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Friday, June 21, 2013

CONFECTURA WITH 13TH CENTURY PEANUT BRITTLE RECIPE BEFORE PEANUTS

Boiling Honey
Photo by: Lord-Williams
confite, L.conficio (blending), Sp Heb marmalata, marmeláda, Ar. murabba. Eng confection. Literallyin Arabic means confection but it is marmalade. The word mermelada was not adopted from the English to the Spaniards until a later date. Then it was to distinguish medicine from “a product pleasing the sweet tooth.” confections were made by blending sugar with another ingredient.

During the Middle Ages in Iberia it consisted of sugar or honey coated sweetmeats such as almonds, pine kernels, hazelnuts or other seed or fruit mixed in or covered with sugar. In the 14th C Juan I of Aragon ordered this from a candy maker in Barcelona. He refused unless paid in advance. The queen then wrote that she would guarantee payment as soon as the order reached Aragon. [Aguilera. 2002:95; Covarrubias. 349:a:12; Gitlitz. 1999:253; and Martínez Llopis. Historia. 1981:158; Sas.1986: 183;Villena/Calero. 2002:150]



Nut Brittle Cooling Off
Photo by: Lord-Williams
PEANUT BRITTLE BEFORE PEANUTS[1] ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ #61 NOUS CONFITES pp 227-228

Ingredients

1/3 c pine nuts
1/3 c walnuts
1/3 c pistachios
1/4tsp ginger 1/2 tsp ground cloves 1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp black pepper oil to grease pan
2 cups honey

Preparation

An After Dinner Treat
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Place nuts on cookie sheet and roast 10 minutes.

REDUCE OVEN TO 300º F/150º C

When roasted pour them into a bowl and add the spices.

Place parchment paper or aluminum foil on baking pan (7.5x11x3/4”) and grease it with oil.

Put the honey in a heavy pan with a candy thermometer ¼” above the bottom of the pan. Heat the honey. When it begins to boil stir constantly until it reaches 240º F/115º C. Remove from heat and add nuts and spices. Mix well and pour the mixture on the cookie sheet.

Let cool overnight.  Break into pieces and serve.



[1] Peanuts were unknown in Europe until the discovery of the American continents. Still peanuts were feed for livestock until the beginning of the 20th century.

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