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Monday, October 20, 2014

GAÑIVETE WITH 13TH C RECIPE FOR BOILED AND FRIED CARROTS


canif1
Photo from: Dominique Montestier
Fr. canif, ganivet, canivet, Eng. penknife, pocketknife, paring knife, a 25 cm curved knife. It can be used to slaughter animals. Villena gives detailed instructions on its use in carving. He instructs, for example that when preparing trout, first the head is cut off with a small gañivete. The small knife is used to slit open the side and remove the bones starting from the tail, the bones are plucked out with the tip of the knife.

Villena also explains that it is used to cut bread and to skin fruit. The skin of truffles is removed with this knife. It is used to skin carrots and when preparing thistle and atrichokes.  [Covaarrubias. 1998:627:a:50; and Villena/Calero. 2002:23a: 38a-38b:39b:40a etc]

CARROTS ADAPTED FROM IBN RAZÍN/MARIN SECCIÓN SÉPTIMA, CAPÍTULO TERCERO, SOBRE LOS PLATOS DE ZANAHORA, p 277

Preparing Carrots with a Paring Knife
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

2 lbs carrots[1]
salt to taste
1 c olive oil for frying
½  c vinegar
1 garlic clove mashed
1 tsp caraway

with the addition of:[2]
¼ c honey
2 tsp Duke’s Powder[3]


Ganrish:
1 tbsp brown sugar


Preparation

A Typical Sweet and Sour Medieval Dish
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Cut off the tips and the bottoms of the carrots. Then cut them into thirds without skinning. Clean them and slice them lengthwise. Put then on boiling water with salt. When tender remove them and dry them. Fry them in a frying pan with olive oil. Then add boiling vinegar, mashed garlic and  caraway.

If following the Medieval Spanish Chef’s additions: Add the honey and Duke’s Powder. Mix all ingredients well. Before serving sprinkle with brown sugar.


[1] Orange carrots were used as white carrots were not available. White carrots would be more in keeping with the period.
[2] The following ingredients were added by the Medieval Spanisih Chef as the recipe tends to be insipid.
[3] See blog titled escrúpulo published April 18, 2014.

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