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Monday, February 10, 2014

EMBORRAZAR WITH 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR ARMOURED CHICKEN

Barded with First Coat of "Armour"
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCast emborraçar, Eng to bard as in cloth or armour for a horse. Culinarily it means to cover or dress food for roasting. Large pieces of pork fat or strips of bacon were laid on the meat. As seen in recipes for Gallina armada (armored hen) another “armour” of egg yolks and flour is also applied. Although Nola instructs that the yolks be painted on the hen with the point of the handle of a wooden spoon, normally it was done with a feather. Slices of salt pork were used to prevent roasts (fowl in particular) from drying out during cooking. See albardilla.

Barding should not be confused with larding. Larded meats are studded with slices of lard inserted in the meat. Barding is a coat of fat surrounding the meat. It is removed prior to serving while lard is left in the meat when carved. [ES: Carroll-Mann. Guisados 2-art. Jun 6, 01:97:ftn 27; Delgado. 1985:94; Nola. 1989:xx-2: xxiiii-1; Nola/Iranzo. 1982:169; and Nola/Pérez.1994:195]

ARMOURED CHICKEN OR CHICKEN DRESSED FOR ROASTING ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S xx-2 GALLINA ARMADA [1]

Ingredients

Barded with Bacon, Egg and Flour
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 chicken about 5 lbs
2 tbsp olive oil
5 oz bacon
salt to taste
1-2 egg yolks
1/3 c flour
1 tsp salt

Preparation

PREHEAT OVEN TO 350ºC/175ºC

Clean the hen and scorch it.  Cut off the claws and neck. Sprinkle with salt and tie the legs with a cord. Put it on a plate and rub with oil. Roast it slowly on a spit for about 1 hour but can be roasted in a pan if a spit is not available.  

Barded Roast Ready for Carving
Photo by: Lord-Williams
When half roasted cooked, remove from oven and let cool a little. Bard it with long thin slices of bacon and tie it with cord wrapped around the fowl three of four times. Paint the hen with slightly beaten egg yolk using a spoon or a stick.[2] Mix sifted flour and ground salt and powder the fowl over the bacon and egg. Return to oven and finish roasting slowly for another hour.

When finished it should be colorful and the crust will be most tasty. Remove the bacon and fry it. When cool crumble it.

Carve the hen as per Villena’s instructions, removing the appendages first and then slicing the breast. Sprinkle with crumbled bacon[3] and serve.



[1] See anda published September 29, 2011 with a variation of this recipe.
[2] The Medieval Spanish Chef used a paint brush.
[3] The Medieval Spanish Chef’s addition.

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