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Friday, January 31, 2014

EINA (Leon) WITH A SWIFTLY MADE ROCKET RECIPE FROM THE 15TH CENTURY

Washed Rocket
Photo by: Lord-Williams
 OCast and Leon, aína, Eng. quick, fast, soon, easily. The word is still used in the Maragato region and around Astorga, Asturias, Galicia, Santander and Vizcaya. [Berceo/Montoya. 1983:92:125b; Baena/Dutton. 1993:39:62:14:115:148:v31149:v70 etc; Dialecto. 1947:137; Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:150; and Ruíz/Brey. 1965:297b:78:366b: 85:820ª:140 etc]

ANOTHER GOOD ROCKET TO BE MADE SWIFTLY ADAPTED FROM PERÉZ’ TRANSLATION OF NOLA’S RECIPE  #152 OTRA ORUGA BUENA PARA DE PRESTO

Ingredients

400 gr rocket
Swiftly Made Rocket
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 tsp cinnamon
1 slice of bread without the crust
¼ c vinegar
½ c honey
1/8 c red or white wine

Garnish:
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp ginger scrapings

Preparation

Wash rocket and put it in boiling water for 2 or 3 minutes. Remove it from the water and squeeze out the water. Put the rocket in a food processor with the bread soaked in vinegar and the other ingredients. When chopped, put the mixture in a pot and bring it to a boil for the rocket to incorporate the honey.

Put it in a serving dish and garnish with cinnamon and ginger.







Wednesday, January 29, 2014

EDULCORANTES WITH 14TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR EGG AND CHEESE FRITTERS

Sweeteners
Photo by: Lord-Williams
sweeteners such as honey and sugar. [Gázquez. 2002:80]

EGG AND CHEESE FRITTERS ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ CL QUI PARLA CON SE FFAN RESOLES DE PASTE E D’OUS E DE FROMATGE, p 165

Ingredients

Step 1
1 ½ c water
½ c milk
4/5 oz lard
Making Circles with a Glass in the Dough
Photo by: Lord-Williams
4 c flour
1 egg
10 ½ oz grated cheese

Step 2
2 egg whites
2 c breadcrumbs
1 c olive oil
1 c sugar and/or honey

Preparation

Step 1

Hummy Fritters with Sugar and Honey
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Heat the water, milk and lard. When it begins to boil add the flour all at once. Mix with a wooden spoon until the dough does not stick to the pan. Remove from heat and place the dough on a floured surface. Let cool, add the egg slightly beaten and the cheese. Knead until smooth and firm.

Step 2

Roll out out until it is ¼” thick. Cut it in circles 2 ½” in diameter. Roll the circles up and close them. Dip them in egg whites and then breadcrumbs. Fry in hot oil until all sides are browned. Remove and set them on paper towels.


Extend half the sugar on a platter. Add the fritters and sprinkle the rest of the sugar over them. Add honey if desired. Serve immediately.

Monday, January 27, 2014

ECHÁRLA, -O WITH YAMAIL'S RECIPE FOR BAKED FISH

Ingredients to be Cast in the Bowl
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCast echargela, Eng to cast it, throw it, toss it.  [Anón/Huici. 1966:158:103: 173:113:227:138 etc; Ibn Razīn/Granja. 1960:287:28; Nola 1989:xiiii-4:xv-2:xv-3 etc; Nola/Iranzo.1982:169 and Nola/Peréz. 1994:82]

YAMAIL’S RECIPE FOR BAKED FISH ADAPTED FROM FADALAT #287 OTRO PLATO, SEGÚN LA RECETA DEL YAMALÍ

Fish Cleaned and Scaled
Photo by: Lord-Williams





Ingredients

1 large fish with scales
1 tsp salt
2 tbsp vinegar
1 tsp murri naqi[1]
¼ tsp white pepper
1 tsp crushed saffron
1 tsp ginger scraping
½ tsp cumin
½ tsp mastic
1 tbsp celery sprouts
12 orange leaves
2 bay leaves
2 sprigs of fennel
1 tsp oregano
1 garlic clove
¼ c olive oil

Preparation

Ibn Razīn instructs to scale large fish and leave it overnight in salt with a weight on top.  The result is too salty for modern taste buds. It is, therefore, recommended to omit this step.

After scaling and removing the bones, wash the fish and boil it in water with 1 tsp of salt for 10 minutes. After this wash it and let it dry.


A Tasty Treat for Fish Lovers
Photo by: Lord-Williams
PREHEAT OVEN TO 400ºF/205º CELSIUS

Place it in a pan. Make a dressing of the remaining ingredients casting them into a bowl and mixing them well. Coat the fish with this. Bake it in the oven 15-20 minutes, depending on the size and until the sauce is dry. Remove it when browned on top.



[1] See blog titled almorí published August 25, 2011 for recipe.


Friday, January 24, 2014

ECHA A MAL WITH RECIPE FOR BOILED CONGER EEL

Throwing out Leftover Broth
Photo by: Lord-Williams
throw away the garbage . [Nola. 1989:xiii-1:xlii-2:lxi-3 etc Nola/Pérez. 1994:120:195]


BOILED CONGER EEL ADAPTED FROM NOLA'S lxi-3 CONGRIO COCIDO

Ingredients

1 large conger eel
1 tbsp salt
1 c vinegar
1 tsp garum[1]

For the sauce:
1 c unpeeled almonds
¼ c hazelnuts
1 slice of crustless bread
1c white vinegar
2 c broth
¼ tsp white pepper
2 tbsp chopped parsley
1 tbsp chopped mint

Preparation


Conger Eel in Sauce
Photo by: Lord-Williams
The small conger eel is not good except for roasting; but if it is very large you can make a boiled plate of it; clean the conger eel well and scald it in boiling water; and then cut it into thick medallions. Fill a pot with water and heat it. When it boils, put the conger eel in it. Add plenty of salt because it gives the fish flavor. Add the vinegar because vinegar makes the fish firm and prevents the pieces from falling apart and it enhances the flavor.

For the sauce:

When the fish is cooked, make the sauce by grinding almonds in a food processor with hazelnuts. Blend in the vinegar and broth. Strain it through a woolen cloth. The sauce should be sour. Add pepper. When ready to eat, bring the sauce to a boil, add herbs and pour it over the fish.   



[1] The Medieval Spanish Chef’s addition. See blog titled almori published August 25, 2011 for recipe. 

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

DURAZNO WITH A POTTAGE CALLED A PEACH DISH



A Peach
Photo by: Lord-Williams
melocotón, L. Prunus persica, Ar. duraqin, jhukh, tuffāh farsī (Persian apple), Fr. pêrcher, Eng. peach. Durazno is derived from L. dūracĭnus, pulp adhering to the pit or a clingstone peach or cherry, while melecotón is from L. malum, fruit, generally referring to the apple and came too mean a variety of the durazno. “Peach” is a corruption of persica, meaning “Persian apple.” Around 300 B.C. Theophrastus, the Greek philosopher, thinking it came from Persia, named this fruit for that country. Pliny rightfully claimed that it originated in northern China and spread to India and Persia. The peach was taken to Greece for cultivation during the times of Alexander the Great, 1st C A.D. From there, about 200 years after it was first cultivated in China, it spread through the Mediterranean and finally to northern Europe but was not cultivated in England until 1650.

A Persian claim to fame is the invention of an infusion or syrup made with the flowers and still given to Spanish children as a laxative. Avenzoar related that the peach is cold and humid. If inhaled, it strengthens those prone to fainting fits. Eating the peach, he claimed, creates stomach vapors. He recommended the pit as a cleaner and to beautify the face and peach pit oil dropped into the ear to sooth and evacuate it and to diminish deafness. The flowers, as well as the leaves and pits, may be toxic. In Spain, therefore, they were totally ground to avoid poisoning. Peach pit flour was used to make bread during wheat famines. Juan Ruíz is the first to document the peach in Christian Spain. His Archpriest of Hita always kept peaches on hand in summer to give to pretty girls.
Pesche al vino bianco.....Peaches in White Wine
Photo from: Sante.boschianpest

The fruit is used in perfumes and added wine for the flavor and aroma as seen today in sangria. The fruit may be eaten raw, stewed or dried. A proverb in Spain is: Peras de vino, y vino de durazno.  (Pears poached in wine and peach wine.) Constable Miquel Lucas Iranzo offered them during festivities in the 1463 near the orchards of Baenza with melons, bread and wine.

Villena instructed that they should be peeled with a small curved knife while securing them with a trident. Then to cut the pulp in pieces up to the pit. They should be placed in wine using a two prong fork, he continued. They can be eaten in wine or without. He adds that to throw the pit into the bone bowl is bad manners. Oddly, in the 17th C. one reason Christians found Moors different was that they ate peaches. [AUT. II:O1979:352; Castro Alimentación. 1996:154; ES: Castro. “The Role.” Aug 3, 03; ES: Peach. Apr 7, 04; Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:75:119; Mata. 1940:136; Ruíz/Brey. 1965:862b:144; and Villena/Calero. 2002:23a:42b:43a]


A POTTAGE CALLED A PEACH DISH ADAPTED FROM NOLAS’S lii-4 POTAJE LLAMADO PERSICATE[1]



Peaches Ready for Stewing
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

6 ½ - 7 lbs large peaches
 (between 20-30)
2 c chicken broth 

1 c peeled and blanched almonds 

2 c sugar 

2 tsp ginger scrapings 
1 tsp cinnamon[2]
½ tsp nutmeg[2]


Garnish: 1 tsp sugar and a sprig of mint for each dish

Preparation

A Unique Dessert with a Medieval Twist
Photo by: Lord-Williams 
Peel and slice the peaches. Cook them in the broth until soft (about 10 minutes). Drain, reserving the liquid.

Grind the almonds. Add the liquid and let sit 20 minutes.

Grind the mixture again and strain the mixture through a coarse cloth into a pot. Warm the mixture and add sugar. When it becomes syrup add the peaches and the spices. Taste to insure they are sweet enough.

Serve in bowls and garnish with sugar and mint.

Quinces can be prepared in the same manner but they should be strained with the almonds. Taste to insure they are sweet enough.

The sauces are good for accompanying meat dishes



[1] See  blog titled Cuesco, published November 6, 2013, for a recipe for pit syrup.
[2] Addition by the Medieval Spanish Chef.