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Wednesday, September 30, 2015

LASOS WITH 16TH CENTURY CINNAMON-FRUIT ROLL RECIPE

lasos, 1. tortillon, L. tortilis, It tortiglione, Eng. twisted or winding pastry or pasta. 2. hemp nets used to ensnare prey. 3. ties between ethnic groups, families etc. [ES: Carroll-Mann. Glossary.  Jun 16, 04; and Hita/Brey. 1965:746c:131]
 
SPANISH CINNAMON-FRUIT ROLLS, DAVID FREIDMAN’S ADAPTION OF BRIGHID NI   CHIARAIN  (ROBIN CARROLL-MANN'S) TRANSLATION OF  DIEGO GRANADO’S, LIBRO DEL ARTE DE COCINA (1599) PARA HAZER DIUERSOS TORTILLONES OJALDRADOS Y POR 
OJALDRAR RELENOS Y VAZIOS Para hacer torillon relleno, p 149-150  
[SC fd-Spain-msg – 9/27/13]

Ingredients (half the original):

dough:
3 ½ c flour = 1 lb
¼  c butter = 2 oz
3 egg yolks
2 tbsp rose water = 1 oz
1 scant tbsp dried yeast (1 package)
⅝ c lukewarm water
1 tsp salt

filling:
½lb = 1 ¾ c currents
½lb = 1 ¾ c chopped dates
1 ½ c wine
2 tbsp sugar
¼ tsp cinnamon
⅛ + tsp nutmeg
1/16 tsp cloves

to use in making loaf:
¼ c sugar
½ oz cinnamon (I need to measure how much volume this is)
1 tbsp butter
~ 2 tbsp melted butter
½ tsp rosewater
½ tbsp sugar

Note that most of the quantities are specified in the original recipe.

Preparation

Mix flour and salt in a large bowl; mix yeast with warm water, beat
egg yolks with rosewater, melt ¼c butter. Make a well in the
center of the flour and pour the liquids into it, stir together with
a wooden spoon, then knead for half an hour (!). Let rise an hour and
20 minutes.

To prepare filling, bring wine to a boil, add currents
and dates and let boil two minutes; drain and add 2 tbsp sugar and
spices.

When dough has risen, pinch off about an eighth of it and
spread it out flat in the bottom of a greased 8"x 8" pan; spread ½
tsp melted butter over it. Spread the rest of the dough out on a
floured board to a rectangle 8"x15" (I did 7"x 11" and it wasn't big
enough), spread with 1 tsp melted butter, and sprinkle on ¼ c sugar
and ½ oz cinnamon. Spread the filling on top of that; dot with 1 tbsp
of butter in pieces. Roll up and pinch together to seal, so that the
filling won't all ooze out. Put on top of the piece of dough in the
pan and spread another 1 tsp of melted butter over the top. Let rise
another 10 minutes or so.

PREHEAT OVEN AT 350ºF/175ºC

Bake 45 minutes or so, taking out halfway through to spread with another 1 tsp
melted butter. After 40 minutes baking, sprinkle with rosewater and
sugar, then put back for another 5 minutes.

Friedman’s Comments: good.  Too much filling per amount of dough for my taste,
but that's what the recipe says. The piece of dough it is put on
becomes part of the loaf, rather than remaining behind in the pan. I
rolled this up as I do cinnamon bread, and it didn't really fit the
description: didn't twist by itself until it becomes like a snail; I
can't make much sense of this. Anyone have any suggestions?

Next time: do full recipe; knead for less time and compare resulting
texture to see if the full half hour is really necessary; try rolling
from the side of the rectangle rather than the end to see if I can
get it more snail-like that way--maybe roll tighter ("more closed")

at one end than at the other. Get volume measure on cinnamon.


Monday, September 28, 2015

LARGUEZA

Meat on a Sword in
Saslik Russian restuarant, Helsinki
Photo from Cory Doctorow
generosity. Kings and nobles during the Middle Ages were characteristically generous in feeding their subjects especially between the 12C -15 C. Spaniards and English like Henry IV of Castile, Edward IV of England, Juan Pacheco Castile’s Marques of Villena, Richard Neville, England‘s Earl of Warwick and Miquel Lucas Iranzo, Constable of Castile, spent vast amounts on food. In the Neville household all the guests were invited to carry away as much meat that would fit on their swords. [Castro. Alimentación.1996:78; and Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:146]




Friday, September 25, 2015

LARGUERO (Leon) WITH 14TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR CHICKPEAS



A Platter of Chickpeas with Broth Dark Broth on the Side
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Leon. larguiero, O Cast fuente alargado, Eng. a long earthenware or other platter for serving chickpeas separately from cocido. After the serving the platter is not removed from the table, but left for nibbling. Ibn Razīn points out that “jofaina,” a large round earthenware bowl, could be used, see alfajana. Also see cocido and cocido maragato. [Ares. “Comidas.” 1994:86; ES: Palabreru. Mar 21, 04; and Ibn Razīn/Marín. 2007:280]

ANOTHER RECIPE FOR CHICKPEAS ADAPTED FROM IBN RAZĪN/MARÍN, RELIEVES DE LAS MESAS, ACERCA DE LAS DELICIAS DE LA COMIDA Y LOS DIFERENTE PLATOS, Capítulo Segundo, sobre los platos de garbanzos 3. OTRA RECETA, p 280

The "larguero" a Day Later
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

1 c chickpeas
½ tsp salt
½ tsp white pepper
1 tsp shredded ginger

Preparation

Clean dried chickpeas and wash them. Let soak in enough water to cover them. Leave them over night. The next day put them in a pot with the water used to soak them and boil until tender. When done add salt, pepper and ginger. Drink the broth which is beneficial, especially when dark. Chickpeas are eaten to soften one personality; if eaten often they are fattening.











Wednesday, September 23, 2015

LARGO WITH BAKED FISH STUFFED WITH SUMAC

Mullet Slit Up One Side and Stuffed
Photo by: Lord-Williams

largo, -a, largos, -as,  OCast luengo, -a, luengas, -os,Cat. lonc, llong, lonça, Eng. long, lavish, sharp, smart, lengthwise. Villena instructs that trout and many other foods should be carved lengthwise. [Anón/Grewe 1982:CXXV:148; Berceo. Libro. 1983:272:2565; Diccionari Catalá. 1980:7:LLI:48; Nola. 1989:xxv-2; Nola/Iranzo. 1982:170; and Villena/Calero. 2002:38a-38b:41a

BAKED FISH STUFFED WITH SUMAC MIX (SAMAK MASHWI BIL-SUMMAQ)[1]

This recipe is adapted from the thirteenth-century Baghdadi cookbook. Originally fish is to be backed in a tannour, but the regular oven will do the job just fine. Although the recipe calls for a whole fish, which would be a nice thing to have, I sometimes use a whole tail part of a medium to big salmon, slash the skin and fill it and tie in the way I normally do with a whole fish.

Ingredients

Brad Pitt Crying for Stuffed Fish!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
2 ½-3 lbs whole fish such as a small salmon or 2 big trouts[2], butterflied. Keep skin and make 2-3 diagonal slashed on the outer skin on both sides
2 tbsp oil
½ tsp turmeric

For the stuffing:

½ c sumac[3]
¼ c za’tar or thyme[4]
½ tsp coriander, cumin, cinnamon, each, optional
4 cloves garlic, grated
½ c toasted walnut, chopped
2 tbsp oil
½ tsp salt
About 3 tbsp water

PREHEAT OVEN TO 450º F/230ºC

1.     Rub fish with oil and turmeric inside and out.
2.     Mix stuffing ingredients, it should have a paste-like consistency. Add a little water if needed. Fill the inside of the fish with it. Secure the fish closed with kitchen thread or wooden picks.
Sumac, an Interesting Ingredient for Filling
Photo by: 
3.     Put in a greased baking sheet and bake in a preheated oven at 450º F for about 20 minutes or until flesh is flaky when poked with a fork, and skin is nicely browned. (Cooking time depends on how thick and big the fish is.)  



[1] From Nawal Nasrallah’s Delights from the Garden of Eden, p. 388.
[2] Mullet was used.
[3] Sumac is a red, tart Berry of a bush that has been growing wild, and has been used in the middle East ever since ancient times. It should not be confused with the poisonous sumac trees of North America. The berries are dried and used whole or ground as a seasoning or a souring agent. Only the husk is used, though, for the seed are too hard toe at. Sumac is not prized for its aroma as much as for the fruity and pleasantly sour taste, believed to have the power to enhance and excite the appetites. It is not well known in the West, and is only available in Middle Eastern shops. Ground sumac husk is tossed with raw sliced onions, and is especially good in meat dishes like Kebab and Kufta. When sumac is used as a souring agent instead of lemon juice, while who berries are used. They are cracked and soaked in hot water for 30 minutes, then strained very well. The resulting reddish juice will be added to the dish, and strained berries are discarded. Sumac is also an important ingredient in Za’tar.
[4] Za’tar is an ancient herb. it was known in the ancient Akkadian language as “zateru” from which the Arabic word was derived. za’tar os thyme, but it is also a blend the components of which are dried thyme, sumac, toasted sesame seeds and salt. This blend is often sprinkled on drained yogurt, meat dishes, vegetables, or used as a dip. It is sometimes mixed with olive oil and spread on bread before baking. I especially like to sprinkle it on my tossed salad. The proportions for making it vary from place to place or even from family to family. The following is an acceptable standard:
            Two parts sesame seeds
            One part ground dried thyme
            One part ground sumac
            A sash of salt
Dry toast sesame seeds in a skillet or in the oven. Stir frequently since sesame tends to burn quickly. Allow it to cool completely, then mix it with the rest of the ingredients. Keep mixture in an airtight container. It stays fresh longer if kept in the freezer.