Entradas populares

Friday, March 11, 2016

MANOS, COMER CON WITH 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR MEATBALLS.

The Art of Eating with 3 Fingers
with Stones on Rings to Ward off Evils on the other 2 Fingers
Photo by: Lord-Williams
to eat with the fingers. Although criticized after the 17th C when the fork replaced fingers, there was an art to eating with the fingers during the Middle Ages. Solids were place in the mouth with three fingers only, the thumb, index and middle fingers. This custom was called “a la morisica” or the Moorish way, the vogue at that time. The other two fingers had to be separated for the rings were worn on the ring and baby fingers. As many as four could be worn under the lower joint and the second joint. The rings contained precious stones with magical powers that eliminated evil from various food items and diabolical powers against evildoers and spirits. Each precious stone contained a virtue against a specific type of poison in food, disagreeable incidents pertaining to the meal and infected air.

Among stones worn were the ruby, diamond, coral, jacinth, carnelian, and granite. The Grand Chamberlain wore one which changed color when someone in his presence told a lie. Two classes of stones were thought essential for eating, cold stones including the diamond, which worked against evils in warm foods such as meat and blood; and warm stones, like the garnet for cold foods. See bezoar,
coral, diamante, galacio, gigorza, granite, lapidario, pedernal, rubí, serpentina, and unicornio. [Alonso Luengo. 1994:44; and Villena/Calero. 2002:16]

RECIPE FOR MEATBALLS[1] USED IN SOME DISHES, SUCH AS TAFÂYÂ, JIMLI, AND OTHERS ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS, 140 RECETA DE LAS ALBÓNDIGAS USADAS EN ALGUNOS PLATOS, COMO LA “TAFĀYĀ, ŶIMLĪ Y OTROS

Ingredients

Preparing Meatballs for Frying
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 lb ground lamb
1 tbsp oil
½ tsp pepper
1 tsp cinnamon or lavender
onion juice from half an onion
salt to taste
1 egg
flour

For frying meatballs, as per recipe #4

¼ c virgin olive oil
1 tbsp vinegar
1 garlic clove crushed
½ tsp saffron mashed
½ tsp cumin

Raisin drink, which could be a sauce for the meatballs:
½ c raisins
½ c honey


Preparation

This is a nourishing dish, easy to digest, fortifying and good for thin persons, the aged and weak stomachs.


Remove meat from the shoulder and the leg of mutton. Remove tendons or veins. Grind it. Mix it with oil, pepper, cinnamon or lavender, a little onion juice, salt, egg and egg. (Make meat balls and[2]) roll them in flour.

Delicious Meatballs Dipped in the Sauce with
Three Fingers with Care not to Spill Food on Rings
Photo by: Lord-Williams
The recipe does not explain how to cook the meatballs. As per recipe #4 instructions heat a frying pan and add ingredients for frying. Add meatballs and fry until done.

Perry claims there is a “break here: following dish is for a raisin drink.” There is no break and raisins are not mentioned. The literal translation of Huici’s text is:_

Clean pure oil of its twigs and impurities and was it with water until it is clean; if it pleased you for each measure of oil add two measures of hot water and put it in an earthenware pot and heat until it boils; then clarify it and add honey. If you want it cooked, put one measure of oil and three of water and measure it with a stick; later add water to the pot if desired, until it reaches the measure marked, then clarify it and add honey and let it boil and after that drink it if it is God’s will and the same with the honey cooked fir drinking it in this way.

Perry’s translation reads:

“And clean sweet raisins of twigs and dirt and wash them with water until they are clean. If you like it infused, throw into each kail of them two parts of hot water and put in a clay vessel until it boils; then strain and throw in it [p. 26, recto] honey. And if you like it cooked, place one part of raisins with three of water and take the measure with a stick, then add to the pot as much water as you wish, cook it until it returns to the measuring mark, then strain it and throw in honey and leave it until it boils, and then drink it, God willing. And in the same manner honey is cooked for drinking.”

If Perry’s recipe is used as a sauce, boil raisins in honey. Skim honey and serve hot with meatballs to be dipped into the sauce.

This dish should be eaten using the index finger and thumb as explained above.



[1] Huici and Perry state that the author repeats here almost verbatim the recipe he gave at the start. That would be recipe #4, which is more complicated. See blogs titled comino published May 27, 2013 and fuego lento September 15, 2014 for the Medieval Spanish Chef’s adaptions of recipe 4.
[2] This is not stated in the text.


No comments:

Post a Comment