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Monday, August 5, 2013

CORPANZO (Cat or It?), WITH 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR PARDING PEACOCKS OR CAPONS


A Slab of Bacon Sliced Opened to Bard Chicken
in One Whole Piece!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Cast corpanchón), Eng the fowl’s body, as a chicken, striped of breast and legs. [Nola. 1982:xxiiii-1; Nola/Iranzo. 1982:168; and Nola/Pérez.1994:192]

BARDING PEACOCKS OR CAPONS ADAPTED FROM

NOLA xxiiii-1 EMBORROZAMIENTO DE PAVOS O CAPONES[1]
 For 4 persons 

Ingredients

Roasted Chicken Wrapped in Slab of Bacon
Ready to Carve
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 peacock or capon
1 slab of bacon
pins and/or skewers
parchment paper

For the gravy:

1 tbsp flour
1 tsp thyme



Preparation

Place peacock or capon on a spit and half roast it during ½ hour. Remove the spit and wrap the bird’s breast with slices of bacon[2], which is as wide as the breast and secure them with pins and/or skewers to prevent the bacon from falling off. Place the head with the beak[3] stretched of lengthwise inside the carcass without the breast or legs.[4] Cover the bird with parchment paper pinned down on the bacon. Finish roasting the body on a spit or in a pan.
Wrap the appendages in a wet rag and roast them in a pan until done.
When the carcass is done, let sit 15-20 minutes. Remove the grease and broth to make the gravy. Carve the carcass lengthwise and serve immediately.

[1] See blog titled Ave María, published December 26, 2011 for a different version of this recipe.
[2] The Medieval Spanish Chef’s butcher kindly sliced open a whole slap of bacon, as seen in the first photo, leaving it in one piece to wrap around the chicken. This is a time saver as it only has to be secured at  the two ends where a package of sliced bacon takes forever to pin down.
[3] The Medieval Spanish Cook has something against working with dead animal heads; further the poulterer does not sell them. A head, therefore, was not used. 
[4] This is contradictory. The Dictionary of the Royal Academy clearly states that corpanchón means without breast and appendages. The recipe, however, indicates that the bacon should be wrapped in around the body without the breast and appendages. Further, the recipe instructs that the head is to be placed inside the carcass. This is a little hard to do without the breast;  therefore, the breast was left in tact but the appendages (legs and wings) were removed. 




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