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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

PAJERERO WITH SAUCE FOR GEESE ETC


Roadrunner box trap
Photo from: Sam
OCast paxarero, Eng. n. bird catcher, bird fancier, very large bird cage. During medieval times, only nobility was permitted to practice the art of hunting, especially large game, on their estates. Peasant did hunt small game on the Iberian peninsula as the Archpriest of Hita points out. He relates that peasant hunters planted hemp to later make rope and nets from it to catch flightless or terrestrial birds, such as peacocks, ostriches, francolins, roadrunners and certain species of ducks, pigeons and doves.

adj. merry, gay.

[Anón/Grewe: 1979:XXV:76-77: CXXXIII:155: CXXXVIII:158 etc; Anón/Huici. 1965: 2:19; 30:30-31;52:41etc; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:224-225; Nola. 1989:xxx-2:xxx-3:xl-1 etc and Ruíz/Saínz.1986:752:139]

For some recipes see: blog titled cortar published August 9, 2013 which gives a 13th century recipe for roasted hare and blog titled dornillo published January 14, 2015


Garlic and Raisin Stuffing
Photo by: Lord-Williams
SAUCE FOR GEESE, CAPONS, HENS, PIGEONS AND PHEASANTS  ADAPTED FROM ANÓN/GREWE SENT SOVÍ, CXXXIII QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FFER EN ALCELS MENUTS ALIDEM, p 155

Ingredients

1 head of garlic
½ c raisins
1 bird such a goose, capon, hen, pigeon or a pheasant
salt to taste

for the sauce:
2 chicken livers
1 slice bread
1 qt broth made from stomachs of various animals especially pig or other
salt to taste
seasoning such as: 1 sprig oregano, ½ tsp cinnamon, ½ tsp nutmeg, ½ tsp white pepper
grease from cooking fowl

Preparation

If preparing roast geese, put it in a pot. Cut two finger lengths of neck close to the shoulders, the
claws and the wings. Mix partially cooked garlic and raisins with salt and stuff the geese with them. When stuffed let the geese stand in an earthenware cooking pot to become firm. Put it on a skewer and cook.
This can be served as a soup 
or chicken with gravy
Photo by: Lord-Williams

For the sauce: finely chop the livers of the fowl top being prepared with bread soaked in ¼ c broth. When done, add the rest of the broth made with the stomach of various animals especially pig or other broth. Strain it to make the paste thinner. Save the grease that comes out of the geese or hens while cooking for boiling the sauce. When the sauce boils taste for salt and pour into bowls. Boil the grease saved from the cooking fowl and bring it to a boil; add this to the bowls instead of oil and mix it into the sauce. This sauce may be served as soup or sauce to accompany all kinds of fowl.





SENT SOVÍ















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