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Friday, July 18, 2014

FARTÛN WITH A TOTALLY A UNIQUE SWEET AND SOUR OMELET

 A photo of afarţūn could not be found.
This looks like it meets the description.
Photo by: Lord-Williams
farţūn  (Hisp Ar) Ar hartón 1. a utensil which has the shape of a large with a narrow bottom and a wide mouth. 2. Arab omelet, in the shape of a monk’s head, with honey, saffron, almonds, cinnamon and vinegar. Its the fifth dish in the order of seven served during meals. [Anón/Huici. 1996:15:22:133:91; and ES: Anon/Perry. Sep 5 02:16:46]


A RECIPE OF FARTÛN, A UNIQUE ALMOND OMELET ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S AL-ANDALUS TRANSLATION OF #15 RECETA DEL “FARTÛN[1],” p 91

Ingredients

2/3 c raw almonds
½  c vinegar
¼ c brown sugar[2]
1 tbsp. mashed saffron
This is Strange
Photo by: Lord-Williams
¼ tsp salt
3 tbsp olive oil
6 eggs
½ tsp cinnamon

Garnish

raisins
hazelnuts
food coloring
almonds

a drizzle of honey


Preparation

Peel the almonds. Divide them into slivers. Heat the vinegar and sugar. When the sugar is dissolved add almonds and coat them. Sprinkle them with salt and toss them to divide the salt evenly.

TOTALLY UNIQUE
A Sweet and Sour Omelette!
Food Colored Raisen Blue Eyes, Red Almond Nose, Hole for Mouth
with Olive Oil Mouth and Red Almond Tongue and Hazelnut Eyebrows
Photo by: Lord-Williams
 
Heat a fartûn or other pot. Heat it and add olive oil. Beat the eggs whites until stiff. Beat yolks and fold them into the egg whites. Pour the almonds vinegar mixture nto this. Add  saffron and cinnamon. Fold all together and pour this into the fartûn.  When the bottom side is golden brown,  slide a knife around the edges to loosen it from the pan and turn it out on the lid. Slip it back into the pan and cook the other side. Then carefully turn it out on to a plate.

Make a hole and pour a little oil into it for the mouth. Add garnish to make eyes, nose and mouth to like a real monkey's head. Decorate it to look like a monkey and drizzle it with honey.



[1] Huici explains that this is a Hispanicism for hartón as indicated by its’ shape; it is the šašía, according to al-Šaqūrī, who provides the recipe in folder 60r.

[2] Sugar is not indicated in the recipe but it seems appropriate for the medieval use of sweet and sour preparations.

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