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Monday, July 15, 2013

COPA WITH 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR LEMON SYRUP TO QUENCH THE THIRST


Water Goblet
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Cat. gresal, OCast grïal, Eng. grail, cup or goblet shaped glass, with a stem and a base, like that from which Jesus supposedly drank during the Last Supper. It was used ordinarily for drinking any type of liquid in the Middle Ages. The quality of those of nobility depended on the status of the owner. They could be crystal, gold or silver, but normally they were wooden or pewter.

Andalusia had a glass factory in the 9th century, thanks to Ziryab, the musician in the court in Cordoba who recommended crystal goblets over metal ones in an era when wine was permitted in the Muslim court.  There were transparent goblets and tinted ones.

Nola instructs that to fill a water goblet, the steward must be hold in the right hand, higher than the nose. That way, if the steward sneezes, the mucus will not fall into the goblet. Then the steward pours water into the goblet from the pitcher with the left hand. See gresal. [Greus. 1987:60:140-141:255 etc; Lord. Cocina. 2006; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:33 ftn 56:42; Nola/Pérez. 1994:56:65; and Ruíz/Saínz. 1986:203:1175b]

LEMON  SYRUP, ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #512. JARABE DE LIMÓN, p 279

Lemon Syrup
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

8 lemons (2 c /16 oz.)
1 lb sugar

Preparation

Make 16 oz fresh lemon juice. Add the same amount of sugar. Boil 3-5 minutes until becomes syrup. Its advantages are that it extracts heat from bile; it quenches thirst and binds the bowels.



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