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Monday, April 21, 2014

ESCUDILLA WITH 14TH C PEACOCK SAUCE WITH ALMOND MILK POTTAGE

Escudilla - An Individual Soup Bowl
One Serving
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCast scudilla,scala,sopera, Cat escudella, OCat scudella, Leon escudiella,[1]

1. individual soup bowl or large cup for other liquids. In Catalonia, they were deep, hemispherical with small handles called orelletes. Normally they were glazed earthenware or wooden. In Leon, they are wooden bowls or plates used in smoking and serving meat. They are most appropriate for eating botillo. Egyptian pharaohs first used them. Europeans copied them but they disappeared with the Barbarian Invasions in the 5th C. Later, probably during the 7th C in Spain, the bowl came back for soups and other dishes served with spoons. When the bowl was au gratin or had a crust on top, then it was shared between two eaters.

2. a serving. If a recipe calls for six escudillas, it is for six portions.


3. a measurement estimated to be about 600 ml or 20 fl.oz today.

4. soup, pottage, or cream sauce.

[Anón/Grewe. 1982: XXVIIII:78:XXXXIIII:86:XXXXVII:91 etc; ES: Carroll-Mann. Guisados 2-art. Jun 6, 01: glos; García Rey.1934: 85; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002: 123:211; Lladonosa. Cocina. 1984:63:157; Nola. 1989:xiii-3:xx-1:xxxi-2 etc; Nola/Pérez. 1994:196; Ruíz/Brey. 1965: 1175a186; Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:154:202]

PEACOCK SAUCE WITH ALMOND MILK POTTAGE ADAPTED FROM ANÓN, SENT SOVÍ XXXXIIII QUI PARLA CON DE DEU FER SALSAS DE PAGUÓ AB LET DE MELLES, pp 86-89
6 Servings

Ingredients

Frying Guts and Hearts
Photo by: Lord-Williams
For a broth:
bones and entails from 1 chicken
or
3 lamb hocks
2 lamb stomachs

300 gr scalded and peeled almonds

8 stripes of streaky bacon
guts from 2 chickens
2 chicken hearts
2 rabbit hearts
lard or bacon grease for frying
2 onions
juice from 2 lemons, oranges or bitter pomegranates
2 tbsp honey

Peacock Sauce
In a Bowl or Escudilla
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Peacock Sauce:
1½ tsp ginger scrapings
1½ tbsp cinnamon
1½ tsp cloves
1/3 tsp cardamon
¾ tsp saffron

Other spices:
1 tsp ginger shavings
1 tsp freshly ground cinnamon
2 tsp mashed and dissolved saffron



Optional
1 chicken liver
10-12 chicken wings

Preparation

The Pottage Before Adding Chicken Wings
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Make a chicken broth or lamb. Mix 1 qt broth with almonds. Let soak for 6 hours. Chop the almonds, strain this and set aside.

Fry the bacon and set aside. Save the bacon and the grease.

Chop the guts and hearts. Gently fry them in lard or bacon grease. Separate the meat from the fat. When cooked remove and set aside.

Scald onions in boiling water. Quarter the onions and fry them in the lard or grease. When translucent, remove excess grease. Chop the onions, the gut mixture and the bacon to make a paste. Put this back in the frying pan.

The Pottage with Chunks of Chicken Meat
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Add the juice with honey, 1 tsp peacock sauce, the other spices. Add almond milk and bring to a boil for 5-10 minutes until cooked.

When it appears to be cooked taste to insure that it is sweet and sour enhanced by the seasoning. The color should be that of a mixture of cinnamon with saffron.

Grease from spit roasting pheasant or chicken can be added but care must be taken not to make the sauce too greasy.

Also a chopped chicken liver may be added after straining it through a sieve with a little broth. Chopped wing meat from chickens or pheasants can added as well. It is recommended to mash the meat in a mortar and strain it.[2] The sauce should be thick and served in small portions.


[1] ES: Carroll-Mann. Guisados 2-art. Jun 6, 01: glos states:

Escudilla, "Dish" is used in three ways in the text. First, it refers to a bowl. Second, it is used as a synonym for "a serving". Many of the recipes say, "and this will make number of escudillas". Lastly, it is a measurement of volume, much like 19th century recipes call for a "wineglass" or a "teacup" of a certain ingredient. A recipe for preserved dates in Granado calls for "three pounds of water, or three escudillas" (Granado, 395) which seems to indicate that the escudillas of that time held about 16 fl. oz. Studies of 15th and 16th century Iberian pottery found at archeological sites show that escudillas varied in size, with rim diameters ranging from 8 cm. to 15 cm. (about 3-3/8 to 6 inches), but 13-14 cm. (about 5-1/4 to 6 inches) seems to have been the most common. A modern bowl in my kitchen, whose shape and proportions are similar to illustrations of medieval escudillas has a rim diameter of 13-1/2 cm. and a capacity of 600 ml. (about 20 fl. oz.).”

[2] This batch was made by simply adding whole raw chicken wings with bones and skin to the sauce. When the meat was cooked the "medieval carver" removed the skin and bones from the wings and put the chunks of meat back into the pottage without mashing it in a mortar.

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