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Wednesday, November 6, 2013

CUESCO WITH RECIPE FOR PIT SYRUP

Separating the Pits from the Flesh
Photo by: Lord-Williams
pit, as in a date, peach, apricot, nectarine, plum, cherry, olive etc. Peach pit oil is extracted from the pit in the same manner as almonds. It is a good softener. Avenzoar recommended ground peach pits to be used as a cleaner and to beautify the face and peach pit oil dropped into the ear to sooth and evacuate it and to diminish deafness. The pits were thought to be toxic. In Spain, therefore, they were totally ground to prevent poisoning. Since, it has been found that pits are not poisonous Peach pit flour was used to make bread during wheat famines. Around 1400, cherry pits were added to wine and drunk to purge the kidneys, destroy kidney stones and intestinal worms.  [Ares. “Comidas.” 1994:131; Benavides-Barajas. Alhambra. 1999:120; Castro. Alimentación. 1996:300; Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:75:119; Nola/Iranzo.1982:168; and Nola/Pérez. 1994:193; and Villena/Calero. 2002:63a]

Plainly Delicious!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
PIT SYRUP FROM THE ARCHIVES OF THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF

Ingredients 

1 c pits
2 c juice from the fruit and/or water
2 c sugar
1 splash of brandy

Preparation


Remove the flesh from the pits and save the juice. Grind pits, in a food processor, into small pieces. Place them in a saucepan with the juice and sugar. Bring this to a boil. Let cool and refrigerate overnight. Strain before serving and add a splash of brandy. It can be used in cocktails or in compotes or it can be used as a sauce for a fruit pie. It can be kept in the refrigerator up to three weeks.

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