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Friday, November 30, 2012

CHAMBERIL WITH GOLDEN SOPES RECIPE


Hanging
(with a commercialized gambrel stick)
Photo from: WrjDavis
gambrel stick. It is used to separate legs of pig when hung after slaughter to facilitate the drainage of blood. [Ares. “Comidas.” 1994:111; Ares. Gastronomía. 2000:75; and Pers. Memories. Slaughters Mostoles. 2000-2001:2003]

GOLDEN SOPES ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S liii-1 SOPAS DORADAS[1]

Ingredients

4 slices of bread
1 qt beef broth
4 egg yolks
1 tsp freshly grated ginger
1 c grated cheese

Preparation

Golden Soppes Spinkled with Herbs
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Slice bread and toast the slices. Make a fatty beef broth. Skim it. Grate the cheese.  When ready to eat, remove the broth from heat and add beaten egg yolks. Blend them with the broth. Add ginger. Put a slice of bread in each soup bowl. Pour the broth over them and sprinkle the cheese on top and serve.



[1] This is a very simple recipe used the day of the slaughter. By lunchtime all are tired and hungry for the slaughter begins a little after sunrise. After sacrificing the pig, the hair and muck is burned with grass. Then the intestines and other inners are removed before the pig is hung on the branch of a tree and legs pulled open to insert the gambrel stick or old broom stick. Then the pig is left to bleed overnight and all break for lunch before beginning to prepare sausages. 

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

CHARLOTA WITH 13TH C CHARD OR SPINACH DIP RECIPE


Shallots
Photo from: joeysplanting
ascalonia, Cat escaluña, escalunya, L. Allium ascalonicum, Ar. bişal, Fr. échalotte, OE chybolles, Eng. spring onions, U.S. scallion, Aust shallot, green onion, Spanish garlic. Some authors claim that it came from Syria, while others maintain that Jacques Daléchamps (1513-1588), French botanist and doctor of medicine, was responsible for its introduction in England in 1587 but it does not appear to be incorporated in English sauces and salads until 1664. Until the 17th C, the word did not exist in the English language. Still others, on the contrary, declare although the origin is not known, during the Middle Ages it did exist in Andalusia and was an important seasoning in cooking and pickling. Like garlic, the shallot is a bulb but it is slender, elongated and milder. Although it was found to be more digestible than the onion and the flavor more delicate, the same uses apply, see cebolla. The shallot rarely flowers or produces seeds. The bulbs are planted between September and November or in January or February, depending upon the climate in deep, rich soil. See cebolla. [Curye. 1985:178; Stuart. 1987:148; Usher. 1974:33; Villena/Brown: 1984:45:63:73:83:99; Villena/Calero. 2002:99:23a; Villena/Navarro.1879:44; and Villena/Saínz. 1969:136]

SILQ BI-LABAN  (CHARD IN YOGHURT) ADAPTED FROM KITAB AL-TABIKH (A BAGHDAD COOKERY BOOK, 13TH C)[1]

Grating Nutmeg
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients:
¼ c olive oil
2 shallots[2] chopped
2 garlic cloves chopped
1 lb spinach[3]
½ c yogurt
2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp ginger
½ tsp nutmeg
½ tsp freshly ground cloves
salt to taste
pepper to taste

Serve with slices of flat bread for dipping

Preparation

Heat a frying pan. Add oil. Add scallions and gently fry until translucent. Add the garlic when scallions begin to become soft. Add spinach and reduce heat. Stir, cover and leave it for another minute or until withered. 

Refreshing Dip Any Time of Year
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Remove from heat and let cool.

Chop spinach with scallions and put mixture in a bowl and add yogurt, salt and pepper. Mix well and chill.

Serve as a dip with thin slices of flatbread.


[1] Found in Perry’s “Description,” p 398.
[2] As shallots are only available during the summer, onions are used as a substitute at other times of year.
[3] Spinach was used instead of Swiss chard.

Monday, November 26, 2012

CETRERÍA WITH 14TH C RECIPE FOR BLANCMANGE


Cetrería
Photo from: arte&vida
falconry, hawking. This was a medieval art learned by noble men as well as ladies. See cinegética and halcón. [Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:222]

SHREDDED BLANCMANGE ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ L QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FFER MAYAR BLANCH DEFFILAT, pp 94-95
For 6 persons

Ingredients

3½ lb birds[1]
1 onion
1 c rosewater
1 qt almond milk
7 oz rice flour
2 tbsp sugar

Shredded Chicken in Rosewater
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Garnish:
Cinnamon or thyme leaves


Preparation

Scorch and clean the chicken well. Boil it in 3 qts water with the onion skinned and quartered. When cooked, take the chicken out of the broth and let it cool. Disgard the onion. Remove skin and bones from the chicken. Shred the meat and put it in a deep bowl with the rosewater.

A Deliciously Rich Cream of Chicken that Never Fails!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Boil the broth until reduced to approximately 1 qt (if there is a lot of grease, skim some off), add almond milk and gently boil it. Stir it with a wooden spoon while adding the flour; keep stirring while it thickens. Add the chicken with the rosewater and sugar and let it cook 8-10 minutes more, stirring constantly. If a more liquid consistency is desired, add more broth. Serve in soup bowls. If more sweetness is desired sprinkle sugar on top. If more aroma is desired add more rosewater.

Garnish at will with cinnamon or thyme.



[1]Birds caught by hawking; otherwise used chicken.

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

CESTO, -A, WITH 15TH C RECIPE FOR RICE IN MEAT BROTH



Baskets / Cestos
Photo from: 
CGoulao
basket. Over the centuries baskets have been made with rush, straw, wicker, willow and other plant products. Avenzoar relates that date palm leaflets were used to make baskets. Sánchez-Albornoz relates how fruits, vegetables and nuts were displayed in baskets at market in Leon during the 10th C. Fadalat uses baskets for baked loaves of bread and for  homemade noodles while shaping them. The Anón 13th C Al-Andalus document provides a recipe for Khubaiz (little bread) made in Niebla in which wheat, after washing, was put in a rush basket and stomped on to soften it. Later on in the same recipe, starch is put in a rush basket to whiten and crumble it. The Archpriest of Hita explains that on Ash Wednesday Christian households were cleaned including the baskets. Nola uses baskets filled with bran in which pots are submerged with rice, groats or eggplants when cooked. They are left covered with bran in the baskets until the steam has settled, between on half hour to an hour. In the latter two recipes the baskets are covered with a cloth. [Anón/Huici. 1966:158:103; ES: Lord. “Culinary,” Aug 15, 08; Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:80; Nola. 1989:xxvi-2:lxxi-1:xli-2; Ruiz/Buey. 1965:1174b:186; Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:41-42:ftn 48]

RICE IN MEAT BROTH ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S xxvi-2 ARROZ CON CALDO DE CARNE

Boiling Rice after Goat's Milk Added
Photo by: Lord-William
Ingredients

1 c rice
1 ½ c fatty meat broth
salt to taste
½ c goat, ram or almond milk
3-4 c bran
2 egg yolks

Garnish:
1 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp cinnamon

Wash the rice in cold or tepid water three or four times. When well washed, dry it on a cutting board in the sun, or if there is none place it near the fire. When dried remove any pebbles or dirt. Then heat a clean pot with fatty and well-salted meat broth. Bring it to a boil and add the rice. When half cooked (about 10 minutes) add goat or ram’s milk or if not available add almond milk. Boil all together stirring from time to time to prevent sticking or burning.

Rice with Goats Milk
Produced Sticky Rice with a Uniquely Delicious Flavor!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
When done remove it from the heat and place the pot, covered with a lid, in a basket and cover that with bran. Let sit for ½ hr – 1 hr. Beat egg yolks and mix them with the rice. Pour this into soup bowls and garnish with sugar and cinnamon.

It should be noted that as per the chapter on semolina that pottages such as rice, semolina, peeled wheat or barley and noodles, when cooked in meat broth do not require the addition of milk, nor is it necessary to garnish the bowls with sugar but these steps have been taken to please the appetites of the eaters. Further, the addition of sugar never hurt a dish. All is according to taste.

CERVEZA ÁRABE WITH RECIPE FOR "ARAB BEER"


Ar. fuqqa (near beer), Eng. Arab beer, an Arab beverage made with barley, wheat, rock salt and/or other ingredients. There are various recipes. Sometimes walnuts were added for flavor. The most exotic contains honey, pepper, cloves, garlic, ginger and rue. It may be left to ferment in leather sacks (kir) for two days or not at all. Some recipes may take up to three days to make while others are simpler. [ES: Benavides–Barajas.“Cocina.” Sep 29, 01; and Perry. “Description.” 2001:440]

FUQQA MADHKHUR ADAPTED FROM PERRY’S “DESCRIPTION OF FAMILIAR FOODS,” p 440

Ingredients

As the Brew Boils. . .
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 c barley
2 c wheat flour
6 sprigs of mint
3 sprigs of rue
2 lemons
1 tbsp pomegranate seed if in season
2 lemons
6 tbsp sugar
½ c chopped raisins
½ c honey or date molasses

Garnish for each glass:
Sprigs of mint
Slices of lemon


Preparation

Dry the barley and grind it. Add wheat flour. Put this in a large pot and cover with water. Bring it to a boil and pour it into a pressure cooker.  Tightly screw on the cover and put the pressure knob on to prevent the fumes from coming out. Pour it back into the pot and fill it to the brim with water.  Bring it to a boil. (It was then poured back into the pressure cooker. Tightly cover and let sit three days until it becomes clear.

Cool, Refreshing, Sweet and Sour "Beer"
Photo by: Lord-Williams
The barley and wheat sink to the bottom in a big lump leaving turbid tasteless water on top. Put a quart of this water with ¼th of the hunk of barley and wheat mixture in a food processor and ground until a creamy liquid results. Pour this into a large bowl.

Store the remaining barley-wheat mixture in an airtight container for use another day.


Put mint and rue leaves in a food processor with the juice from the lemons, and a little barley water to chop the leaves. Add this mixture to the creamy liquid with the lemon, sugar, chopped raisins and honey. Stir well and pour into glasses. Add a slice of lemon and a sprig of mint for garnish in each glass.



Monday, November 19, 2012

CERVATO WITH RAN'S ROAST VENISON RECIPE

Cervato en invierno
Photo from: mrosacm

OCast enodio, 3-5 year old deer. [Villena/Calero. 2004:22b]

RAN’S RECIPE FOR ROAST VENISON[1]

3 lbs venison or beef steak, cubed into 1” pieces
1 c. wine vinegar
1 c. cold water
1 onion, sliced
1 bay leaf
2 whole cloves
1 garlic clove
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. pepper
6 slices of bacon
¼ c lard
3 onions sliced
1 ¼ c dry red wine
2 c baby mushrooms 

No one could tell it was beef!
It melts in your mouth!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Test the fat by removing a piece and frying it in a frying pan. If it tastes like mucky marsh water remove all the fat from the deer. If the fried fat tastes good, keep the fat on it. 

Remove all the internal organs including the spleen and lymph nodes.

Marinate the meat in vinegar, water, 1 onion and spices for 3 days, turning each day.

PREHEAT OVEN TO 300º F/ 150º C

Melt the lard in a roasting pan. Line it with bacon. Add the deer with the marinade. Combine the remaining ingredients in a large bowl and pour them over the deer. Roast uncovered for 4 hrs.



[1] When over 65 and pursuing his hobby of gardening, Ran bought a rifle for the first time in his life to settle matters with the deer. After a hard morning planting 50 pansies, he went to the kitchen, fixed a sandwich. Sat down at the kitchen table and on the other side of the window were 6 deer muching on the pansy flowers in the flower box. He found this ancient recipe among his ancestor's belongs and had it ready for his wife to roast the beast. After years of waiting for him to shot just one deer, she broke down and made this recipe with beef!

Friday, November 16, 2012

CERRÓN WITH 14TH C RECIPE FOR MORTEROL


Enzurronados
Lambs 3 hours old. The shepherd had to move on!

Photo from: Hurti
cerrona (Ast), OCast, zurrón, blaço, çorronblaço (brazo, arm), 1. sack or bag in which grain is taken to the mill to be ground. 2. lunch box, sheep or goat leather bag, not tanned with the hair on the outside used by shepherds to carry cocido, tocino or other food to eat. See cocido, ración and tocino. [Ares. “Comidas.” 1994:84:95:102; Dialecto. 1947:177; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:260; Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:159; and Ruíz/Brey. 1965:1031c:169]

MORTEROL [A GROUND MEAT DISH] OF MEAT WITHOUT MILK ADAPTED FROM SENTI SOVÍ CVI QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FFER MORTEROL DE CARN MENYS DE LET[1] p 135
For 6 persons

Ingredients

Mixing all the Ingredients Together
Photo by: Lord.Williams
9 oz chicken
10 ½ oz mutton trotter
7 oz bacon
4 cloves
 7 oz peeled raw and chopped almonds
1 onion finely chopped
4 garlic cloves chopped
1 c breadcrumbs
1-2 tsp saffron mashed
2 whole eggs beaten
salt to taste

Preparation           

Put the chicken, trotter, bacon and cloves in a pan, generously cover with water and bring it to a boil. After boiling gently for 10 minutes, add the almonds and gently boil 10 more minutes. When the meat is cooked remove the pan from the heat and separate the solids from the broth except the almonds. Let the almonds and the broth sit for 5 or 6 hours. Filter them through a cheesecloth.

Morterol Lovers Eat it Cold with Bread
Photo b: Lord-Williams
Heat a saucepan. Add lard and the onion. When almost translucent add the garlic cloves and fry them a little. Add the almond milk. When it begins to boil add the breadcrumbs stirring to take care that lumps do not form. Grind the meat that was boiled in a mortar and add them to the pot. Gently boil ½ hour. Add enough saffron to make the dish light yellow. Remove the pot from the heat, add the eggs, stirring well to mix them with the other ingredients. Add salt to taste. The consistency it should be a paste.



[1] This is a typical dish from the province of Cuenca. It is eaten with bread as hors d'oeuvres or with the first course of a meal. Everyone who carries a cerrón in Cuenca is some. The Spanish word morteruelo, morterol in Catalan, is derived from the word mortero, mortar meaning various meats ground and mashed after being boiled in water and with the addition of fats. The dish is completed with the addition of almond milk, thickened with egg yolks and colored with saffron to make it an eye catching dish.

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

CERNER WITH 13TH C SINÂB [MUSTARD SAUCE ] RECIPE


Cedazo (sifter) Compliments of Quinta Delía
Photo by; Lord-Williams
cernir, to sift, sieve, separate, bolt, divide, distinguish, discern decide, recognize. This word was used frequently in 14th and 15th C literature with a double meaning to indicate prudence and wisdom. See cedazo. [Anón/Huici. 1966: 73:52:74:53:79:52:80:57 etc; Ibn Razīn/Granja. 1960:95:24; and Nola. 1989:xii-1:xii-2:xiiii-6 etc]


RECIPE FOR MAKING SINÂB [MUSTARD] ADAPTED BY BRIDGET COFFMAN[1] FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF #80 RECETA PARA HACER SINÂB, p 57


Sinâb [Mustard Sauce]
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

2 tbsp butter
2 tbsp flour
4 tbsp ground mustard
2 tbsp honey
2 tbsp sliced almonds, ground in a food processor
1 tbsp water
8 tbsp vinegar[2]
Dash salt

Preparation[3]

In a small saucepan, make a roué of the flour and butter. Mix in the ground mustard; it will be a crumbly paste at this point. Add all of the remaining ingredients and cook over very low heat until smooth. Remove from heat immediately and allow to cool. Store in a glass jar in the refrigerator.



[1] Published in Portcullis Newsletter of the Barony of Brendoken, Volume VII - Issue 5– June 2008. http://www.brendoken.org/pdf/portcullis_2008_06.pdf It should be noted that her recipe does not include breadcrumbs or eggs, which are included in the original recipe. 
[2] One fourth cup strong vinegar was added as this mustard is very bland compared to Nola’s mustards published on this site. See blog titled cántaro published July 26, 2012 for Nola’s recipe for “Good French Mustard Sauce” and blog titled caldera published Jun 27, 2012 for Nola’s “French Mustard.”  The addition of more vinegar also gave the mixture a creamier texture.
[3] After washing and grinding mustard seeds, the original recipe instructs to sift them. 

Monday, November 12, 2012

CEREZA WITH PORTUGUESE SEPHARDIC HAROSET RECIPE



Photo by: Lord-Williams 
guinda, morello, L. Prunus cerasus, Ar. kerāsīya or abb al-mulūk, Fr cerise,OE cheseberien, chiseberien, chelberyes, cheseberyes, chyselbery, chiryse, chiryse, chiryes, cerise, cheryes, Eng cherry. Spaniards claim they were the first humans to eat cherries. The Romans liked them so much that they exported them from Iberia to Rome. 

Cherries came to signify love and divination. For this author, they did come to mean “love” when cherries dangled on trees at her grasp on the Way of St. James in the blazing sun in the month of May, when water was at a premium. Those from Cabreros del Río (León) are noted for their quality. They were eaten raw in the Middle Ages and made into marmalades and liquors. 

There are English medieval recipes for thick cherry pottages variably called chesebeien, chireseye, syrosye and chyryse. Although no meat was added to them, they were not fish-day dishes because of the grease and broth are included. 

Dates Soaking in Fresh Orange Juice
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Cherries were thought to engender plague and sweet cherries ruined teeth. Sweet and sour cherries were considered good for the stomach and restored the appetite. Avicena, like Hippocrates and Galen, thought that sweet and sour were in perfect harmony in the Al-Andalus diet. Sour dark red cherries (guindas, morellos) were used. Avenzoar explains that when ripe, they are inclined to heat, which makes them consolidate their moistening potential and their astringency diminishes, to the extreme that it is barely visible. For this, ripe cherries do not provoke nausea, loosen the abdomen or generate dark blood. On occasion, they produce gases and abdominal pain. It is best to eat them before breakfast than on a full stomach. The English served them before meals with grapes, bitter plums and damsons to make men happy. [Bolens. Cuisine. 1990:190:328; Castro. Alimentación. 1996:304; 61; Curye. 1985:177-178; ES: Gutiérrez. Jun 1, 98; ES: Herbs. Oct 8, 02; Font. Plantas. 1999:220:344-346; Gancedo. 1994:171; Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:78; Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:155; and Rickert. 1966:61]

PORTUGUESE SEPHARDIC HAROSET[1] COMPLIMENTS OF PHILLIPA SETON[2]

Haroset Garnished with Black Cherry Jam and Mint
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

1 lb. dates
6 oz. almonds
3 tbsp cherry jam
1 c fresh orange juice with pulp
3 tbsp of sweet grape wine, Cointreau[3] or sherry

Preparation

Scald almonds and peel them. Grind them to powder in the food processor.
Soak the dates in fresh orange juice to soften. Remove the pits and place the dates with the orange juice into a blender.

Remove the dates and mix them with the wine and cherry jam. Sprinkle the almond powder over the haroset before serving. [4]




[1] See blog titled castaña published September 6, 2012 for another Horoset recipe titled Charoset Truffles
[2] This recipe was published in Steven Florilegium’a fd-Jewish-msg dated December 26, 2002. Ms. Seton explains that it is a late period family recipe. Her family migrated from Portugal to Amsterdam in the 17th century. She “modestly” relates that this is the best haroset she has ever tasted! 
[3] This was not developed until the 19th C.
[4]Ms. Seton concludes: “As explained to me by my grandparents over 50 years ago, the concept is to make the haroset as the Torah quote - as black as pitch or morter but sweet as written in Shir Ha Shirim - shachora ani v'na'va -I am black and beautiful. We always served the "Portuguese haroset" on a small silver filigree plate which further enhanced the
hiddur mitzvah - making the mitzvah of observing pesach even more beautiful.


Friday, November 9, 2012

CERDO, PROHIBICIÓN DE WIITH LAMB EMPANADA RECIPE


Kosher food
Photo from: Verbal Jam
prohibition of pork. This applies to Jews and Muslims. For Hebrews, it was part of defining and discriminating to exemplify holiness. These prohibitions are outlined in the Quran in the mālikī in which illegal harām or illegal foods for Jews are listed. The hadīts, or proverbs of the Prophet, generally follow the same lines as the Hebrews. Here it is indicated clearly that eating pork is forbidden and punishable by God. Cloven-hoofed and cud chewing animals were considered proper food while pigs did not meet this criteria. Spaniards explain that the real reason for this is because if Jews ate pork they would loose their incentive to be rich. The Muslims, they explain, have so little regard for their lives when at war because they are dying to go to Paradise to eat Iberian ham. Castro, on the other hand, maintains that there was plenty of pork in Muslim lands during the Ommaide period and pigs continued to be raised in the Nazari kingdom. In the 15th C Ibn Srāŷ, a lawyer, recommended in one of his consultations that the farmers pay the wage of the swine herder. Castro continues by stating that Expiración García Sánchez, in La alimentación en Andalucía islámica affirms that it is possible that in rural areas pork was consumed in as much as Ibn Wāfif, in his Tratado de Agricultura, dedicated a chapter to slaughtering pigs. In spite of what has been said to date, the supposition that Hispanic Muslims ate pork cannot be proved. See camello. [Camba. 1995:90; Castro. Alimentación. 1994:167-168:229; and Misc. conversations with Spanish “hams.” n/d.]

“FERNANDO DE SORIA’S LAMB PIES[1]” FROM GITLIZ A DIZZLE OF HONEY, pp 229-231
Makes 10 empanadas

The Filling
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

Filling:
1-2 tbsp olive oil
1 onion chopped
1/4 lb lamb cut into 2” pieces[2]
½ tsp ground cardamom
½ tsp crushed fenugreek
½ tsp salt
½ tsp white pepper
¼ - ½ c water
½ c raisins (optional)

Spice Mixture:
¼ c chopped fresh cilantro or fresh parsley
1/3 c chopped onion
½-3/4 tsp cinnamon
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp white pepper
½ c hard cheese, such as Manchego[3]

Empanada Ready for Frying or Freezing
See Ftn 6
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Dough:
½ c water
½ c olive oil[4]
Pinch of salt
1½ c flour

2-4 tbsp olive oil

Honey for garnish

Preparation[5]

1.     In a large frying pan, heat the olive oil over high heat. Add the onion and lamb and fry until lightly browned, about 8 minutes.
2.     Stir in the cardamon, fenugreek, salt, and pepper.
3.     Add just enough water to barely cover the mixture (about 1/3 – ½ cup).
4.     Drain the meat mixture. You may reserve the broth for use in a stew some other time.
5.     Slice or chop the meat into small pieces. Place the meat mixture in a medium bowl.
6.     Combine the spices and cheese. Mix them thoroughly into the meat. Set aside or refrigerate.

Prepare the dough:
7.     Bring the 1/3 c water, oil, and salt to boil in a medium pan. Remove from heat. 
8.     When the liquid s tepid, add the flour all at once to the water mixture. Stir until all is well mixed.
9.     Place an egg-size lump of dough on a lightly floured bread board. With a rolling pin, shape it into a 1/3”-thick oval.

Simply Delicious!
Photo by: Lord-Willams
Assemble the pies:
10.  Place 1 tbsp of meat mixture onto a piece of dough. Fold and pinch the fold to seal the pie.

Fry the pies[6]
11.  Heat 2 tbsp olive oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Place the pies in the hot oil and gently fry, turning them once or twice until golden brown on both sides, about 6 minutes.[7] You may have to do this in batches, adding more oil as needed.
12.  Remove and drain on paper towels.

Serve:
13.  Serve hot or cold. Drizzle warmed honey over the top of the pies. 



[1] During Soto’s posthumous trail it was revealed that this recipe was one of his family’s favorite Sabbath day dishes.
[2] A Christian could have used pork.
[3] Gitlitz points out that mixing meat with milk, or in this case cheese, was prohibited by Jewish law but Hispanic Jews did not seem to follow this rule.
[4] A Christian would have used lard.
[5] The steps in making this dish may seem cumbersome, but the actual preparation time is not long.
[6] These meat pies are best eaten hot. If you wish to prepare them ahead of time for serving at a later date, we suggest that you halt the preparation after you have formed the meat pies, but before you actually fry them. They are also good cold.
[7] This method and deep frying were tried. Both made for excellent empanadas/turnovers. The latter method resulted in crispier dough.

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

CERDO IBÉRICO WITH RECIPE FOR MUSHROOMS STUFFED WITH IBERIAN HAM


Iberian Pig from Cork Oak Forests of Huelva, Spain
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Iberian pig, a cross between Scrofa fermus and Sus mediterraneus. This is a bred producing a fat accumulation that predominates during muscular formation, as a result of the infiltration of libidos from hydrocarbonic nutrition obtained from cork oak acorns. The Archipriest of Hita indicates that fresh pork legs and whole hams were consumed by nobility and classes of society owning pigs. Castro traces salted hams back to the Roman period. See alcornoque. [Castañer. 1998:15; Castro. Alimentación. 199:148; Pers. Memories. Slaughters Mostoles. 2000-2001:2003; Ruíz/Brey. 1965:1084c:176; Serradilla. 1993:44; and Villena/Calero. 2002:22b]

MUSHROOMS STUFFED WITH IBERIAN HAM RECIPE FROM THE
PERSONAL ARCHIVES OF THE SPANISH MEDIEVAL CHEF

Hollowing out Mushroom Caps
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

2 slices of thick Serrano ham diced
1 tbsp virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove mashed
2 tbsp chopped parsley
½ c grated cheese
8 large mushroom caps about 2-2 ½" in diameter[1]

Garnish:
1-2 thin slices of Iberian ham rolled and cut into rings
1 sprig of parsley

Preparation

Thoroughly wash mushrooms. Remove stems from caps and hollow out the caps.

If Human Mice are Present, Double the Recipe
They are that good!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
PREHEAT OVEN TO 400º F/200º C

Chop the stems and flesh from emptying the caps from two of the mushrooms and chop it. Set the rest aside.[2]

Mix the stems and flesh from the 2 mushrooms with the remaining ingredients. Stuff the caps with this mixture. Place them on a greased baking tray and cook 15-20 minutes.

Garnish each cap with a ring of Iberian ham and a parsley leaf.



[1] If serving as an entrée or to accompany the main course. If serving as hors d'oeuvre use smaller caps
[2] A possible use for left over mushroom stems and flesh is to chop and mixed them with a mashed garlic clove and fry them in olive oil with a teaspoon of parsley. This can be added to an omelet or simply used as garnish for another meal.