deep fry them. Sprinkle sugar over them and serve.

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

BASTIMENTO, ABASTECIMIENTO WITH 13TH C VALENTINE'S SPECIAL MARZIPAN!

Legumes
Photo by: mrsamper

essential provisions in a house or a city, the action and effect of supplying. Nola advises that it is the overseer's duty to obtain quality provisions at the best prices available. In some cases, this required a great deal of planning ahead. Provisions such as sugar were purchased in Seville, for example, to supply noble households in northern provinces for one entire year. [Nola/Pérez. 1994:72:190]

MARZIPAN, A “FRUIT” MADE OF SUGAR
ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #485LA FĀKIHA DE AZÚCAR, p 265


Ingredients

Super Tiny Marzipan Hearts
Photo from: SteelCityFlan
4 c granulated sugar
4 c ground almonds
1 1/3 c rosewater
food coloring
almond oil

Preparation

Sprinkle a workspace, such as a marble slab or wooden cutting board, with almond oil. Fill the sink with cold water.

Place sugar in 1 1/3 c rosewater in a large heavy saucepan. Heat stirring until sugar dissolves. Turn up heat and bring to a boil. Cover and let boil for 3 minutes. Uncover and let boil until it becomes a soft ball.

Place the bottom of the saucepan in the cold water in the sink, stirring the sugar mixture constantly until it becomes thick and creamy.

Add the ground almonds. Return to the stove over low heat. Stir for 2 minutes until mixture is thick.
Spoon marzipan onto the workspace, turning it with a metal spatula until it cools enough to be touched.

Coat hands almond oil and begin to knead the marzipan, working it until it is smooth. Color and shape it at will.

Serve immediately or wrap in in plastic wrap and store it in an airtight container.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

BASTARDA WITH 15TH C "FAKE" CAMELINE SAUCE RECIPE

Bactrian camel
Photo by: 'Ebe

1. female bastard. 2. imitation, false, fake. [ES: Carroll-Mann. Guisados 2-art. Jun 6, 01:104:ftn 126; and Nola. 1989:lii-1]

*FAKE CAMELINE SAUCE TO ACCOMPANY MEAT OR FISH
ADAPTED FROM NOLA'S BASTARDA CAMELINA, lii-1

365 Nov 18

Ingredients

¼ c toasted almonds
1 slice of toasted bread (about ¼ c ground)
2 chicken livers
1 c sour pomegranate juice from 2-3 pomegranates tempered with vinegar
1 c beef broth
1 tsp cinnamon
¼ tsp ground ginger
¼ tsp cardamom
¼ tsp mace
¼ tsp long pepper
1 tbsp butter

garnish:
1 tsp sugar
1 tsp cinnamon

Grind the almonds in a food processor. Add the bread with the chicken livers. Add the pomegranate juice and broth. Blend well and add the spices. Strain the mixture into a saucepan. Heat on the mixture and stir until it begins to thicken. Add the butter. When melted and blended into the sauce, taste for sweetness and sourness. Correct using vinegar and/or sugar if necessary.

Sprinkle sugar and cinnamon on top and serve.

*It is not known why Nola calls this a “fake” when he gives two other recipes for Cameline Sauce and does not call them “fakes.” There has been a discrepancy about the name as there are no camels in the sauce! Some believe it is misspelled and should be Caneline Sauce for the cinnamon, which is the same color as camels.

Monday, February 20, 2012

BARRIL, WITH 15TH C ANCHOVIES FROM A BARREL RECIPE

Barrel End
Photo from: Craftsman1

OCast varril, Eng barrel, cask, keg. It was used to store water, wine, ale and other liquids as well as salted meat and fish, olives and olive oil.  See cañada, azacán, and vasija. [Baena. 1993:687:56:781; and Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:41]


ANCHOVIES FROM A BARREL RECIPE ADAPTED FROM NOLA SAYTON EN CAÇUELA #lxv-1

Ingredients

*2 ½ lb salted anchovies
1 tsp freshly ground pepper
2 garlic cloves mashed
½ c raisins chopped and seeds removed
½ c almonds blanched, skinned and chopped
½ c pine nuts
1 tbsp fresh basil chopped
barrels of fishes
Photo by: jiformales
1 tbsp fresh parsley chopped
2 tbsp capers
2 tbsp virgin olive oil
1 c dry white wine

Preparation

Nola instructs that the head should be removed the head and any black intestines as these make anchovies bitter. If buying salted anchovies from a barrel this will be done. Wash each one well in cold water. Open the insides and remove the backbone. Remove the tail and residual skin. Soak them in cold water for three hours, changing it often.  Rinse anchovies one more time and pat dry with paper towels. Mix all the ingredients together and put them in a pot to simmer on a burner. Turn them from time to time until the smell of raw fish disappears.

*Nola’s recipe is for anchovies. Herrings or sardines could be used instead.

Friday, February 17, 2012

BARRIGA WITH “SIKBĀŶ” VEAL STEW, A SUMMER DISH FOR YOUNG BELLIES


cow-belly
Photo by: chati21
belly. [Pers. Memories. Slaughters Mostoles. 2000:2001:2003]

 “SIKBĀŶ” VEAL A SUMMER DISH FOR YOUNG BELLIES
ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF AL-ANDALUS #194 p. 124
For 4 persons

Ingredients

1 lb meat from around a veal belly
4  veal shanks on bones
1/4 c virgin olive oil
2 tbsp vinegar
1 c  finely chopped onions
1 tbsp fresh cilantro
1 c sliced almonds
1 tsp salt
Veal stew
Photo by: Applekore
1 tsp pepper
½  tsp caraway
½ tsp dried cilantro
2 citron leaves
1 tbsp rue
2 stalks of celery with leaves
4 stalks of heath
7 tsp sugar
¾ tsp cassia
¾ tsp mashed saffron
½ lb boiled and mashed squash
1 garlic clove, mashed
1/2 c raisins, seeds removed
2 egg yolks
2 tbsp flour 

Preparation

Seal and brown veal in oil in a heavy pot for stewing. Pour off access oil. Add vinegar and enough water to cover the meat by more than four fingers. Increase the amount of vinegar if more acidity is desired. Add onion chopped with fresh cilantro.  Add almonds,  salt,  pepper. caraway and dried cilantro. Tie citron leaves, rue, celery and heath stalks in a bunch and add them to the pot. Simmer for 1 hour. When it is half done, add sugar, cassia and saffron. Add squash, a mashed garlic and raisins, and when done discard the bunch of leaves and stalks. Put the solids on a bowl and thicken the sauce with a mixture of beaten egg yolks and flour or breadcrumbs. Pour the sauce over the stew and serve.


Thursday, February 16, 2012

BARREÑO WITH 15TH C RECIPE FOR CHEESE FRITTERS

Dumbo
Photo by globolandia_doc
tub; large receptacle made of earthenware or metal, similar to a chamber-pot but larger (plastic today). It was used for everything from food storage to washing kitchen items and clothing. During the 10th C in León they were commonly made of glazed earthenware. They were used for washing hands before eating and other items. It is synonymous with terrizo (earthen tub). [Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:32; Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:46; and Serradilla. 1993:34] 

CHEESE FRITTERS ADAPTED FROM
NOLA'S FRUTA DE QUEFO FREFCO xlvii-4
For 1 person

Ingredients

½ c fresh ewe’s cheese
1 tbsp flour
2 eggs
salt to taste
1 tsp white pepper
Cheese Fritters
(in a small “tub” just before serving)
Photo by fabricyoyoqueen
1 pinch of mustard powder
1 tbsp lard
1 tbsp honey
1 tbsp rosewater
1 tsp sugar

Preparation

Grind cheese and put it in a tub. Sift flour and add it to the cheese. Beat eggs and add them. Season the mixture. When all is well mixed, shape the dough into small balls. Heat a frying pan and melt the lard. When very hot, add the fritters. Pour half the honey and the rosewater over them while frying. When done put it on a plate and sprinkle with sugar and pour a drizzle of honey over it before serving.

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

BARIGADA WITH RECIPE FOR STUFFED PIG'S STOMACH

Botillo del Bierzo
Photo from: Reino de León
pig or pork belly. After the pig is slaughtered, the stomach is scraped and meat from the tail, ribs and loins is chopped on a huge wooden plate in the shape of a spittle with a machete and then with knives and scissors before stuffing it into the stomach with a few odd bones. The meat is kneaded and marinated in oregano, paprika (today, long pepper in the Middle Ages), garlic, salt and white wine. The entire family is present during this process as everyone has an opinion concerning the quantities of seasoning to be added. After the stomach is stuffed and sewn up, it is smoked for a month or more. It is thought that the stomachs should be round like the abbot’s for bony or weak ones look like those made in a poor home or monastery. When well dried, the stomach is pricked with cabbage root to prevent the bag from breaking open when cooked for if it breaks the flavor is lost. Then it is boiled in water and salt. Cabbage is added to the pot when half boiled.  Traditionally, it is eaten on Christmas Eve, New Years, Kings’ Day (January 6th) and Shrove Tuesday. Then the stomach is brought to the dinner table in an earthenware dish and eaters are given escudiellas, wooden plates from the meat smoking room.  The Province of Leon, especially the Bierzo Region, is famous for stuffed pig stomachs, which are called botellos. No pilgrimage on the Way of St. James is complete without eating it. Not all pig stomachs met their end on the dinner table. Some became soccer balls before the invention of rubber. That is why soccer is a winter sport as pigs traditionally are slaughtered in November. The soccer season ended when the pig’s stomach was no longer repairable. [Ares. 1994: 96-97:112; Pers. Memories. Slaughters Mostoles. 2000:2001:2003]

RECIPE FOR STUFFED PIG'S STOMACH

Ingredients

1 small pig’s stomach (today this can be ordered from the local butcher)
Botillo, cachelos, chorizo, garbanzos y repollo.
(Pig's stomach, boiled potatoes chickpeas and cabbage)
5 shallots
2 mashed garlic cloves
¼ c virgin olive oil
2 ½ lbs meat from the loins, ribs and tail including bones and fat
1 ½ lb chorizo
*1 c long grain rice
salt and pepper (long pepper if possible) to taste
2 tsp oregano
1 sprig parsley chopped
1 c white wine

Preparation

Gently fry the shallots and garlic in olive oil until transparent. Remove from the heat and let cool.

Mix the meat, chorizo, shallots, garlic, raw rice, seasoning and wine. Knead well. Cover and let it marinate overnight.

Soak the stomach in water overnight. The following day, wring it out and tie 2 of the 3 openings with string.

Fill the stomach with the  marinated stuffing. Tie the opening with a string. Hang the stomach from the kitchen rafters or other dry place and leave for one month or more.

When ready to eat, soak 1 c chickpeas in water the night before.

The next day, fill a large pot with well-salted water. Prick to stomach to prevent it from exploding. Add it to the pot and simmer just below boiling point for 2 ½ hours.

When half done, put the chickpeas in a cloth bag, tie it and add them with a small cabbage to the pot.

When done place all in an earthenware dish. Have the carver slice the stomach into strips ½” thick.

*Today it would be 2 lbs potatoes.

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

BARCOS WITH A TASTE OF THE SLAUGHTER

"Barcos" for Five Pigs
(plates weren't big enough!)
Photo from: Lord-Williams

big porcelain plates where chunks of meat are placed after the slaughter. [Pers. Memories. Slaughters Mostoles. 2000-2001: 2003; and Serradilla. 1993:140]

A TASTE OF THE SLAUGHTER FROM SERRADILLA'S PRUEBA DE MATANZA p 100

Ingredients

Amounts are in accordance with the number of people working during the slaughter and preparation of meat

Pepe holding The "Prueba"
Justito checking for more lean meat!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Stuffing for chorizos: ground lean meat
Paprika (long pepper and wine) 
Oregano 
Garlic
Sal

Preparation

Mix the seasoning with the meat and let stand.

Fry it in a frying pan, moving slowly.

Eat warm. 

Monday, February 13, 2012

BARBO WITH 15TH BARBEL EMPANADA RECIPE

Switch to Meat on Coloured Rivers - Four
Photo by: Bait-Tech
OCast barvo, L. Barbus vulgaris, Eng. barbel. This is a large European fresh-water fish of the Carp family with barbells or fleshy filaments hanging from the mouth region. It lives at the bottom of swift-flowing rivers feeding on fish found there. The average weight is 4-5 lbs but it can weigh as much as 26 lbs. It is thought that pilgrims on the Way of St. James caught them in the Cea River in Leon as long ago as the 12th C. [ES: Carroll-Mann. Guisados 2-art. Jun 6, 01:134; Nola. 1989:lviii-1; Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:155; and Villena/Calero. 2002:23a]

BARBEL EMPANADA 
ADAPTED FROM NOLA'S BARBO EN PAN lviii-1
Four 4 persons

Ingredients

Empanada Gallega @ Los Cachitos

Photo by: anapeps
Leaf Fat Pastry Adapted from Fadalat #60
*2/3 c leaf lard
2 c semolina or fine flour
¾ tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
1/3 c ice water

Filling

½ tsp freshly ground pepper
½ tsp grated ginger
Salt to taste
1-2 barbells depending on size
¼ c orange juice or rosewater
1 tbsp virgin olive oil

Preparation

Soak barbell in salted water 2-3 hours.

Dip hands in lard and knead the flour with water, salt and baking powder.

Melt lard, extend a piece of dough as thin as possible kneading board. Pour lard over it, fold it over, extend it again, hit it with the palm of the hand. Squeeze a piece of dough between two fingers. If it holds together, transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface, if not add 1 or 2 tsp cold water, knead and test again.

Knead the flour into a ball. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate for ½ hr.

Gently pouch the fish in water for 5 min. or until done. Do not let it boil or fish will be broken. When done remove the skin and the bones.

Divide the pastry in half. Roll out one half to fit the greased or oiled baking sheet.

Mix the species with barbell flesh and put on the pastry. Sprinkle orange juice or rosewater over it.

Preheat oven to 350º F / 175º C

Roll out the other half of the pastry and place that on top of the filling.

Bake 30 minutes or until done.



Friday, February 10, 2012

BANQUETA WITH 13TH C RECIPE FOR “AL-ŶIMLĪ,” MEAT AND ALMOND DISH

Day 98/365 Banqueta
stool, bench, long seat. In medieval times, they were made of wood similar to those today and used as a common piece of kitchen furniture. [Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:31]

“AL-ŶIMLĪ,” MEAT AND ALMOND DISH ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN/AL-ANDALUS #13 PLATO AL-ŶIMLĪ, p 21
For 4 persons

Ingredients

¼ c virgin olive oil
½ lb veal or lamb
½ lb ground veal or lamb
1 tsp freshly ground pepper
“Al-Ŷimlī,” Meat and Almond Dish
Photo by: Lord-Williams
½ tsp coriander
¼ tsp cumin
1 tsp mashed saffron
¼ c vinegar
1/8 c Byzantine murri (see almorí, published on August 25, 2011 for recipe)
4 citron leaves
½ c slices almonds
2 eggs
¼  tsp cinnamon
1 tsp mashed saffron

Preparation

Sit down on a kitchen stool.

Cut meat into small pieces. Make meatballs the size of walnuts. Dissolve the saffron in the vinegar. Put the olive oil in a pot and heat. Seal and brown the meat in the pot. Add the seasoning, vinegar, murri, citron leaves and almonds. Cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally until the meat is cooked, about 15-20 minutes. Beat the eggs with the cinnamon. Dissolve the 2nd tsp of saffron in them. Cover the contents of the with the egg mixture. Turn off the heat. Leave the pot on the hearth until the eggs bind, the fat rises and the broth evaporates.

Thursday, February 9, 2012

BAÑOS WITH RECIPE FOR SELECT CHORIZOS FROM ARAGON


Ines, mother and daughter, Washing Pig Intestines
Photo by: Lord-Williams
tubs, vats made of white porcelain or glazed earthenware (today, plastic). They are used for washing pigs intestines after it is slaughtered. [Serradilla. 1993:34]

SELECT CHORIZOS FROM ARAGON 
ADAPTED FROM ANA CASTAÑER #151 SELECTOS CHORIZOS DE ARAGON, p 127

Ingredients

22 lbs pork without fat
1 c + 3 tbsp salt
*7/8 c sweet paprika
*1 tbsp hot paprika
5 tbsp oregano
10 garlic cloves mashed

Justo Kneading Chorizo
Preparation

Put meat through a meat grinder. Knead the meat with the seasoning. If the mass is too dense sprinkle water over it and continue kneading. Cover and leave 48 hours-

Put the mass into the sausage machine. Connect an intestine to it and fill it. Tie it and prick it. Hang it in a cool place without ventilation for 10 days or until cured.

*Paprika is not medieval but used as a meat preservative. To do it the medieval way use long pepper and wine instead of paprika.

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

BANDULLO WITH 13th C HISPANO-ARAB "HAGGIS"

Pot Belly Seahorse
Photo by: Saspotato
Leon vanduyo OCast vanduja, Eng stomach; tripe. [Ares. Cocina. 1994:126; and Madrid. 1980:16:20]


13th C HISPANO-ARAB "HAGGIS" ADAPTED FROM  FADALAT # 86 OTRO PLATO ALCUZCUZ, p 23


*Ingredients


1 lamb stomach
2 tbsp lamb fat
1 tsp salt
1 tsp nutmeg
½ tsp pepper
½ tsp mace
2 garlic cloves mashed
5 c steamed couscous
1 tbsp lamb fat sheep’s heart, lungs and liver (thoroughly cleaned), chopped
1 tsp spikenard
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp mastic
2 onions, finely chopped
3 c ground lamb meat with fat
1 c mutton or beef broth


X11_0291
Stuffed Stitched Stomach
Photo by: 
neonzu1
Garnish:
2 tsp cinnamo
1 tsp spinkenard


Slit the throat of a lamb and cut open the stomach. Remove the entrails. Remove the stomach. Clean it and smear the inside by hand with plenty of lamb fat mixed with the spices and garlic. When the couscous is steamed, mix it with the rest of the ingredients by hand. Moisten it with broth. Stuff the lamb's stomach and sow them up.


Preheat oven to 350º F / 175º C


Place it in the oven and roast until tender and sufficiently roasted, between 2-2 ½ hrs.


Untie the stomach and put the couscous and meat in a tureen, sprinkle with cinnamon and spikenard and serve.


*Amounts are subject to the size of the stomach.



Tuesday, February 7, 2012

BANCO DE MATAR

Pig on Slaughter Block
about to be slaughtered
Photo by: Lord-Williams

slaughter block. Usually, wooden table is used as a slaughter block to kill a pig. [Madrid. 1980: 11]

MARINATED SPARERIBS ADAPTED FROM SERRADILLA,
COSTILLAS EN ADOBO ASADAS, p 90

sparerib
Photo by HK-DMZ
Ingredients
2 k spareribs
1 garlic head sliced
1 tbsp freshly ground pepper
1 tbsp salt
2 tbsp oregano
water

Preparation

Mix the ingredients for the marinade and add enough water to cover the spare ribs with it.
Leave the ribs to marinate for 8 days.
When ready to eat them fry, grill or roast them

Monday, February 6, 2012

BANASTAS WITH 13TH C STUFFED EGG RECIPE

+banasta
Photo by : AmpaCar

hampers, large wicker baskets or those made with thin woven wood. They have been used for storing fish, collecting eggs, carrying picnic food and countless of other tasks. By the 11th C at least in León grapes to be pressed were placed in these baskets. [Sánchez Albornoz. 2000:115]




STUFFED EGGS ADAPTED FROM FADALAT
#310 OTRO PLATO, pp 28-29

Ingredients

6 eggs
salt to taste
½ tsp freshly ground pepper to taste
1 raw egg
1/3 c cream cheese
virgin olive oil for frying
Stuffed Eggs
Photo by: Lord-Williams
½ tsp freshly ground ginger
1/2 tsp freshly ground cinnamon
½ tsp freshly ground cloves
½ tsp spikenard
1 tsp chopped cilantro
½ c mint water

Garnish
1 tsp cinnamon
mint leaves

Sauce:
2 raw eggs
2 ½ tbsp white vinegar
2 tbsp honey
½ tsp saffron
salt and pepper to taste

Preparation

Prepare hard boiled eggs by boiling them in water. When done cool them in cold water. Peel them and cut them in half lengthwise. Remove the yolks and place them on a plate. Sprinkle them with ground salt, spices and cilantro. Mash the yolks with the spices, cilantro, mint water, raw egg and cream cheese until well mixed. Shape this paste into the form of egg yolks; put them back inside the egg whites.

Preheat oven to 300º F / 150º C

Heat a frying pan and add oil. Bring it to a boil and carefully add the eggs face down. Leave until golden brown then turn and brown the other side. Place them in an oiled baking dish face up. Wisk all the ingredients together for the sauce in a bowl and pour the sauce over the eggs.  Bake them face up for 10-15 until the yolks are set. Place them in a serving bowl. Present them sprinkled with cinnamon on top and a mint leaf or two.

Friday, February 3, 2012

BALLENA

Right whales
(friendly acrobats of the sea)
Photo from: NatGeo

OCast vallena, L.Eubalaena glacialis, Eng. Biscayan right whale. This warm-blooded fishlike mammal breaths air, gives birth to live babies, and is found in the Bay of Biscay, the Azores, NW Africa and between the Mediterranean and Iceland. In the 12th C commercial whaling began in the Bay of Biscay. Then and until 1860, when the whaling industry boomed, it was the most common species harpooned as it is a slower and smaller species than others. An average right whale weighs about 96 t and is 16-17 m. long. The oil from it was used for heating and illumination and as a lubricant, soap and margarine. The right whale was named for the large quantity of oil in its body. There is so much that it even floats when dead, therefore, it is just “right” to catch. Ambergris was obtained from its intestines, see ámbar gris. The sinews are used to string tennis rackets. The hormone content of the pancreas, pituitary glands and thyroid now is used in scientific research. The teeth are made into buttons, jewelry and pipes. The roof of the mouth is converted into glue. Bones are cut to stiffen corsets and other garments. Only Villena mentions the consumption of the meat. As it is heavy food, it is not served often. The meat is tough and chopped into small pieces. Recipes are lacking in medieval cookery manuscripts, perhaps whalers and their families took care of that before it could reach the king’s table. Salted, however, the meat can be kept for a long time. Today it is in the top ten of most endangered animals in the world. See untos. [ES: Whales. Apr 28, 03; and Villena/Calero. 2002:23a:37b]