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Wednesday, October 30, 2013

CUERNOS DE GACELA WITH RECIPE FOR HALF MOON SWEET ROLLS

Gazelle Horns
Photo by: Lord-Williams
medias lunas, tobillos, ka’b, “gazelle horns,” buns made in the shape or “half moons,” crescent shaped 13th C roll, “knee shaped,” or “ka’b,” in the shape of an extended circle, without a crown. These were the forerunners of croissants, which originated from Andalusia. 

By the 15th C the croissants known today were being made in Christian Spain. The Turks introduced them to Vienna in the 17h C. or visa versa. Who introduced them to Austria is disputed. Some say that they came with Ferdinand I of Habsburg, brother of Charles V of Habsburg who was Charles I of Spain and that when the Turks invaded, to belittle them, Austrians presented them with the bun in the shape of a half moon to eat. Others maintain that it was the other way around to show their domination, the Turks presented the half moon breakfast bun to the Viennese. 

Actually, bakers in Budapest, who rising early, prepared the buns in the shape of crescents to warn inhabitants of the Turkish invasion. For this the attempt failed and the croissant became a symbol of victory for the Budapestians. 

Cutting Dough into Squares, then Triangles and Rolling It
Photo by: Lord-Wiliams
It was not until the 18th C that Marie Antoinette, wife of Luis XVI, is said to have introduced it to France. In the 8th C. the ingredients included a little oil, warm water, salt, ginger, anise or fennel and if desired sugar, some almonds and rose water. After baking, sometimes they were topped with pine kernels or caraway seeds. By the 15th C. cold butter was included and the secret of success was the dough, which had to sit in a cold spot before baking. See "Pan Varios." [Benavides-Barajas. Nueva-Clásica. 1995:39-40:263; and Misc. Conversations with José María Lancho. Mar 7, 03]


HALF MOON SWEET ROLLS1

Half Moon Sweet Roll
Photoby: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

230 grs or 1 ½ c flour
115 grs or ¾ c butter
60 gr or 1/3 c sugar
3 egg yolks
cinnamon2

plus sugar and 1 egg beaten

Preparation

PREHEAT OVEN TO 400º F/ 200º C

Mix all the above ingredients together till it becomes a smooth dough. Then roll it out and cut it into squares they cut the squares diagonally into triangles. Roll the triangles beginning and the longest base. Curl the ends to make half moons and trim the edges with a knife. Brush each roll with a beaten egg and sprinkle with sifted sugar. Bake about 20 minutes depending upon the size.




1 Recipe is adapted the American-Spanish Cook Book, Cocina Hispano Americana, #346, pg 299, Edición a Beneficio del Hospital Anglo-Americano de Madrid, Ediciones Garriga, S.A., Madrid, 1959.
2 Probably a pinch cinnamon is mixed with powdered sugar sprinkled over the tops of each roll.

Monday, October 28, 2013

CUENCO WITH 13TH CENTURY EGGPLANT PATTY RECIPE

A Typical Spanish Earthenware Bowl Sold in Common Market Places 
Photo by: Lord-Williams

OLeon conga, Eng bowl normally it was earthenware but could be wooden or tin. They were on sale at the Leon market in the 10th C. [Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:47:ftn 64]


EGGPLANT PATTIES ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF AL-ANDALUS #345 ISFIRIYĀ[1] DE BERENJENAS, p 190
for 6 persons

Ingredients

2 eggplants 
1 c breadcrumbs
3 eggs beaten
2 garlic cloves mashed
Seasoning: ½ tsp pepper, 1 tbsp chopped cilantro leaves, 1 tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp murri[2] and salt to taste

Dip:
2 eggs beaten
1 c breadcrumbs

oil for frying

Garnish
½ c whipped cream (optional)

Preparation
Eggplant Balls in a Modern "Cuenco"
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Peel the eggplants and cut into pieces. Put them into boiling water for 10-15 minutes with salt until soft. 

Remove from the water and drain on paper towels to remove the liquid. Mash them and put them in a bowl with breadcrumbs, the seasoning and eggs. Refrigerate for a few hours. 

Make cakes, balls or croquettes with this. Dip them in eggs and then roll them in the breadcrumbs.  Fry in olive oil.

Place 1 tbsp of whipped cream on top if desired. Serve warm or cold in a bowl.



[1] Patties that are round, oval with tapered ends of shaped like croquettes. They can be steamed, boiled or fried.  
[2] See blog “almorí” posted August 25, 2011 for recipe.

Friday, October 25, 2013

CUELLO WITH INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING PEACOCKS, PHEASANTS AND OTHER FOWL

garganta, OCat col, Cat coll, Eng neck. [Anón/Grewe. 1982:I:62-63:ftn 5]

Peacock
Photo by: Peter Pearson
SEASONING FOR PEACOCKS AND PHEASANTS FROM SENT SOVÍ CH I. CÓMO SE DEBEN CONDIMENTAR LOS PAVONES (O PAVOS REALES) Y LOS FAISANES, pp 62-63

THE ORIGINAL RECIPE

Peacocks and pheasants are seasoned as follows. If desired capons may be seasoned in the same manner, with the head, or with the neck or with the tail. Bleed the peacocks, pheasants or capons from vein in the mouth instead of the ear. Do this at sunset. Later, pluck all, except the tail, head and neck. Wash them. Before roasting, tie the claws. Wrap the tail, and then the head and neck in a washed linen cloth covering up the feathers. Roast.

When cooled, put 3’ long slices of salt pork on poles; and on each pole place a piece of diced orange and streaky bacon. If desired adorn them with three garlands and put one orange on the top and another on the bottom. Put a nail under each orange to fix it in position.

When a long pole is ready, tie towels or small linen towels to it, dampen those and those of the fowl with cold water to prevent burning. When cooked and placed on the carving board, remove the cloths and carve like a goose.

roast peacock anyone?
Photo by: Viv K67
Make one incision on the skull in the upper part, another in the leg and a third on in the buttock.

THE RECIPE TODAY

This recipe, in a modern home today where fowl is not raised and grocery stores sell cleaned fowl without necks or claws, to say nothing of the head, can be adjusted as follows:

Ingredients

1 chicken, pheasant or peacock[1]
11-12 oz chunks of bacon
1 orange quartered
Seasoning: 1 pinch of salt, pepper and 1 tbsp marjoram

Sauce: ½ c olive oil, ½ tsp nutmeg, 1 pinch of salt and ¼ tsp pepper

Preparation

A Roast to Melt in Your Mouth!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
PREHEAT OVEN TO 400ºF/100º C

If the fowl to be used has feathers, pluck except the head, neck and tail. Remove the viscera and wash the bird, bacon and orange.

Season the fowl inside and out. Quarter the orange. Stuff the cavity with bacon and the orange.  Sew up the cavity.  Tie the legs and wings securely to the body. Cover the feathers with cold wet rags and roast the bird in a pan for 45 minutes.

Remove the fowl from the oven and soak the rags in cold water. Cover the feathers with rags and secure them in place.  Secure the bird on a spit and roast it 45 more minutes or until done. 

Make the oil sauce and baste the bird with this about every 10 minutes while roasting on the spit.

When roasted, present the bird whole with the head, neck and tail, if possible. The neck can be decorated with a mantilla or a garland of fruit and berries if available.

NOTE: Variations of this recipe can be found in the blog titled "albarda," published October 25, 2010 and the blog titled "asaz," published May 12, 2011.



[1] A chicken weighing about 1 ½ lbs was used.

Wednesday, October 23, 2013

CUCHILLO WITH LITTLE BIRDS MADE OF LAMB RECIPE FROM THE 13TH CENTURY


Knives
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCast seranil, OLeon cutillo, Leon cuchiello, Eng  knife. In medieval times, carving knives were fundamental in any household. There had particular shapes and sizes for slicing each type of food such as fish, meat and vegetables. They could be wooden, metal or silver in aristocratic homes. These were used also to pick chunks of food out of platters laid on the table for self-service. In the 10th C, these were sold by boys in the market of León.

Normally, English guests were required to bring own knives when invited out. During the 15th C, two country girls on the way to a neighbor’s estate for dinner suddenly realized they had forgotten their knives. They dashed home to fetch them. Running back at full speed, they both slipped and fell into a puddle. They arrived late, wet and muddy but with their knives.

Generally, Spanish knives were made in Toledo. The English procured them from there and from Flanders.

[Benavides-Barajas. Alhambra. 1999:53; Berceo/Montoya. 1983:99:155:b; ES: “Gastronomia.” May 2, 03; García Rey.1934: 68; and Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:47:ftn 64]

A RECIPE FOR LITTLE BIRDS MADE WITH LAMB ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN, AL ANDALUS #31 RECETA DE PÁJAROS HECHOS CON CARNE DE OVEJA, pp 30-31

Lamb Bird Shapes Cut out with Kniives
Photo by: Lord-Willliams 
Ingredients

1 leg of lamb
½ c flour*
1 egg yolk*
½ c olive oil

For the sauce:
3 tbsp vinegar
1 tsp murri[1]
2 tbsp virgin olive oil
½ tsp pepper
¼ tsp cumin
½ tsp saffron

Uniquely Delicious Hors d'oeuvres
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Have the butcher remove the meat from the bone. Have him slice half of it in filetes and grind the remainder.

Cut the filetes into the shape of birds.. Put them on a skewer and roast them or fry them with plenty of olive oil.

Mix the ground meat with flour little by little. Add some egg yolk to obtain a consistency to prevent the meat from falling apart. Take a cookie cutter in the shape of a bird and press it over the meat as if making cookies. Dip fingers into the egg yolk and spread it over a surface on which the meat will rest until fried. This prevents it from sticking to the plate or platter. Fry the birds made of ground meat and set aside.

Make a sauce combining the ingredients above and bring it to a boil. Taste for strength. If too strong add a few tablespoons of mutton broth. Add the birds and bring the sauce to a boil again. This is a uniquely delicious hors d'oeuvres for lamb lovers!

*The Medieval Spanish Chef’s addition.




[1] See blog titled almorí published August 25, 2011 for recipe.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

CUERVO WITH 15th CENTURY RECIPE FOR RAVEN PIE

Raven
Photo by: Bryan Harder
OCast. cuerua, L. Corvus corax, Eng. raven. Although the largest of the crow family, it is difficult to distinguish it from the carrion crow, see below. It does have a shiny coat. Today, it is more abundant in Andalusia and Estremadura, Spain than its relative. Like it, this bird lives anywhere between the mountains and the coast. Its crook is more disagreeable than the carrion crow but can make musical sounds and sing variations for its mate. It is more likely that ravens were actually baked in Al-Andalus pies than the carrion crow, although its meat too was considered noxious. Avenzoar stated that crows are hot, dry and have irritable nature and generate a noxious chemical. He concluded that in spite of this they are eaten but if cooked well, they can be beneficial. See halcón. [Benavides-Barajas. Nueva-Clásica. 1995:199; Gázquez. 2002:189; Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:54; and Jutglar. 1999:521]

RECIPE FOR RAVEN PIE ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S RECIPE xxxvii-3 A POTTAGE CALLED PORRIOLA, PORTAJE QUE SE DICE PORIOLA

For 4 persons

Ingredients

1 whole chicken[1] about 4 lbs
3 onions
½ c olive oil
1 c sweet white wine
¼ c vinegar
ground pepper
salt to taste
1 c chicken broth

Preparation

Chop the onions with a knife and cover them with water and a little salt.

Let sit ½ hr. Drain off water and wring the onions out by hand. Put this in a pan with olive oil and slowly suatee them; when almost golden, drain off excess oil and save.  Add white wine and vinegar; let this cook together slowly. Cut the chicken into pieces and seasoned with ground pepper. Fry it in the oil saved from the onion. Then add this to the other ingredients. Gently cook all.

Prepare dough for a pie. Line a pie tin. Fill it with chickpeas and bake 15-20 minutes. Remove the chickpeas and fill the pie with the chicken and onions. Top the pie with pastry. Bake 15-20 minutes until pastry is golden brown.

Play a CD with music for a dish to be set before a king. Tell the guests the pie consists of five and twenty black birds!


[1] Assuming 20 ravens are not available.

Monday, October 21, 2013

CUCHARÓN WITH MARINATED RABBIT RECIPE FROM THE 14TH CENTURY


CUCHARÓN
Photo by: Lord-Williams
a large wooden spoon 60-70 cms. long used to stir, separate and serve food. See trulione.  EN-US; Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:>147; and Serradilla. 1993:141]

MARINATED RABBIT ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ LXVIII QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FFER SALSA ROSTA A CONILS. pp 110-111
For 4 persons

Ingredients

1 tsp mixed spices
1 sprig rosemary*
1 c vinegar that is not too strong
1 c red wine*
1 c water[1]
2 rabbits
1 onion whole and skinned*
1 garlic clove whole and peeled*
salt to taste


Deboned Rabbit in Jelly
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Mixed spices, rosemary, vinegar  and water. Bring to a boil.

Heat pieces of tile. When hot put it in the pot for the sauce to bubble. Reduce heat and boil gently for 20 minutes.

Remove the pieces of tile and add pieces of salted rabbit, onion and garlic. Continue boiling gently for about 20 minutes until the meat is tender and the sauce thickens. Taste and add more salt if need.





*Additions by Medieval Spanish Chef.
[1] Chicken broth was used instead to give more flavor.

Friday, October 18, 2013

CUCHARA WITH SHEEP TROTTER POTTAGE

Spoons
(handcarved boxwood)
Photo by longword
Leon cuchar, Eng spoon. The spoon is thought to have been an invention of the Egyptian pharaohs which disappeared in Europe during the barbarian invasions. The instrument did not come back until after the invention of the bowl for consumption of liquids. Still the use of the spoon from the 13-15 C. was not frequent among Christians. Various spoons made of metal, such as pewter and wood were used in the Spanish court for serving sauces, food items and cooking. 

At the family dinner table, there was one wooden spoon at the table, which was passed from one to another or one was shared by two people in luxurious homes. All the food was served in the same dish. The wooden spoon, therefore, enabled eaters to place their ration of food on their plate.

Hispano Árabs, introduced the spoon for “Spoon Dishes” (Platos de la Cuchara) consisting of pottages and thick soppes, which were they ate with spoons. Christians began adopting this system using boxwood spoons as the Church prohibited the contact of metal utensils in the mouth when eating. Gradually, one spoon was provided to each eater in court and among nobles. See cocleare, rebanada and trulione.
[Benavides-Barajas. Alhambra. 1999:53; ES: Cuesta. Dec 1, 03; ES “Gastronomía.” May 2, 03; García Rey.1934: 68; and Nola/Iranzo. 1982:168]

SHEEP TROTTER POTTAGE ADAPTED FROM NOLA,xvi-3 POTAJE DE MANOS DE CARNERO

Ingredients

2 lbs sheep trotters
Sheep Trotter Pottage
A Unique Dish Today!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 qt mutton broth
1 c almonds
1 ginger scraping
1 tbsp sugar

Preparation

Cook sheep trotters in a pressure cooker wit the broth. Cook on high for 20 minutes. Reduce heat to simmer to minutes.

Separate the trotters from the broth. Grind almonds in a food processer. Add them to the broth. Let sit for a half hour. Then stain them through a cheese cloth and put the almond milk into a clean pot. Add ground ginger. Be sure there is enough ginger for the taste to dominate the flavor. Add sugar and bring it to a boil again.

Remove the tissue around the bones of the trotters and place it on a wooden plate with the sauce in a bowl on the side.


Wednesday, October 16, 2013

CUBO WITH OXYMEL CURES FROM THE 13TH CENTURY


Cubo
Photo by: Lord-Williams
tapered wooden or metal cone shaped drinking vessel, wider at the top then the bottom and having a handle; a pail or bucket for liquids wih handles. [Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:42]

A SIMPLE “SIKANJABÎN” (OXYMEL) SYRUP ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN, AL ANDALUS, #507 JARABE DE SIKANJABÎN” SIMPLE, p 277

Ingredients for Jaundice

1/2 c strong vinegar*
1 c sugar

Oxymel for Juandice
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients for Phlegmative Illnessses

¾ c sour vinegar*
2 c honey
2 c sugar


For Jaundice:

Mix the vinegar and sugar. Cook until the consistency thickens like syrup. Before breakfast, drink 2 tbsp of this with 1/3 c hot water; it reduces fevers caused by jaundice, calms jaundice and quenches the thirst.

Oxymel for Phlegmatic Illnesses
Photo by: Lord-Williams
For Phlegmatic Illnesses:

Since sikanjabîn syrup is beneficial in phlegmatic and bilious fevers accompanied by vomiting. Make a syrup with sour vinegar, honey and sugar. Cook until the consistency is like syrup. Drink it to relax the stomach, quench the thirst, reduce vomiting and lower fevers accompanied by vomiting or diarrhea. It relaxes bowels and is admirable.

*Balsamic vinegar was used. It is a nice non-alcoholic drink especially in summer to quench the thirst.´



Monday, October 14, 2013

CUBILETE WITH A HEALTHY13TH CENTURY APPLE SOFT DRINK - BETTER THAN SODA

A Refreshing and Healthy Soft Drink in a Goblet
Photo by: Lord-Williams 
1. a tapered goblet smaller than a cubo from which nobles drank. They were rarely made of glass, for the cost and fragileness, but could be made of earthenware, pewter, silver, wood or stone. An English type was made of pewter and had a beak, called a pinchón (long point). The Archbishop of Toledo was known to have owned one in the 14 C. Upper classes owned decorated goblets. Although it was thought crude to drink from pitchers made of earthenware, silver or pewter, it was the common way of drinking. 2. a measure of one half cup. 3. thimble shaped pudding mold. 4. Dice box. 5. Bowler hat. See mirrauste. [Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:38:42]

APPLE SYRUP ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN, AL-ANDALUS #519 JARABE DE MANZANA, p 282 

Ingredients

1 lb sweet apples
1 lb sugar
1 oz aloe stem

Preparing the Aloe Stalk in Cloth Bag
Photo by: Lord-Williams
 Preparation

Wash, peel and core the apples. Boil them in water until mushy.

Strain off the broth, while pressing the pulp to release the juice. Save the pulp to make apple sauce and put the broth back into the pot. Add sugar.

Cut the aloe stem into pieces to fit into the cloth bag. Just before adding it to the broth mash it in the bag with a mallet. Add it to the mixture and bring it to a boil. Lower heat. Press a wooden spoon on the bag to release the gel from the aloe stem. Gently boil until a syrup is formed.

When done discard the skin from the aloe stalk in the cloth bag..

Drink 1 oz of the syrup with 2 oz of hot water in a goblet, i.e. 1/8 c to ¼ c. This fortalices the heart and produces happiness.



Friday, October 11, 2013

CUBIERTO WITH A COVERED WITH A DELIGHTFUL TWIST

Stuffed Chicken Covered with Broth
Photo by: Lord-Williams
tapado, OCast cobijado, Eng well covered to prevent the heat from escaping. Sometimes rags were wrapped around the dish or pot after covering to insure this or a lid was put on top and sealed with a mixture of flour and water. [Nola/Iranzo.1982:168; and Nola/Pérez.1994:192]

A COVERED DISH ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF AL-ANDALUS #46. PLATO CUBIERTO – “MAGMÛM”
For 4 persons

Ingredients

1 chicken, goose, pigeons or other fowl, enough
Pot Sealed with Flour and Water Paste Ready for Oven
Photo by: Lord-Williams
for 4 persons
salt to taste
1 tbsp virgin olive oil
1 small onion
½ tsp pepper
1 tsp ground coriander
1 qt chicken broth
1 tsp murri
1 tsp saffron
1 tsp lavender
a few citron leaves
a few sprigs of thyme
2-3 limes
½ c coarsely ground almonds
2 tbsp flour to make a paste with water

Preparation

A Dish with a Delightful Twist thanks to the combination
of Limes, Almonds, etC
Photo by: Lord-WilliamS
Clean the fowl and place it whole in a pan with the breast slit on the sides. Stuff the breast with chopped onion, ground pepper and coriander and tie shut. Cover with water and boil about 15 minutes until half cooked.

Remove the onion from the cavity of the fowl nd put the bird in another pot. Put the broth in a bowl with the onion and add murri, saffron, lavender, citron leaves and sprigs of thyme. Mix this together. Cut limes in half and stuff them into the bird(s) cavities and pour the sauce over it. Sprinkle it with almonds.

Preheat oven to 375º F/190º C

Place the lid on the pot and seal it with a flour and water paste. Roast until almost done, about 15-20 minutes. Remove lid, cutting away the hardened flour paste with a paring knife. Push the almonds and other seasoning off the breast of the bird. Return to oven to brown the breast, about 10 minutes.

At can be serve as is after carving or the sauce can be thickened with 1 tbsp flour or 2 tbsp breadcrumbs.. This is a nutritious dish and good for those with delicate stomachs.



Wednesday, October 9, 2013

CUBAITA (Hisp Ar) WITH SESAME PASTE FROM THE 12TH CENTURY

Toasted Sesame Seeds Ready for Ginding
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ar, qubbāt qubbayt, qubbayta, qubbaytā, sesame paste boiled in honey. Avenzoar, in the 12th C, recommended it for those of a cold nature who were not suffering from fever. [García Sánchez. 1992:97]

SESAME PASTE, A FORERUNNER OF TAHINI*, ADAPTED BY THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF

Ingredients

½ lb white raw sesame seeds
¾ c tbsp olive oil
½ c honey
1 punch of salt

Preparation

Chicken Wings with Sesame Paste
A Change for the Same!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Wash the seeds well in a sieve with running water. Dry them in a towel to remove all the water.

Roast sesame seeds in a pan, stirring constantly. No oil is necessary. Roast until toasted in about 10 minutes or until a crackling sound is heard.

Grind the seeds in a food processor. Add the oil little by little until a peanut butter texture is obtained. Put this in a saucepan and heat. Stir in honey and a pinch of salt.

When well combined serve immediately or refrigerate in an airtight container.

Serve as a dip, with spinach, chicken, pasta or veggies. It can be eaten warm or cold. 

*See ajonjoí publihed November 17, 2011 for tahini recipe.


Monday, October 7, 2013

CUBA

Cuba from the Roija
Property of the El 5º Elemento.
Restaurant, Madrid, Spain
Photo by: Lord-Williams
a wooden vat, tub, barrel or cask used for liquids. Vintners are very particular about the kind of wood used for it flavors the wine while fermenting. [Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:42; and Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:45:117:119 etc]


Friday, October 4, 2013

CUARTO WITH A 15TH CENTURY DISH OF GOOD ROCKET

OK so its a US quarter - so the tradition is carried on!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCast quarto, Eng 1. one fourth; one quarter. 2. Spanish medieval coin first made of silver mixed with copper but soon changed to copper only, weighing 1.35 grams. By the 14th and 15th centuries, at least, it was worth 4 mrs. 3. measurement of 1/4 oz. or the quantity of the ingredient that was bought with one cuarto, the coin or one fourth. Note that in Nola’s recipes instead of giving the quantity of the ingredient, he only gives the cost of that quantity, five fourths sounds odd but he is saying pay five coins of ingredient “X” and put that in the pot. See maravidís. [ES: “Dicc de Monedas.” n/d; ES: Carroll-Mann. Guisados 2-art. Jun 6, 01:104:ftn121; Nola. 1989:xlix-6; Nola/Iranzo.1982:171; and Nola/Pérez.1994:214]

GOOD ROCKET ADAPTED FROM NOLA xlix-5 ORUGA BUENA

Squeezing the Bag of Rocket between 2 Boards
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

1 lb rocket
½ c honey
½  c vinegar
½  tsp (Nola says 1 cuarto) ground cinnamon
½  tsp (Nola says 1 cuarto) ground saffron
1 ½  tsp (Nola says 3 cuartos) ginger scraping

Preparation

Wash the rocket. Chop well and put it in a clean white cloth. Tie it with a string.

Put water in a pan and bring it to a boil. Add the rocket and scald it. Remove it and sweeze out all the water.


A Dish of Rocket

Photo by: Lord-Williams
Clarify honey, skimming constantly.

Remove the cloth and fluff with a fork while adding vinegar and clarified honey. Add spices. Mix well. If too thick add a little vinegar.

Serve cold or warm. It is a nice variation from salads and spinach.