Entradas populares

Monday, March 31, 2014

ENTRAÑAS WITH 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR DUCK


Hanging Pig Entrails
Photo by: Lord Williams
 
offal, entrails, inwards, organ meat. This consists of tripe, heart, kidneys livers lungs and hooves or claws. As opposed to modern times, these were main ingredients of numerous dishes during the Middle Ages. See asadura, bofes and freixura. [Anón/Huici. 1966:25:27:170:110-111; etc; Gitlitz. 1999:15; Ibn Razīn/Granja. 1960:86:23; Lord. Unpublished:16; Nola/Iranzo. 1982:54; and Nola/Pérez. 1994:90]

RECIPE FOR ROASTING OTHER DISHES OF THE SAME (ANOTHER ROAST FROM ABŪ SĀLIH AL-RAHBĀNĪ 'S COOKBOOK) ADAPTED FROM THE 13TH C AL-ANDALUS #42. RECETA DEL ASADO DE OTRAS CLASES DEL MISMO (OTRA DE ABŪ SĀLIH AL-RAHBĀNĪ EN EL LIBRO DE COCINA), pp 35-36


Ingredients

Sticking the Slivers into the Fowl
Photo by: Lord-Williams
For the sauce: 

1 onion to make 6 tsp  onions juice
1 lb garlic cloves to make 6 tsp garlic juice
a few sprigs to make 6 tsp  cilantro water
6 tsp  murri[1]
2 c strong vinegar
1 c oil
2 ¼ tsp coriander
2 ¼ cassia
2 ¼ ginger
2 ¼ thyme
2 ¼ cumin

For the bird[2]
1 chicken plucked and washed
¼  c garlic cloves slivers
¼ c almonds  slivers
¼  c walnuts halved
¼ c ginger  slivers

Preparation


The Combination of Almonds and Ginger
Make this an Ideal Dish.
Grind onions and that of tender garlic. Extract the juice from each. Grind cilantro leaves in a little water and strain. Mix these juices with vinegar and oil. Add seasoning. Grind all this until dissolve.

Then get the aforementioned bird. Scald this fowl and take out what entrails there are and hang them up; then perforate its body with the point of a knife and place in each hole and fill them with the slivers of garlic, almonds, walnuts and ginger. Put the bird in the liquid and leave it overnight.

PREHEAT OVEN TO

The following morning take it out and roast it in a roasting pan and with the liguid. When it is ready, carve it and present it in the sauce[3]

It should be known that all roasts are digested slowly but they are  very nutritious. They restore one's strength, is not cold due to the chyme, if well-digested. As it is not complexed, nothing destorys it nutritious value. It is praised for its nutritiousness if not eaten en excess.

[1] See blog titled almorí published August 25, 2011.
[2] The text reads “oca de colina ; este pato . . . , “ which Perry translates as “qutr-goose, which is the duck.” As this type of goose or duck is not known a chicken was used.
[3] Flour was add to the sauce to thicken it and it is served on the side.

Friday, March 28, 2014

ENSALADA WITH A UNIQUELY MEDIEVAL RECIPE



THE MAD MAN!
I love tossing the Salad
Photo from Paul McDae(DeltaNiner)
Leon. ensalá, Eng. salad. In Spain, it is defined as food containing among other ingredients: herbs, meats, salted ingredients, fish, olives, conserves, egg yolks, borage, sugared almonds, lettuce, radishes and rocket. In the Middle Ages salad greens were composed of bugloss, lettuce, mint and catnip. No matter what the ingredients, Spanish salads always have had a vinegar and oil dressing and they are salted. A Spanish proverb states, “To make a good salad, four men are needed: for the salt, a wise man; for the oil, a prodigal man; for the vinegar, a stingy man; and to mix it, a crazy man. . .” In England it included: common greens and herbs such as parsley, garlic, onions and watercress; although used fennel, leeks, borage, mint, rue and purslane were not as common. See tabbouleh. [Drummond. 1964:59; Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:106; and Pers convers. Vías. Oct 18, 02]
Contemplating Salad Ingredients in the Backyard
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Ingredients

salt
oil
vinegar
a garden with greens, radishes, garlic and onions
an orchard with almond trees
a corral with pigs and cows
a chicken coup with hens

Preparation

Wash the ingredients well. Shred them and/or chop them. Give these ingredients to 4 men as described above.





Wednesday, March 26, 2014

ENSAIMADAS WITH A MODERN VERSION OF NOLA'S 15TH CENTURY RECIPE

Homemade Ensaimadas
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Cat. Val casquesta, It  pastisset(candied quince fritter), Eng ensaymada, a sweet Arab pastry. It was made with leaf pastry (which developed into fluffy pastry) in the shape of a spiral and filled with honey and nuts or other fritter paste; today it is like a croissant filled with angel hair. Lard in Arabic is saim. Ensaymada literally means lard in a mass (of flour and water).  It is typical of the Ebro River region where it is made with clarified pork lard instead of fat  from sheep as per the Arab custom. Casquestas are served in Xerta (Tarragona) on St. Martin’s Day. The ensaymada is a Malloquin specialty today. See cabello de ángel. [ES: Carroll-Mann. Guisados 1-art. Jun 6, 01:134:56:103:ftn 109; ES: Vicente. n/d; ES:
“Xerta,” n/d; and Nola.1989:xlv-3]


Weighing and Dividing Dough
Photo by: Lord-Williams
A MODERN VERSION ENSAyMADAS ADAPTED FROM THE THErMOMIX VERSION DATED MARCH 14, 2012 AND FROM NOLA’S XLV-3 ROSQUILLAS DE FRUTA QUE LLAMADA CASQUETAS EN VALANECIA Y EN BARCELONA[1]

½ c powdered sugar

for sour dough:
¼ c lukewarm water
2 tsp fresh or dry yeast
5/6 c bread flour

for the ensaymada dough:
            ½ c water
            1/3 c sugar
2 eggs
¼ c lard
1 c sour dough
4 c bread flour
½ tsp salt
2 tbsp olive oil
 
Painting Stretched Dough with Lard
Photo by: Lord-Williams
½ c melted lard

Filling at will.

Preparation

It is necessary to begin this recipe the day before it is to be served as the dough must rest overnight.

For the sour dough:

Dilute the yeast in water. Add the flour and all the other and beat until dough is even. Make it into the form of a soft ball and place it in lukewarm water. Leave until it begins to float (about 15 minutes).
Rolling Stretched Dough Lengthwise like a Snake
Photo by: Lord-Williams

For the “ensaymada” mixture:

Put all the ingredients except the olive oil into a mixing bowl. Mix until the dough is even, then knead it well. When done pour the oil over the surface of the dough. Cover with a cloth and let rest in a warm dry spot over night.

Divide the dough into 12 balls about 75 grams or 1/3 c each. Let sit one hour. Then roll each out making the dough as thin as possible. Paint each piece with melted lard. Line one side, lengthwise, with filling if desired[2]. Then roll the dough like a snake. Curl this like a sleeping snake with a little space between each curl. Put the ends under the dough to prevent them from growing when cooking.

Spraying Curled Snake-like Dough with Water
Photo by: Lord-Williams 
Grease and flour a cookie or baking sheet. Put each roll on it. Leave enough space for the masses to grow in volume.

PREHEAT OVEN TO 350ºF/180ºC.

Before baking, spray them with water. Bake for 40 to 60 minutes depending on the oven.

When done let cool on racks. Then sprinkle with powdered sugar and serve.

[1];For more primitive interpretations of this recipe see blogs titled amazar, published September 19, 2011 and bizcochar published March 14, 2012. Both recipes give detailed instructions for fillings as per Nola. This recipe today does not offer any particular filling but sweet sauces and pastes are most welcome.


Monday, March 24, 2014

ENRIQUE DE VILLENA, 1384-1434 KNOWN FOR "THE ART OF CARVING"

DON ENRIQUE DE ARAGON, 
marqués de Villena (sic)
From: eldesvandemislibros

also known as Enrique of Aragon, son of Pedro, a direct descendant of the kings of Aragon and Catalonia, and Juana, a bastard daughter of Enrique II of Castile.

He was born in Iniesta (Cuenca). As his father was killed in the Battle of Aljubarrota (1385) in Portugal. Alfonso of Aragon, the first Marquis of Villena, his paternal grandfather raised him.

 In 1398, Alfonso lost the title for his allegiance to Pedro I of Castile who was killed by his half brother Enrique II of Castile. The marquis and his grandson spent their lives in and out of the favor of the Aragonese and Castellan courts.

Enrique of Aragon had financial problems during most of his life. Sometimes the kings helped him but not always. Although called “the marquis,” Enrique of Aragon never actually held the title. Sometimes he is confused with Juan Pacheco, favourite of Henry IV, and successor to the marquisette after Enrique’s grandfather.

Enrique was a great intellectual of his age having studied alchemy, arithmetic, geometry, astrology and astronomy. His literary works seem to have been more outstanding than his scientific endeavours as he had good style and knowledge of Latin and Greek. Although several of his works were burned due to censorship, among those that survived are: Arte de trovar (The Art of Writing Verse), Arte cisoria y tratado del arte de cortar con cuchillo (The Art of Carving), Tratado de la lepra (Treaty on Leprosy), Menor daño de medicina (Less Pain in Medicine), Libro de aojamiento o fascinología (The Book of the Evil Eye or Sorcery), the poem Los doce trabajos de Hércules (The Twelve Works of Hercules), which he translated into Catalan, and his translations of the Divine Comedy, and Eneida.

Love me Tender
Photo from: falling_angel
The Art of Carving is of primary interest because Villena’s stress on hygiene to prevent the death or illness of the king. Not only did the carver have to have a clean body but had to wear gloves and rings with stones over them to ward off poisons.

In 1400 Enrique III of Castile arranged his marriage with Maria of Albornoz who owned vast extensions of land in the province of Cuenca. The couple divorced in 1420. Also Enrique III named Enrique of Aragon Master of the Knightly Order of Calatrava in 1404 but due to his bad reputation of being a sorcerer and other slander against him, the honor was withdrawn in 1414.

Removing the Stuffing from a Chicken
Photo by: Lord-Williams
In 1420 Juan II of Castile gave Enrique of Aragon the title of Lord of Iniesta, thus providing him with a village where he could retire in his old age. He had two bastard children. The second was the daughter of Sister Isabel de Villena. In the summer of 1434 he participated in Suero Quiñones’ jousting tournament. Later in the year he went to Madrid to request financing from the crown. He died in debt on December 15, 1434.

[Espasa. 1989:5:AM:1185; ES: “Enrique.” Jan 15, 03; and Villena/Calero. 2002:xv-xix:15-17]

HOW TO CARVE FOWL AS PER ENRIQUE DE VILLENA'S ARTE CISORIA (THE ART OF CARVING), 23b-24a

Small Plate in Rear with Chopped Wing Meat for King
Platter to Right with Leg Meat for Guests & Stuffing
Bowl for Bones
Slicing Breast
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Big, thick birds including crane, gosling, duck, pheasant, francolin, widgeons, roasters, castrated male chickens, heron and great bustards are carved in the following manner: 

Remove the neck and tail. Remove threads used to secure the fowl to the spit. Remove barding and/or stuffing. Cut off the claws and wings. Remove the skin from the wings, cut the meat off and chop into pieces. Put claws and bones in a bowl. Give the wings to the king to eat while carving the remainder of the bird.

Cut the legs off the body and separate the thighs from the lower part of the legs. Remove the skin. Secure the thigh with a trident and cut the meat into thick pieces until the bone is clean. Dice the meat and put it on a platter. After this, slice the meat around the pelvis near the thighs into thin slices and place that on the platter and offer it to the other eaters for the to begin this course. 

Slice the breast lengthwise on one side. When finished do the other side. Slice the rump or pope's nose. Then pull out the breastbone and cut it in half. Pull out the sternum and cut it in half. Then cut the pelvis and spinal cord into pieces. 

Neither the sternum nor the pelvis are cut in half when carving geese, gosling, cranes, heron and great bustards. . .