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Wednesday, November 30, 2016

OLIVO WITH 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR FRIED LAMB

harvesting olive trees
Photo from: dimitris kapsalis 
olive tree. This was introduced by the 8th C BC into Spain with the grape vine by the Phoenicians. It existed in Murcia and Andalusia but not in northern Spain. There were few in Castile until the 14th C. The Arabs augmented the number of olive grooves during their occupation of southern Spain between 711-1492. Don Quijote talks about the "echos" of the Andalusian olive trees. See aceituna and aceite de olivo. [Castro. Alimentación. 1996:238; and Cervantes. 1947:CH XIII]
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ANOTHER  DISH FRIED IN A PAN ADAPTED FROM MARIN’S TRANSLATION OF IBN RAZĪN’S FADALAT, SEC 2, 
CH 2, #24 OTRO PLATO FRITO EN LA OLLA, p 164  
  
Boiling Lamb
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Ingredients

2 lbs lamb with fat and suet
salt to taste

1 tbsp olive oil
½ tsp white pepper
1 tbsp ginger

1 tsp coriander
2 medium onions

1 tsp murri 
enough water to cover


Fried Lamb Garnished with Herbs and a Slice of  Orange
With Lime and Vinegar Sauce
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Garish:

½c lime and vinegar or other citrus fruit or other fresh acid juice

Preparation

Select fatty lamb meat with suet. Cut selected pieces, wash and place the meat in a pan with the rest of the ingredients. Slow bring to a boil uncovered. Reduce heat and simmer until liquid evaporated. Turn meat to brown on all sides. Remove from heat and serve in a platter. 

Pour lime vinegar or juice over the meat before serving.

Enjoy,if it be the almighty Gods will.


MARIN’S TRANSLATION
OF IBN RAZĪN’S FADALAT, SEC 2, CH 2, 
#24 OTRO PLATO FRITO EN LA OLLA, p 164    






Monday, November 28, 2016

OFCIOS DE LA BOCA WITH 14TH CENTURY SAUCE FOR RABBITS ON A SPIT

Roasted Pig
(with modern day "knaves" turning spit)
Photo from: Maunalio Ranc
h
“jobs of the mouth,” royal kitchen staff under the orders of the cook. This consisted of knaves and young girls who had specific duties such as turning the spit, washing the pots and pans and daubing roasts with batter when food was prepared for the king and/or royalty. See cocina de boca. [ES: Gázquez. “Oficios”. Sep 6, 04]

ANOTHER WAY OF MAKING A SAUCE FOR RABBITS OR HARES ON A SPIT LXXVII ADAPTED FROM GREWE’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN SENT SOVÍ #LXXVII QUI PARLA CON FFARETS A CONILS AN AST SALSA, p 115

Ingredients

rabbits
Chicken was used as rabbit was not available
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Sauce:
1 slice toasted bread
¼ c vinegar
1  liver
¼ tsp pepper
rabbit juice
¼  wine

Preparation

Select the rabbits, as per the number of diners. Wash the rabbits and secure them on a spit over the fire with a pan underneath to catch the drippings. At this point a knave would begin turning the spit and daubing the rabbits with the drippings to prevent burning. 

In the meantime, make a sauce with toast soaked in ¼ c vinegar, liver and pepper. Chop all.

Add the rest of the vinegar and wine. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and stir until the sauce thickens.

When the rabbits are roasted, carve them and arrange the meat on a wooden cutting board and serve the sauce in a gravy boat. 


GREWE’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN SENT SOVÍ 
#LXXVII QUI PARLA CON FFARETS A CONILS AN AST SALSA, p 115









Friday, November 25, 2016

OCA WITH 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR STUFFED GOOSE

Goose
Photo from: Lisa Howard
L. Anser (gray geese), L. Brania (black geese), OCat hoque, Eng. goose. These are northern hemisphere birds grow to a size between swans and ducks. They can swim but their relatives outdo them in the water.


One of the most splendid sights in Spain takes place on an autumn night overlooking a pond with an island and a full moon overhead. Suddenly, out of nowhere in the sky a flock of geese appear flying in a straight line. Then they seem to circle the moon as if perfecting French 18th C. naval maneuvers and shoot down to the island as if they spotted the grain from the stars above.

Actually, the farmer has placed food there for this reason. If they like their environs, they will stay. By Easter, they will have made huge nests on the ground and laid 3-12 big rough white eggs of which they are very jealous. If a human approaches, the gander keeping guard will honk furiously at them as if to say, “don’t go near.” This advises his life-long mate who places herself in front of the nest ready to peck any curious observer who comes too close. It takes 24-33 days for the goslings to hatch.


Since Roman times, shepherds have put out feed for geese to ultimately make exquisite pates from their livers but the recipes were lost after their downfall until the Arabs brought them back to Spain.


Geese are roasted stuffed with their livers, herbs, spices and garums. Mozarabs, Mudejars and Muladies borrowed Persian recipes for stewing geese in pots with fresh fruits like small pears or mountain ash berries. Anon Al-Andalus provides two recipes specifically for stuffed goose. One is roasted and the other is boiled. Another recipe for lamb consists of stuffing it with a goose stuffed with a hen stuffed with a pigeon stuffed with a thrush stuffed with a small bird.

[Anón/Huici.1966:29:29-30:105:72-73:229:139; Benavides-Barajas. Nueva-Clásica. 1995:199-200; Ency Brit. 1998:5:Freon:364;2a; Nola. 1989:xxiii-2; and Pers. Memories, Mostales. 1998]


For Al-Andalus recipe #105 goose recipe see blog titled ánsar published October 17, 2011.

STUFFED GOOSE ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #229 HECHURA DE OCA RELLENA, p 139



Ingredients


Goose in Grease with Pomegranates
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 goose with entails[1] 
1 chicken liver
1 tbsp freshly chopped basil
½ tsp pepper
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tbsp coriander
1 tsp mashed cilantro seed
1 tbsp fresh thyme
2 tbsp vinegar
2 tsp murri
1 raw egg
salt to taste
1 small onion

Garnish

lemon or orange leaves or at will

Preparation

Clean a tender goose and leave it whole. Boil the gizzard and chop it with the liver and a chicken liver.  Beat with with pepper, cinnamon, coriander and cilantro, chopped thyme and a little vinegar,  1 tsp murri, egg, salt and mashed onion; bring it to a boil. Stuff the goose with this mixture. Put it in a pot and add a little water and oil. 


PREHEAT OVEN TO 200ºC/400ºF


Roast until the breast is toasted. Then turn it over and toast the other side. 


When done, put it on a platter and garnish with tender lemon or orange leaves chopped or at will. Pour the grease over the goose and present it, if God so wished.
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[1] Chicken was used for lack thereof.

HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS 
#229 HECHURA DE OCA RELLENA, p 139




Wednesday, November 23, 2016

OBLEAS, WAFERS


Ready made Wafer 8" diameter
Photo by: Lord-Williams
barquillos, hostias, OCast canutillos de suplicaciones, suplicaciones, OCat neules, nelles, Cat nuela, MEng obleys, wafrouns, nelles, nueles, hosties, cialdone, cublies, warfurs, waftron, waste, Eng obleys, wafers used for communion or as sweets like cookies. It appears that the word obleys came into existence from the Greek word meaning a sacrificial cake to the gods. With Christianity it came to be either daily bread or with time a special bread to represent the body of Christ.

After the Norman invasions the Dutch word wafel, corrupted to wafer came to replace the Middle English word, while the Spanish equivalent was corrupted with deviations. Some are defined as nueles, flat round cakes, without yeast and others are described as being rectangles like clothes covering coffins.

Later, they were rolled like barquillos (little boats or cigars) while still warm from the irons or oven as those prescribed by the physician for Sancho Panza in Don Quixote called canutillos de suplicaciones, later day barquillos to improve his health.

Whether obleys or wafers, etc they consist of a thin batter made with unleavened flour and water and browned in irons or baked. The first known recipe in England was published in the Harleian S 279, thought to be from about 1430 in which P. Troy believes the recipe calls for a gelatin extracted from pike and a soft cheese added to the usual batter of flour, egg whites (or whole eggs or orange or rose water) and flavored with sugar and ginger. Other flavorings could be anise seeds, lemon peel and today vanilla.

Sent Soví uses obleys in pigeon soppes and in a Lenten dish of fish and leeks. In Forme of Curye, they are used with rabbit if lasagna noodles are not available. When not in stews or soppes, wafers could be sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar, covered with jam and topped with another wafer as macaroons (Sp alforjas). They could serve as the bottoms of tarts, turron, or marzipan as Nola describes. There were several ways of preparing them and ingredients vary.

Constable Miguel Lucas Iranzo offered them as a snack to Henry IV of Castile during Lent of 1464 (when egg consumption was prohibited) with fruit, wine, bread and preserves. Sass explains that traditionally they were served with hippocras at the end of banquets. They were favorite snacks and after dinner sweets from the times of Edward III of England through the Elizabethan period when the Royal Courts maintained the Wafery as a separate department from the Bakery. It could be a room near the hall or in a separate building.

Wafer Rolls
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Apprentices of guild members sold them on the streets from the 13th C until the 1920’s in most European countries. Today Spanish eat wafer rolls which are are rolled and baked to accompany ice cream and puddings.

2. gum or flour and water used to seal envelopes and documents. This was colored to prevent people from eating it.

[Anón/Grewe. 1982:36:XXXXIII:86 ftn 6:CLXXXX:198:ftn 9; Austin. 1964:279:xxiv:38; Castro. Alimentación. 1996:262; Cervantes. 1947:775:ftn 20:1798; Clair. 1964:60; Curye. 1985:26:VI:103:203; ES: Troy. “Obleys” Jun 16, 07; Nola. 1989:xxxiiii-4; Nola/Pérez. 1992:203; and Sass. 1975:32]

See blog title “Combinan,”  published May 13, 2013, for Nola’s recipe for wafers.

Monday, November 21, 2016

OBISPILLO WITH 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR OVEN ROASTED STUFFED CHICKEN

Coccyx of a Chicken
Photo by: Lord-Williaams
1. coccyx of fowl, Pope’s nose. Still it is thought to be the tastiest part of fowl. Peacocks and geese’s were savored for their large size. Villena instructs that peacocks and similar fowl should be finely sliced but those of smaller fowl like hens should be left whole. 

2. a big black pudding. It consists of a large blood sausage made at the time of the slaughter. It consists of coagulated blood from a pig, sheep o cow. It is mixed with fat, rice or onions and spices. It can be eaten raw or coasted. It is a typical breakfast item in England where it the sausage contains oats and barley instead of onions or rice.  
3. boy-bishop, little bishop. 

[Nola/Iranzo. 1982:170; Nola/Pérez. 1994:62:203; and Villena/Calero. 2002:22a:25a:26a

OVEN ROASTED STUFFED CHICKEN ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #109 PLATO DE GALLINA RELLENA AL HORNO, p 75

Ingredients

A Beautiful Beast
Photo by: Lord-Williams
For Stuffing:
1 chicken deboned
entails from two chickens
10 hard boiled egg yolks
salt to taste
spices such as 1 tsp cinnamon, ½ tsp cloves, ½tsp nutmeg
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½ pepper
3 tbsp olive oil (not needed today)

1 whole chicken

Garnish
6 egg yolks
rue or other herb
powdered spices

Debone chicken and grind. Add entails and hard boiled egg yolks. Mix with salt, spices, pepper and oil.

Select a very large chicken and stuff with the ground chicke mixture.

PREHEAT OVEN TO 400ª F/200! C

Delicious Sliced Chicken & Stuffing
Decorated with Egg Yolks and
Garnished with Thyme
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Roast chicken for 45 minutes or until browned on the top side. Turn and roast upside down 30 minutes or until browned.

Turn top side up and dot with raw egg yolks. Turn off heat and let sit until yolks are set.

Remove from the oven and carve. Garnish with cooked egg yolks, herbs and spices.

HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS 
#109 PLATO DE GALLINA RELLENA AL HORNO, p 75







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