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Monday, July 1, 2013

CONFITURA WITH A 13TH C RECIPE FOR A MINT ELECTUARY TO CURE ILLS


An Electuary To Be Licked
Photo by: Lord-Williams
ME co(u)nfyt(e), comfit, comfitures, electuaries, sweets, a preserve, sugar syrup, candied fruit or sugar coating. Avenzoar names some 19.made with garlic, pepper, apples, quince, grapes, anise, roses, violets, mints, and/or gums etc. all of which were beneficial medically. [Curye. 1985:180; Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:77:110-116; and Pacho. 1994:150]


A MINT ELECTUARY (JUWÂRISH[1]) ADAPTED FROM HUICI'S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #531 ŶUWĀRIŠ DE MENTA, p 287


  
Mint
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

1 candy thermometer
popsicle sticks

5 oz mint
2 c sugar
¼ oz of mastic[2]

Preparation

Line a pan (7.5x11x3/4”)
with foil or parchment paper. Grease with oil and set aside.

Wash mint several times. Separate leaves from stems. Put leaves in a food processor with enough water to make 2 cups mint juice.  Grind it well and strain leaving the juice. Discard the ground leaves. 

Place the sugar in a heavy pot. Add mint water and mastic. Bring to a boil. Continue boiling to around 240º F/115 ºC.

Boiling the Mixture
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Pour into the pan and let cool. When cool. Insert popsicle sticks and twirl the paste around. Lick the mint sweet on the sticks.

Its benefits: it cuts phlegmatic vomiting, increases the appetite, warms the stomach, and if taken before eating, constipates the intestines and is useful.


[1] Perry explains this is a medicine to be licked.
[2] Gum arabic, procured in the Spanish pharmacy, was used as mastic seems to be only available at the hardware store and it is not known if it is eatable.

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