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Monday, October 12, 2015

LEBRILLO WITH CHICKEN WITH MUSTARD RECIPE

Lebrillo
Photo from: Romanus too
OCast librillo, Eng 1. Eng an earthenware, metal or stone basin, vessel, recipient, vase, pot; a container with a high border wider than the base, which can be filed with water to wash oneself or to wash clothing, food or other articles. The Archpriest of Hita describes washing every object in the kitchen of Madame Lent on Ash Wednesday including the lebrillo. 2. a stone washing and rinsing tub. 3. Ast. wine measure of a little more than one arroba (32 pints).

[Anón/Huici. 1965:237:142; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:33 and Ruíz/Brey. 1965:1174d]

CHICKEN WITH MUSTARD IN AN EARTHENWARE BOWL ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #237 HECHURA DE GALLINA EN LEBRILLO CON MOSTAZA, p 142[1]

Ingredients

Step 1

Portrait of a Hen
Photo from: hapsnaps

1 hen
salt to taste
1 onion mashed
12 sprigs fresh cilantro chopped
¼ c olive oil
½ tsp white pepper ground
1 tsp caraway

Step 2

1 c cilantro juice
½ vinegar

1 tbsp murri[2]

Step 3

½ c peeled and ground almonds
1 slightly beaten egg
¼ tsp white pepper
6 sprigs fresh cilantro chopped
1 tsp coriander ground
1 tsp ground
 mustard seed[3]

Step 4

3 eggs

Preparation

A Dainty Dish for a King
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Step 1

Chop up the hen and put it in a pot with the remaining ingredients in Step one and bring to a boil. Let it boil gently for a few minutes.

Step 2

Mix the ingredients in step 2 and add them to the pot.

Step 3

When the chicken is cooked, mix the ingredients in Step 3 and add them to the pot.

Step 4

Break the 3 eggs over the pot. Remove it from heat and leave it on the hearth to rest 15-20 minutes before serving, god willing.


[1] See blogs titled Galeno, published Jan 10, ’14 and gota published December 17, ’14 for different interpretations of this recipe.

[2] See blog titled almorí published August 25, 2011 for recipe.
[3] The text directly translated means “prepared mustard,” which cannot be because the process of grinding mustard is not the same as today. The grinding process nowadays is a 19th century discovery. Mustard in this case, would be the equivalent of grinding mustard seed in a food grinder in the humble opinion of The Medieval Spanish Chef. It did turn out to be very tasty.




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