Entradas populares

Friday, August 30, 2013

COTIDIANA WITH A BOILED DISH FOR SLAVES


Choppjng Intestines
Photo by: Lord-Williams
daily, everyday. [Berceo. Libro. 1983:272:2565]  

A BOILED DISH FOR SLAVES ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #293. HECHURA DEL HERVIDO DE LOS ESCLAVOS, p 166

Ingredients

½ lb left over meat[1]
1 intestine (not pork) and tripe[2]
1 onion
1 fennel bulb
1 c rue[3]
1 citron leaf[4]
1 tsp coriander ground
1/8 tsp salt
1 tbsp oil
1 head of garlic
½ tsp pepper

To make soppes:
2 slices of old bread
1/3 c vinegar

Soppes for Slaves
Photo by: Lord-Willliams
Preparation

Dice the meat, wash it and but it in a pot. Wash the intestine and tripe well inside and out.  Cut it into round slices.  Add it to the pot with one onion, fennel, rue, citron leaf, coriander, salt and olive oil. Pour enough water into the pot to cover the meat. Bring it to a boil and then simmer boiling gently for one hour or until meat falls apart.

Peel the head of garlic and add it to the pot with pepper. Bring to a boil once more and turn off the heat.  Leave the pot on the burner and let the food settle for one hour.

The recipe does not specifically state that this is a soppes but it is logical. To prepare soppes add bread soaked in vinegar and heat until the sauce thickens. 


[1] It seems very unusual that slaves received meat but then restrictions on classes who could eat meat did not seem to be as tight in Iberia as in England. The meat of course would come the worst parts of the animal. This could be a dish for slaves, commoners and or peasants.
[2] Only pork intestines and tripe were for sale at the time of preparing this recipe. They were used as there was not other alternative.
[3] Celery leaves were used as a substitute.
[4] A lemon or orange leaf may be used.

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

COSTRADA WITH CANDIED CITRON SEE CAKE


Mixing the Ingredients
Photo by: Lord-Williams
candied citron seed cake. See cidrada and cidrero. Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:248]

CANDIED CITRON SEED CAKE ADAPTED BY THE SPANISH MEDIEVAL CHEF
for 6-8 people

Ingredients

3 eggs
½ c granulated sugar
½ c brown sugar
1½ tbsp heavy cream
1 orange for zest and juice
1½ tbsp orange blossom water
1/3 cup ground almonds
1 cup flour
2 tbsp poppy seeds
1 tsp baking powder
½ tsp baking soda

Garnish: 2 c natural yogurt
1 c fresh sliced strawberries
2 tbsp powdered sugar
A Totally Unique and Yummy Cake 
for All Occasions, Dessert, Tea Time or a Snack
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Preparation

PREHEAT OVEN TO 375º F / 180º C

Mix eggs and sugars. Add heavy cream and oil. Mix well. Add orange juice, orange zest and orange blossom water. Add ground almonds, flour and poppy seeds. Mix well. Add baking soda and baking powder. Mix again.

Pour into two 9” cake pans, greased and sprinkled with flour. Cover with aluminum foil. Bake for about 40 minutes. Remove foil the last 10 minutes. Let cool 10 minutes and remove from pans.

Sprinkle with powdered sugar and place yogurt and fresh strawberries (also sprinkled with powdered sugar) on the side.



Monday, August 26, 2013

COSTILLAS DE CERDO WITH RECIPE FOR SPARE RIBS




Spare Ribs for Sale, Mercado de las Maravillas, Madrid
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ribs Separated Ready for Cooking
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCast conchas, Eng. pork spareribs. In León spareribs are soaked and put in the pot with vegetables. After the acceptance of rice during the Middle Ages, those living in Leonese mountains gradually began preparing spareribs with it but even today the addition of rice is a surprise, not a custom. In Vera, Estremadura spareribs are marinated for about eight days and then fried or roasted. In Madrid they are simply cut into small pieces and grilled over a wood fire. [Pers. Memories. Slaughters Mostoles. 2000-2001:2003; Serradilla. 1993:90; and Villena/Calero. 2002:29b]


SPARE RIBS – this recipe is repeated from Cochina wih Spare Ribs
published March 11, 2013 because there is just no better way to eat them!

Ingredients

1 lb spare ribs
2 tbsp lard
salt and white pepper to taste

Eating Spare Ribs the Medieval Way
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Cut the spare ribs. 

The ribs are best barbecued and served as hors d'oeuvres. Neither salt nor sauce is necessary. If a barbecue is not available they can be broiled or pan fried as follows:

Heat a frying pan and add the lard. Fry the ribs until browned. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve warm.

Eat the medieval way picking up a rib between the thumb and the index finger of the right hand. Wear rings with stones on the ring finger and baby finger. The stones are to ward off poisons and evil spirits. If any grease falls on the stones, they will loose their power and the eater will be considered a cochina or cochino (a greasy mess)!





Friday, August 23, 2013

CORZO, -A WITH 14TH CENTRY RECIPE FOR DEER AND OTHER LARGE GAME


Corzo
Photo from: jorgeaq
OCast corço, L. Cervus capreolus, Eng roe deer. It is a little bigger than a goat, more delicate than fallow deer and rarely was seen in Al-Andalus. It is about 75 cm. high and 1.25 m. long. The ears are a little longer than half of its fine, short head. It has big eyes. The roebuck has short straight round horns with three branches, while the roe doe has none. Its coat is reddish brown in summer and grayish brown in winter. The fur around the stomach is lighter and the insides of its hooves as well. The tip of its nose and each side of its upper lip are circled in black and lower lip has a white spot.

Although imported into Andalusia, in the remainder of Spain there are numerous medieval recipes for roasting the meat in vinegar sauce with currants, in wine sauce and broth, or roe blood, vinegar and broth with aromatic herbs. It could be served with hard boiled eggs, fried bread or pureed chestnuts.

In León, however, roe deer meat does not seem to have been as appreciated as much as in Andalusia. In the former area, they were tramped or killed for their skins. Two exceptions, however, are roe deer chorizo and roe deer jerky made in the Maragato Region, which still are thought exquisite.

Villena explains that roe meat should be carved in the same way as beef or ox meat. Avenzoar states that it was similar to the fallow deer but the meat was much more delicate.  See buey and vaca. [Ares. “Comidas.” 1994:101; Benavides-Barajas. Nueva-Clásica. 1995:220; Espasa. 1988:15:CONST:1093-1095; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:139; Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:58; Trapiello. 1994:138; and Villena.. 2002:31a:33a]


A BITTER-SWEET SAUCE FOR STAG, BOAR, BEARS, ROE DEA OR ALL LARGE GAME ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ #LXXXX QUI PARLA CON SE FFA SALSA A SERVO HO PORC SENGLAR HO A HORS HO CABRIOL HO TOTA BÈSTIA SALVATGE p. 123

Gently Boiling Meat in Wine
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

1 ½ lbs roe deer[1]
2 c water
l ½ c red wine
2 slices of toast
1/3 c vinegar
¼ c honey
½ c currants[2]
1 tsp freshly ground white pepper
1 scraping of ginger

Preparation

Dice the meat. Put it in a heavy pot with water and wine. Bring to a boil and simmer for an hour or ½ hour if using a pressure cooker.

A Meat to Really Does Melt Your Mouth
With a Delicious Sauce!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Remove the crusts from the bread. Soak them in vinegar and grind them in a mortar. Add them to the pot with the broth and meat. Add honey. Taste for sweet and sour flavor. Adjust if necessary. Add raisins and spices. Simmer uncovered for about 45 minutes to thicken the sauce and reduce the volume to half.

Separate the meat and sauce. Place the sauce on the table in bowls for diners to dip the meat into the sauce.



[1] Beef was used as deer was not available Turing the time of year the recipe was prepared.
[2] If currants are desired, ½-1 c of seedless currants should be added about 10 minutes prior to the end of cooking time but Sent Soví does not call for them. If currants are not in season add raisins.

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

CORVINA WITH A 14TH CENTURY COMMON PEPPER SWEET AND SOUR SAUCE RECIPE

Fresh Corvina from the Fishmonger
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Cat reig, OCat reche, reyg, L. Argyrosomus regius,  Eng. maigre, meager. It is also called a croaker for the noise it makes when savaging for food. It is a big European fish with skin like the sturgeon and the brown maigre. The English name is derived from meager day or fast day when it was prohibited to eat meat.

Although Vilanova advised against eating them for their large size and tough skin, they are valued food and cooked like chicken. They can weigh up to 48 k (100 lbs) and grow to 1.9 m long but they usually weigh 15-35 lbs. An excellent catch weighs some 60 lbs and is about 5’ long. Although there are some 160 species, in general, they have a large salmon-colored mouth and pearly-silver body. Every fourth scale is at a different angle.

Large schools live in the Atlantic in warmer water south of England and in the Mediterranean especially off the African coast where they were abundant during 15-16 C. Andalusians have fished for them in the Straits of Gibraltar and on the Atlantic for time immemorial. Although far away, the sailors also fished for maigers with nets in the waters of Sidi Ifni, at the mouth of Lac d’Ifni and the banks of Bojador Cape in Africa.

They live between 30-40 meters below sea level near the coasts. Maigres eat gray mullets, sardines and shoaling estuarine fish. They have sharp teeth extending down both sides of the throat. With the muscles next to the swim bladder, they make a noise like a drum and can be heard up to 30 meters away. They are heard particularly when spawning.

Vilanova advised that it should be hung to tenderize it. Villena prescribed carving the meat lengthwise like sturgeon, except that the meager does not have cartilage. See corvallo, esturión and . [Corbera. 1979:166; ES: Horton. Nov 26, 03; and Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:235 and and Villena/Calero. 2002:38a]


MAIGRE WITH A COMMON SWEET AND SOUR PEPPER SAUCE ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ CCXV QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FREE PEBRADA COMUNA, p 213



Maigre with Sweet and Sour Pepper Sauce
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients


1 lb maigre
1 tbsp olive oil

For the sauce:
0.8 oz black peppercorns
1 oz gr toasted almonds
1 c broth
2 slices of bread
1/3 c  vinegar
½ c honey or sugar
½ tsp cinnamon
1 pinch ground cloves
1 pinch cardamon

Preparation

PREHEAT OVEN TO 375º F /190º C

Gut the maigre but leave the scales and skin. Grease an ovenproof baking dish with 1 tbsp olive oil. Bake the maigre in the oven for about 25 minutes or until done. Peel back the skin, open it and remove bones from the backbone and top side.

For the sauce:

Grind the pepper in a mortar. Add almonds and continue to grind. Soak bread in vinegar and add it to the mortar. Mash well. If thick add a little broth. Strain through a cheese cloth into a saucepan.

Heat the saucepan. Add honey and bring to a boil. Taste for sweet and sour flavor. Add more honey or sugar or vinegar if necessary. When well mixed add spices.

Serve warm with the fish.



Monday, August 19, 2013

CORVILLO WITH STEWED PEARS RECIPE FOR THE SICK AND THE REST OF US!

Peeling Pears with a "Corvillo"
Photo by: Lord-Williams
curved paring knife. The name is derived from encorbato or miércoles corvillo (to bow the head and incline the body, as done on Ash Wednesday). It is thought that it could have been invented in Zaragoza during the 14th C. [Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:33:ftn 54]

STEWED PEARS FOR SICK PATIENTS ADAPTED FROM NOLA liii-3 MIRRAUSTE DE PERAS Y PUEDESE DAR A ENFERMOS

Ingredients

1 lb pears
And so the Sauce Thickens
Photo by: Lord-Williams
3-4 c meat broth
½ c peeled and toasted almonds
2 tbsp rice
½ c sugar
1 cinnamon stick
1/8 c rosewater

Garnish:
Splinters from the cinnamon stick
Sugar

Preparation

Peel pears, quarter them and remove the seeds and core. Stew them in broth, 5-10 minutes after the broth boils. When soft, remove the pears from the both.

Stewed Pears, Dish Savored by Kings!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Grind the almonds in a food processor. Add the broth and blend well. Strain this through a cheese cloth into a heavy pot.

Grind rice in a food processor to make flour. Slowly mix this in with a little broth until all is dissolved. Pour it into the pot of almond milk. Add sugar and cinnamon and simmer[1] until the sauce thickens.

Add rosewater to the sauce and stir well. Add the pears. Serve the dessert in bowls. Garnish with cinnamon splinters and sugar sprinkled on top.


A NOTE FROM NOLA: Should the pear sauce scorch, place yeast in a linen rag and put this in the pot with the sauce. Bring to a boil and the odor and scorching will be eliminated. This can be done with all sauces and pottages.




[1] The recipe instructs to simmer for 1 hour. As the size of the recipe has been reduced to 4 persons, 15 minutes is sufficient time for the sauce to thicken.

Friday, August 16, 2013

CORVALLO WITH STUFFED MAIGRE RECIPE


Photo from: Gorrioni
Cat corball, OCat corballa, L. Sciaena umbra, Eng. brown maigre or meagre. It is a stout, oval saltwater fish living in the Mediterranean and the Atlantic Ocean from the English Channel to Senegal. It is normally about 35 to 45 cm long but can grow up to 70-75 cm and weigh 4 k. It has a round snout and a very big, low, horizontal month. The body and neck are covered with small, jelly-like dark bronze scales with metallic reflections. The head is black with lilac reflections making it look like velvet. Vilanova advised against eating this fish for its tough skin. See corvina. [Corbera. 1998:167-168; and Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:235]

STUFFED MAIGRE FROM THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF’S RECIPES
Para 4 personas

Ingredients

The Stuffing
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 brown maigre about 3lbs.

For the Stuffing:
1 onion
3 ½ oz mushrooms
3 muscles
4 large shrimp
2 hardboiled eggs
1 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp butter
½ c white wine or sherry
¼  c breadcrumbs
Salt to taste.


For the broth:
4 glasses of fish broth
fish heads and bones
1 onion chopped
1 leek 1 celery stalk


Preparation

Corvallo with Stuffing
Photo by: Lord-Williams
For the stuffing:

Heat a frying pan. Add olive oil and fry the onion until translucent. Add the mushrooms. Steam muscles and shrimp. When done cut in small pieces. Add them to the mushrooms and onions with chopped hardboiled eggs and breadcrumbs. Mix well. Add salt to taste.

Preheat oven to 340º F/170º C

Gut and clean the meager and salt it. Fill it with the stuffing. Place it in an ovenproof dish that has been greased with olive oil and butter. Grind the ingredients from the broth in a food processor return them to the broth and strain.  Pour the broth over the fish. Cook in the oven for about 40 minutes or until done.

Remove the stuffing from the fish. Reserving the broth. Gently remove the skin and scales on the topside peeling it back with finger nails. Then meat for the top side, removing bones on the top side. Remove the backbone and any other bones. Gently flip the underside over and remove the skin and scales.

Serve warm with stuffing.

The broth can be used in fish soppes or in sauces.






Wednesday, August 14, 2013

CORTAR LAS MONTAÑAS


FIREWOOD DELIVERY
Photo from: B. Polon


literally "to chop the mountains;" to chop firewood for winter. [Ruíz/Saínz. 1986:216:1273b]  





Monday, August 12, 2013

CORTAR DE LUENGO WITH STUFFED CHICKEN


This Stuffing Makes the Meat Juicy
Photo by: Lord-Williams
to cut lengthwise as in carving chicken beasts. [Nola/Pérez.1994:192]

THE MEDIEVAL CHEF’S CHICKEN WITH APPLE STUFFING
For 4 persons

Ingredients

1 chicken
1 apple
1 egg
½ onion
1 stalk celery
1/3 c walnuts
1 c day old bread diced
1 sprig thyme
1 tsp almori
1 tbsp fresh parsley chopped
salt and pepper to taste
2 tbsp lard

Preparation

Chicken Breasts are a Pleasure to Carve Lengthwise
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Clean and scorch the chicken. Wash the cavity well and eliminate fat deposits.

Peel the apple and chop it. Beat an egg and mix it with the apple. Peel an onion and chop it. Add it to the apples. Coarsely chop walnuts and bread add these with thyme, murri, parlsey and salt and pepper and 1 tbsp lard cut into small pieces. Mix well so that all the ingredients are coated with egg.  Fill the  bird’s cavity between the two legs and that in the neck with the stuffing. Sew both cavities tight. Rub the outside of the chicken with lard and cover with a damp cloth or today, aluminum foil.

PREHEAT OVEN TO 375ºF/190ºC

Cook the chicken for 45 minutes. Remove the cloth or open the aluminum foil and continue cooking until brown.

Remove from oven and let sit 10-15 minutes. Carve he chicken as per Enrique Villena’s instructions: removing the wings, legs and thighs and slice the breast lengthwise. Place on a platter with the stuffing on one side.[1]





[1]Villena/Calero. 2002






Friday, August 9, 2013

CORTAR WITH 3TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR ROAST HARE


Beside the Carving Knife, the Trident
was Commonin Medieval Times
Photo by: Lord-Williams
to cut, carve. See Enrique de Villena’s El Arte Cisoria (The Art of Carving).

ROAST HARE ADAPTED FROM HUCI’S TRANSLATION OF
ANON AL-.ANDALUS #30 RECETA DE LIEBRE ASADA, p 30

Ingredients

1 hare
salt to taste
1 tbsp butter

For the sauce:
1 tsp murri
1 tsp freshly grated ginger
1 tsp thyme
1 tsp cumin
½ c virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove[1]

Or:
½ c sweet almond oil

Preparation

Skin and clean the hare. Discard entrails except heart and liver. Save them for broth or sauce.

Fill a heavy pot half full of water. Add salt and bring to a boil. Add hare and reduce heat to gently boil 45 minutes. Then strain discarding the water.

PREHEAT OVEN TO 375ºF/190ºC

Place the rabbit on a spit and roast over moderate heat 15 minutes. Then grease it with butter. Return to oven and roast ½ hour or until done.


The Sauce and the Almond Oil were Tried
Both are Equally Delicious
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Carve the rabbit according to Villena’s instructions: remove the back first, deboning it. Then slice the thick part of the leg in large pieces. Do the same with the other legs. Cut the head and neck into two parts. Cut the head in half and hit it with the back part of it with a second knife. Then cut the loin into four parts, slicing the thick part of the loin into thick slices.  Place all the meat on a platter and pour sauce over it just before serving.[2]

For the vinaigrette:

Mix murri, ginger, thyme, cumin, oil and mashed garlic in a saucepan.  Bring to a boil and pour over the carved rabbit or sprinkle the meat with sweet almond oil.  A sauce or the oil is essential as the meat is dry.



[1] It is interesting to note that garlic came back into Spanish cuisine (the Romans used it) with the disappearance of murri , garum and liquidum but as this recipe is dated at the time of the transition from garum to garlic both ingredients are used.
[2] Villena/Calero. 2002:36b-37a