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Wednesday, January 9, 2013

CHURRA WITH A 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR JANET OF MUTTON


Jarrod with Friend
Photo from: lamb lady

P. surro, Eng. 1. bastard. 2. churro. This is an ancient Iberian breed of sheep brought by the Celts. Actually, churra is an adjective meaning farm, farming or work as in farmhouse or workhorse. The sheep also have been called burda (coarse, ordinary) and basta (coarse) for their long, coarse wool, riberiega (riverside) as they are found north of the Duero River and raza castellana (Castellan breed). It roams around Castile and León, principally the regions of Tierra de Campos (León) and Cerrato de Palencia (Palencia). The quality of their wool is not inferior to that of a merino. It is not as long. The churro is known for having its head and hooves covered with a thick coat of rigid hair Although secondary to the merino, it is an older breed and valued for its stamina and flexibility. These tireless roamers, also, are known for their lively temperament and persistence in seeking food in unfavorable conditions. Their surroundings of natural herbs and a microclimate produce the spirit and character of the stock. This bred is the most longevous, the most prolific and the carrier of the least number on congenital illnesses. Further, it is the mother of the best quality of lamb’s meat. Sucking lamb is traditionally roasted for Easter in León but weened lambs are juicier. The churro was the first breed of domesticated sheep taken to the New World and became a major livelihood for the Navajo Indians. There the ending of the churra was corrupted to end in “o” instead of “a”. Spaniards ask if it was because the Indians ate them for breakfast instead of churros. 3. calf or heifer. [ES: Raza.” Nov 13, 00; and Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:153-154]

A POTTAGE CALLED JANETE OF MUTTON ADAPTED FROM NOLA xvii-1 
POTAJE DE CARNERO ADOBADO QUE SE DICE JANETE DE CARNERO

Frying Ingredients
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients


1 k/ 2 lbs breast and neck of lamb[1]
1 ½ onions
3 small pears
1 quince
1 tbsp sugar
125 gr salt pork (tocino)
1 tbsp virgin olive oil
63 g sheep’s liver
25 gr almonds
1 slice of toasted bread
1/3  c  vinegar
1 garlic clove
1 tbsp honey
½ white pepper
½ tsp rosemary
½ tsp freshly scraped ginger
salt to taste

Garnish:
1 tbsp chopped parsley


Preparation

An Excellent Dish for Sweet and Sour Lovers
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Cut the meat into pieces the size of a walnut and boil it until for 10 minutes. Then remove from heat and drain off water. Put sliced onion into a pan and boil. In another pan boil pears and the quince, quartered cored, with the sugar.

Dice the salt pork, without skin, put it in a pan with 1 tbsp olive oil. Fry the salt pork; when half done remove it from the pan and add it to the lamb. Chio the liver and add it to the pan. Cook until rare and set aside. Slice the onions and brown them in the pan. Once fried, remove from them pan and drain off all the fat and oil possible. Put the onions in a pot with the meat and diced salt pork. Cover this with broth from the meat and water from the pears and quinces and boil gently.

Grind almonds in a mortar with the liver and bread soaked in vinegar with a garlic clove. Add a little broth and honey. Add this mixture to the meat mixture. Boil gently. Five minutes before finished, add the spices.

Serve in soup bowls and garnish with parsley.


[1] As this is confusing and costly as it is mostly bones, a small leg of lamb was used.




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