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Wednesday, June 25, 2014

ESTUFADOR WITH 15TH C RECIPES FOR OCTOPUS AND SWEET AND SOUR PARSELY SAUCE

Clay Tajine Sealed with Flour and Water
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ar, yakhnie, Fr. etouffée, Eng. pot, stewpot. It could also be a tajine. The Spanish is derived from the French étouffer, to drown, to asphyxiate. At first this was a clay pot, developed some 10,000 years ago, tightly covered with cloth to prevent the vapor or aroma from escaping. This developed into what is known today as the pressure cooker. Islamic doctrine prohibited stews containing dead animals. This rule was followed until the arrival of the Berbers in Al-Andalus who helped change traditions. With this and the influence of Jewish doctrine, the rule was stretched to permit salted meat to be consumed in stews with seasoning that actually originated from Persian cookery. Concern for freshness was a vital part of the culture. [Benavides-Barajas. Nueva-Clásica. 1995:239]

OCTOPUS ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S RECIPE lxvi-3 PULPO

Gold-ringed octopus
(Octopus membranaceus)
trying to escape
Photo from: Arne Kuilman

Ingredients
1 octopus 12-16 oz.
1 tbsp olive oil
1 onion quartered
1 leek, cut into chunks
2 bay leaves
2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
2 tbsp chopped fresh thyme
2 tsp black peppercorns




Today's Estufador
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Octopus is a very tough fish and for this reason, it should be whipped and beaten a lot.

Wash it well, removing the innards from the head sack and rinse well[1]. Cook the octopus whole or separate the head from the tentacles.

Put all the ingredients, except the octopus in a pressure cooker or large stock pot and fill it 2/3 full of water. Do not add salt because this fish contains such a high level of salt. The broth will turn a brick red color. Tightly close the top[2] and bring to a brisk boil for 5 minutes in order to create vegetable stock to give more aroma to the octopus.

Remove from heat and add the octopus. Bring to a brisk boil again and boil rapidly for 15 minutes after the water starts to boil if using a pressure cooker. If using a pot cook 30 minutes. Check with the point of a paring knife to see if it is tender. When the knife enters with easy it is done. Do not cook any more or the octopus will become tough again and will begin to dry out.

Remove the octopus from the broth and slice it. Serve with parsley sauce[3].

SWEET AND SOUR PARSLEY SAUCE ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S RECIPE l-3
PEREJIL

Sweet and Sour Parsley Sauce
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

1 c parsley leaves
1 slice of toast
½ vinegar
¼ tsp ground white pepper
½ honey



Preparation

Remove leaves from stems and wash the leaves well. Put them in a food processor, cover with water and chop them. Strain off the water and put the leaves in the food processor again. Add crustless bread soaked in white vinegar and grind.

Put this mixture in a pot. Put the honey in a separate pot and heat it until it has melted. Pour it into the pot with the parsley and slow heat,. Mix well, stirring in one direction until the honey is incorporated into the sauce. If too thick add a little water and vinegar. When the mixture turns ruddy and red. Taste for flavor. It should taste of a little sweet and sour, pepper and parsley.




[1]  If buying from a fishmonger have him clean it. If buying frozen octopus is cleaned before freezing.
[2] If cooking the medieval way, use a pot and seal the lid with a paste made out of flour and water.
[3] Customarily, it is served with rice.

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