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Monday, July 25, 2016

MIRABOLÁN WITH A MEDIEVAL FORERUNNER OF CHERRY CRISP

Cherry plum/Prunus cerasifera
Photo from: Ewa
mirabalonoL. Prunus cerasifera (five species: myrobalana, bellerica, citrina, embilicos, indica), Ar. hîlaj,  OEng chiryse, cheryes, ceriseEng. cherry, myrobalan plum, cherry-plum. The tree is a native the Balkans and central Asia. It grows to 15-25’ in height and 15-20’ in width. It has purple leaves. The pinkish white flowers bloom in April. It produces a bland plum-like fruit that is 1” long, oval and meaty, with pit containing a stone.

Formerly these plums were used medically as an unguent or balsam for gout, as a laxative and to beautify the color of the cutis. Further, they were consumed to fortify the internal members, to arouse the senses, to create good feelings and to ward off melancholy.

Cherry plums
Photo from: collateral and incompatible
Citrina was used to purge cholera and to clarify the eyesight. Bellerica was consumed to purge phylem and reduce fever. Indus cured melancholy and severe cholera. It was thought good for leprosy and quatrain patients. Embilicos were eaten to purge the phylem and to comfort the brain. The Anón Al-Andalus provides two recipes for medicines using cherry-plums. One is for ringworm and jaundice and the other is a medicinal powder to clear the head and lungs of phlegm. (It is called for a third time as an ingredient for fish pie.) Perry, however, insinuates that this could be a transcription error but this fruit was used as a purgatory.

Today cherry-plums are consumed sparingly to alleviate some cancers. Eating too many can be fatal. They are used for tanning, dyeing and ink. 

[Anón/Huici.1966:144:97-98:513:279: 537:291; Alimentación. 1996:301-302; Curye/Hieatt. 1985:vi 59: 77 i:54 iii 33; and ES: Anon/Perry. Sep 5 00:Ftn 60]

MEDIEVAL ENGLISH CHERRY COBBLER ADAPTED FROM HIEATT AND BUTLER'S CURYE ON INGLYSCH VI 59 CHYRSE OR CHERRY POTTAGE, p 110
The bottom layer of Almond Milk and Cherries
(note - it was not necessary to grease and flour the pie dish)
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Ingredients


½ c almonds
2 c broth
2 c cheeries stones removed or 1 (21) oz can cherry pie filling (not strained)
4 tbsp sugar[1]
1 ½ c breadcrumbs
salt to taste
1 tsp red sanders[2]

Garnish
ground anise

Preparation

Baked Cherry Pottage
Photo by: Lord-Williams
PREHEAT OVER TO 350ºF/175ºC

Peel almonds. Grind in food processor. Add broth grind again. Strain through a cheesecloth. 

Put the almond milk back into the food processor. Mix all the cherries with sugar. Add  part cherries and grind together with the almond milk. 

Pour this into a 9" pie dish. Cover with a layer of breadcrumbs. Cover this with the remainder of whole cherries and sprinkle with anise. 

Bake for ½ hour.


[1] The Medieval Spanish Chef's addition. Perhaps the originally recipe does not call for sugar due to the unavailability at that time.
[2] for color, which was not included for lack thereof but saffron or food coloring, today, could be a substitute but the Medieval Spanish Chef preferred the contrast of the white breadcrumbs with the red cherries.


CURYE/HIEATT VI 



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