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Friday, May 30, 2014

ESTREMEÑA WITH 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR POUCHED PEARS IN ALMOND MILK FOR SICK PATIENTS

Straining Almond Milk through Bulap
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Cat sedá, tamix, MEng seue, syne, Eng tamis, strainer of fine woolen canvas or worsted cloth for straining sauces and soups. [Curye. 1985:214; ES: Carroll-Mann. Guisados 2-art. Jun 6, 01:96:ftn 14:109:glos; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:236; Nola. 1989:l-1:l-2:li-3 etc; and Villena/Calero. 2002:63a]

POUCHED PEARS THAT CAN BE GIVEN TO PATIENTS ADAPTED FROM NOLA liii-3 MIRRAUSTE DE PERAS Y PUEDESE DAR A ENFERMOS[1]

Ingredients
4 pears
1 qt meat broth
1 c peeled almonds
1 tbsp rice flour
2 tbsp sugar
1 stick of whole cinnamon
2 tbsp rosewater

Garnish
2 tsp sugar and cinnamon

Preparation

Pouched Pears in Almond Milk
For the Sick and the Healthy!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Select tender pears. Peel them, quarter them and remove the seeds and core; pouch them in meat broth for 15-20 minutes until soft.
Boil water in another saucepan and add the almonds. When the skins wrinkle, remove from heat and water and peel them. Grind them in a food grinder.

Strain the broth from the pears and add two cups of it to the food processor with the ground almonds. Stain this through a cloth into the pot without the pears.
Heat the almond milk. Add rice flour and sugar. Tie a stick of cinnamon with a string and add that to the pot. Cover and simmer until the sauce thickens.

Add the pears and rosewater.  Prepare dessert bowls sprinkle sugar and cinnamon over the pears and sauce. This is a good sauce for patients.



[1] See blog titled corvillo published August 19, 2013 for a different version of this recipe.

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

ESPIRMERLAS WITH 15TH C RECIPE FOR BLANCMANGE OF GOURDS


Squeeze Water Out of Pulp
Photo by: Lord-Williams
squeeze them. [ES: Lord. Culinary. Mar 4, ’08; Nola. 1989:xxiii-3:xxiiii-4: xxvii-2 etc; and Nola/Pérez. 1994:197]

BLANCMANGE OF GOURDS ADAPTED FROM NOLA lxix-1
MANJAR BLANCO DE CALABAZAS
For 4 persons

Ingredients

2 kg gourds
2 tbsp rosewater for sprinkling gourds
¼ c sugar
1 pt almond milk[1]
¼ c rosewater

Removing Squeezed Pulp from Rag
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Garnish
brown sugar

Preparation

Select tender gourds. Wash and peel the outer rinds. Remove the seeds and cut them into pieces the size of a hand. Put water in a pot and bring to a boil. Add gourds and remove them when cooked. Put them in a clean rag and squeeze out all the water.

Make almond milk. Sprinkle rosewater on the gourds. Add them to the almond milk. Add sugar.

Blancmange of Gourds
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Bring this to a boil stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. Cook them until the consistency is of a purée. Add rose water just before removing them from the heat. Put them in bowls and sprinkle with brown sugar.

Nola states that: - This recipe does not have measurements but ingredients should be added at the discretion of the cook because gourds by nature are filled with water; no one can say what is required except he who cooks it. -



[1] See blog titled almejas published August 10, 2011 for récipe.

Monday, May 26, 2014

ESPONJA, DE WITH A 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR SPONGE CAKE PUDDING TO DEFY ALL DIETS!

Sponge Cake Fresh Out of the Oven
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCast desponja, Ar. isfunja, Eng of sponge, sponge cake or dough. [Anón/Huici.1966: 180:117:393:215:477:260 etc; Nola/Iranzo.1982:168]

SPONGE CAKE PUDDING ENRICHED WITH CREAM SAUCE ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN, AL-ANDALUS #180. EMPANADA[1] DE ESPONJA CON LECHE, pp 117-118

Ingredients

For sponge cake:
6 eggs at room temperature
1 c white sugar
Sifting Flour into the Mixture
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 c plain flour
1/4 tsp salt
2 tsp baking powder

For the cream mixture:
½  c cream
1 egg white
1 ½ tbsp flour
2 tbsp  sugar[2]

For the topping:
½ c cream
1 egg yolk
1 tsp sugar

Garnish:
1 tbsp sugar
½ tsp cinnamon

Gently Shaking the Pan to Remove Air Bubbles
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

For the sponge cake:

PREHEAT OVEN TO 350ºF/175º C

Blend the eggs well in an electric mixer on high for 5 minutes.

Add sugar and continue beating on high for another 5 minutes. Add baking powder and salt. Continue beating on high for another minute and remove from the beaters.

Prepare a 9” Springform pan. Line the bottom with parchment paper.

Gently sift the flour into the dough in the mixing bowl. Gently fold the flour in with a rubber spatula until all is blended.

Pour the mixture into the Springform pan. Shake the pan gently to remove air bubbles.

Bake 30-35 minutes[3]. When done remove from oven.

When completely cooled, pop open the Springform pan. Loosen the side of the cake away from the tin with a knife.  Open the side of the pan and remove it. Flip the cake over and remove the bottom.

Put the cake into a serving dish and slice it for the cream mixture to soak the sponge cake.

 A Dessert to Defy All Diets - It's So GOOD!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
For the cream mixture:

Make the cream mixture with ingredients above. Put them in a saucepan and gently shake it until it thickens. Pour the milk mixture over the sponge cake until soaked.

Add the ingredients for the topping to the saucepan and gently heat. If it gels to quickly add regular milk to taste. Pour this over the sponge cake and sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon and serve warm, God willing and he will be it is so good!.



[1] Empanada normally is translated as "turnover" but the literal sense of the word means “in bread.
[2] The original recipe does not call for sugar but it is bland without it.
[3]The original recipe calls for frying the sponge cake but as the measurements of the ingredients are ambiguous, when adapted the dough is too soft for frying. It was baked as is the normal procedure for sponge cake today.

Friday, May 23, 2014

ESPOLETA WITH A DISH OF CHICKEN WITH WINE


Wishbone
Photo by: Jeanine Stewart
wishbone. [Villena/Calero. 2002:27a]

A DISH OF CHICKEN WITH WINE ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRNASLATION OF ANÓN, AL-ANDALUS #83 PLATO DE POLLO VINOSO, p 58-59 

Ingredients

1 whole chicken
2 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp onion juice from 1 onion
2 tbsp cilantro juice
10 peeled and ground almonds
1 garlic clove salt to taste 1 tbsp vinegar
Painting Chicken with Eggyolk
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 tbsp murri
1 tsp basil
1 tbsp wine[1]
1 handful basil
1 handful bee balm
1 handful rue
¾ tsp cassia
¾ tsp pepper
¾ tsp cinnamon ¾ tsp cloves
¾ tsp spike lavender
4 slightly beaten egg yolks

Garnish:
6 egg yolks
cilantro or parsley leaves

Preparation
A Golden Hen with Golden Eggs!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Clean the chicken and put it in a pot. Add oil, onion juice, cilantro juice, almonds, a clove of garlic and sufficient salt and water.

When it begins to boil gently, add vinegar, murri and basil, nabīd(date wine), citron leaves, basil, bee balm and green rue.

When it is done, add Chinese cinnamon, pepper, cinnamon, cloves and lavender. Beat with eggs yolks and cover the chicken with them.[2] Dot the platter with eggyolks and leaves[3] and serve, God willing.

It can be served in the sauce or the sauce can be thickened with 2 tbsp flour as served like gravy.



[1] The recipe calls for date wine is prescribed, which take 21 days to ferment. As dates were not in season when the recipe was made, regular table wine was used.
[2] This turns out to look like scrabbled eggs. It is advisable pre-heat the oven grill and put the chicken on a spit when half done or simply put it in a roasting pan and paint the chicken with egg yolks every five minutes while roasting until the chicken takes on a golden color.
[3] The garnish is the Medieval Spanish Chef’s addition.

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

ESPLIEGO WITH A 13TH CENTURY NOVELTY - COLD CHICKEN FOR MEMORABLE SUMMER PICNICS



Spike Lavender
Photo by: Lord-Williams
L. Lavandula spica, officinalis or vera, Eng. spike lavender (Dutch or lesser lavender). It is a native of central and Western Mediterranean basin. Spike lavender grows on rocky slopes and hills throughout the Pyrenees and some nearby mountains as in those separating Aragon, Catalonia and the ancient Kingdom of Valencia. It thrives between 600-1700 m. above sea level.

During the Middle Ages lavender was exported from Menorca, Spain to England. Spike lavender is the weakest and least pleasant of the lavender family. The fragrant leaves and purple flowers bloom in June and throughout the summer. During this time bees find the nectar flowers a good source for honey making.

In August, only the flowers and leaves they are harvested, dried and added to sachets. Perfume was made from them too. As spikenard, the flowers are used to make spike oil, an essential aromatic oil, obtained by distilling the flowers. This is used to make lavender water. The distillation process was not discovered until 1826. A cruder oil was obtained that was rubbed on the body to deter insects during the Middle Ages. Applied to insects stings, it relieves itching and inflammation. Massaging the temples with a few drops calms headaches and a five drops added to bath water alleviates muscular tension, tones up the nervous system and relaxes one for a good night’s sleep. The oil also has been placed on the forehead and pillow for the same reason. In short, it is calming, relaxing and cleansing.

Oh the lavender
Photo from: Nessy Samuel Photo
Over the ages, it has been used in local remedies to control menstruation and to induce abortion. An infusion after meals acts as a digestive and stimulant. It is used also for rheumatism, pains in the joints and as an activator for circulation when tired. It is a powerful antiseptic and helps heal burns, wounds and sores. With the exception of Elizabeth I, who drank 10 cups a day of lavender water for migraine headaches and munched on candied flowers and leaves for her sweet but rotten tooth, it did not become popular among the English until the 19th C. It is said that smelling this lavender frequently leads to long life, perhaps that too had an effect on the English queen.

In cookery, the flowers are used for flavoring vinegar, jams, sweets and cream. In main dishes, spike lavender is used with care for its dominating flavor. Too much lavender can produce and unpleasantly bitter flavor. It is too strong for breads and sweet desserts. Generally, it is recommended for grilled red meat, mutton, fish and strong cheeses. Anón Al-Andalus adds spike lavener to innumerous fowl, mutton, eggplant and cheese dishes.

On midsummer’s night eve, June 25th (which coincides with the eve of St. John’s Day), this lavender was offered to the Gods and Goddesses by strewing it on bonfires. Too, it has been burned for purification and peace. Spike lavender should not be confused this lavender with nard or spikenard, see cantueso and nardo.

[Anón/Huici.1966:73:52-53:81:57:342:189 etc; Ency Brit.1988:7:Krasnokamsk:199:1b; ES: Carroll-Mann. Nola-2. Jun 6, 02:ftn 35; Espasa. 1988:22:España:305; and Font. Plantas. 1999:455:654]

COLD CHICKEN ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN 13TH C AL-ANDALUS #81 POLLO ENFRIADO, p 57
For 4 persons

Ingredients

1 chicken[1]
¼ tsp salt
¼ tsp white pepper
¼ c almonds
6 eggs
¼ c whole pine kernels
½ tsp cinnamon
½ tsp cassia
1 tsp ginger scrapings
1 tsp ground lavender
1 tsp murri[2]
3 tbsp olive oil

Garnish:

¼ tsp white pepper
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tbsp rue leaves
4 hard boiled egg yolks


Cold Chicken
A Novelty for Summer Picnics
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Wash the chicken, clean it and sprinkle it with salt and pepper; put it in a pot and cover it with chopped almonds. Add six eggs, whole pine kernels, white pepper, cinnamon, cassia, ginger, lavender and murri; mix all well and add olive oil and about 2 c water.

Place it on the hearth. Simmer until cooked. Slice it and put it on a platter and sprinkle it with white pepper ad cinnamon. Chop rue and sprinkle that over it. Garnish with cooked egg yolks and serve. 

[1] 1 whole chicken breast was used as it is enough for 4 persons
[2] See blog titled almorí published August 25, 2011.




Monday, May 19, 2014

ESPITO DE URZ WITH 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR LAMB AND EGG SAUSAGE

The Twig
Photo from: Rachel Lim
sharp twig of broom formerly used to pierce sausage. Today pins or thin nails are used. [Ares. “Comidas.” 1994:96; and Pers. Memories. Slaughters Mostoles. 2000:2001:2003]

RECIPE FOR WHITE TAFÂYÂ WHICH IS ANOTHER KIND ADAPTED FROM HUCCI'S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS, #135 RECETA DE TAFÂYÂ: ES OTRA CLASE, pp 92-93


Ingredients 

1 lb lamb
2 tbsp onion juice
Pricking the Sausage to Prevent Explosion
(Note the white of the eggs
and the brown of the ground meat
making this sausage unique)
Photo by: Lord-Williams
½ tsp salt
1 tsp coriander
¼ tsp pepper
1 large intestine
10- 12 hard boiled eggs
olive oil for frying
1vbeaten egg
¼ -½ c split almonds

Garnish:
½ tsp cinnamon
1 tbsp lavender

Optional:

½ - 1 c cilantro or mint water

Preparation

Grind meat from a young, tender lamb. Grate an onion to obtain the juice. Then chop the rest of the onion and mix this with the meat, salt, coriander and pepper. Divide the meat in half. Make meatballs with one half of the meat.

Put them in a pot with salt, coriander, pepper, a little onion juice and oil. Heat it enough to seal the meat. Then add water to cook all a little.

Unique for the Hard Boiled Eggs
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Clean a fat intestine and tie it at one end.  Peel a hard-boiled eggs and stuff one it into the intestine. Then about 1 ½ oz of meat then another hard-boiled egg followed by more meat. Continue alternating eggs with the meat until the intestine is full. Then tie it, prick it several times with a broom twig[1] and put it in a pot filled with boiling water and cook for ½ hr.

When done, brown the sausage in a frying pan with oil. If desired, the sausage can be coated raw eggs beaten and then fried.  Fry the remaining meatballs and the almonds. When done, chop the almonds.

Slice the sausage and place the pieces in a bowl. Decorate it with meatballs and chopped almonds. Sprinkle with cinnamon and lavender and serve it. If desired, the dish can be colored by putting cilantro or mint in 1 c water in a food grinder. Grind it and then strain it and pour as much as one likes over the dish.

NOTE: This dish is rather dry without a sauce. A mint sauce to enhance the lamb is recommended. The Medieval Spanish Chef’s recipe is:

Ingredients

1 ½ c wine vinegar
½  c sugar
½ c chopped fresh mint leaves

Preparation

Heat sugar and vinegar in a pan. Bring to a boil and reduce heat. Simmer until the liquid is reduced to half (about 10 minutes).

Remove from heat and cool for about 5 minutes. Add mint leaves. Cover and let sit for one hour while the mint flavor becomes infused in the syrup. Serve at room temperature.



[1] This is the Medieval Spanish Chef’s addition, as the scribe must have forgotten that the sausage must be pricked or it will explode. Pins can be used but if a sprig of broom is available do use it.