Entradas populares

Monday, September 26, 2016

MOZÁRABE WITH A 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR QUINCE COOKED WITH MEAT

Skinning and Chopping Boiled Quince
A Food Item of 3 Religions
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Hisp. Ar. musta’rabu, Ar. musta’rab, Spanish Christians, who maintained their religion, paid tributes to the Arabs and lived under their rule. Until the 11th C. it was believed that the Koran granted this right to Christians. Further, the administrative and judicial organization of the Roman Church church was maintained. Jews were allowed to keep their religion too.

From the 9th century until the 11th century, Cordoba was the most splendid capital of the world. It outshined Baghdad in architecture, agriculture, economy, education, cuisine and all other aspects. Mozarabes adapted the mixture of the Bagdad and North African cuisines from the Muslims dominating Cordoba. It seems to have been so intertwined that only a few recipes titled “Jewish” were recorded. It is, therefore, assumed that the recipes found in existing Muslim culinary manuscripts in Spain could be part of the gastronomy of all three creeds.   

[Benavides-Barajas. Nueva-Clásica. 1995:11; and RAE Dict 2001:1048]

A QUINCE DISH ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #225 HECHURA DE MEMBRILLO, p 137


Ingredients

A dish that captures medieval love for color
Photo by: Lord-Wiliams
1 lb meat
2 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp vinegar
1 tsp[1] each of pepper, caraway, coriander seed and pounded onion
3-5 quinces
2-3 eggs

Garnish

pepper
saffron

Preparation

Chop the meat into cubes. Brown it in oil. Add vinegar, pepper, caraway and coriander seed. Put an onion in a food processor and grind. Pour the juice and the onion into the pot. Then cover with water, bring to a boil and simmer ½ hour or until the meat is tender.

Boil 3-5 quinces (depending on size) in water. When soft remove from water and let cool. Remove skin and cut into junks, removing the core and seeds.

When the meat is done, add the quince and bring it to the boil two or three times. Slightly beat eggs and pour them over the top of the meat and quince mixture. Turn off heat and cover the pot. Let sit until the eggs have solidified.

Garnish by sprinkling it with white pepper and mashed and dissolved saffron.


[1] The recipe calls for 1 dirham. Perry, Charles. “Description.” 2001:287. “The dirham . . .  could weigh from 2.82 to 3.125 grams. Let us say 3 grams.” Four and ½ grams equals 0.9 teaspoons.

ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #225




No comments:

Post a Comment