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Friday, December 30, 2016

OSO WITH A 13TH CENTURY SWEET WHITE SESAME MERINGUE COOKY RECIPE

honey

(he is unique - waiting for 500 years for his meringue cooky!)
Photo from: bocagehoney
bear. Pliny in Book VIII, Chapter XXXVI says: In Spain it is correctly thought that bear brains are noxious and accommodating for witchcraft; thus the heads of all dead bears are burned with the brains in them. It was thought that if the marrow was drunk it would transmit rabies from the bear.

Geronimo de Huerta relates ingenious and ferocious legends about bears filled with desires for revenge, its passion for women and its hate for men, why it likes honey and why it does not flee from beehives and its dream to reduce winter to 40 days. Further, he reflects that the bear and man are the only beings that eat meat, greens and fruits for their sweetness, tenderness and flavor. Putting the blood or fat of the bear in a glass under the bed attracts mosquitoes and they die.

Dissolving Honey in Boiling Water
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Aristotle said that he believed the bear’s vessels grow the whole time it is in its’ cave. It is said that bear blood makes abscesses grow and its fat is a remedy against baldness. Villena thought the meat was better salted than fresh. It is still cured in Leon.

[Laza. 2002:164-165; Trapiello. 1994:134; and Villena/Calero. 2002:31b]

A SESAME MERINQUE COOKIES ADAPTED FROM MARIN'S TRANSLATION OF IBN RASĪN'S FADLAT SECCIÓN 9. CH 2, 4. DULCE DE AJONJOLI BLANCO, p 283

Ingredients

1 lb  or 1 ⅓ c honey[1]
4 egg white[2]
1 c hulled and lightly toasted sesame seeds

Interestingly Unique Cookie
Toffee-like and Crunchy!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Pour honey into a saucepan over low heat. Heat until liquified. Remove from heat stirring constantly until cool.

Beat egg whites until stiff. Pour them over cool honey. Fold the mixture together with a wooden spoon. Add sesame seeds and continue folding the mixture until blended. 

Preheat oven to 300º F/150ºC

Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper.

Drop the mixture by teaspoonfuls on the cookie sheet.

Bake 25 mintutes until lightly browned. 


[1]  The original recipe calls for 1 ratl (arrelde in Spanish) which equals 4 lbs. See blog titled “arrelde” published November 15, 2011.  
[2]  The original recipe calls for 5 egg whites per 4 lbs of honey or 4 if the honey is white. 

MARIN'S TRANSLATION OF IBN RASĪN'S FADLAT 
SECCIÓN 9. CH 2, 4. DULCE DE AJONJOLI BLANCO, p 283


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Wednesday, December 28, 2016

ORUGA WITH 14TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR ROCKET SAUCE

Rocket Leaves
Photo by: Lord-Williams
oruca, ruqueta, alhuceña, alhuceña, OCat hurugua, horugua L. Eruca vesicaria, Fr. julienne, Eng. arugula, rocket, roquette, rugula and rucola. Thisherb not in use in Spain today except in rural areas. It is an annual native of Asia and southern Europe. It was cultivated in all medieval gardens on the Mediterranean. It seems to have been unknown in France and England during the Middle Ages.

The plant has eight stems. Some grow to two feet in height. Rocket is cylindrical and covered with rough hairs. The leaves are long and divided length wise into various segments. The flowers are in the form of a cross with four white pedals having black stripes. Small cylindrical sheaths contain tiny round yellow seeds. The plant contains jamba oil, used initially for making pickles. After six months the oil loses its acrid taste and then is used in cooking. It is also used as a lubricant and for burning.

Rocket is a diuretic used to relieve stomach upsets; rubbed on skin causes local reddening. Like mustard, rocket was thought to be hot and excited one to perform lechery.

Young leaves, having a sharp hot taste, were eaten in salads and used to season stews. The salads were well liked in the 15th C.  Sent Soví calls for a sweet and sour rocket sauce for cold marinated lamb served in the summer and for roast beef or pork. The sauce consists of boiling rocket in water, honey and vinegar. Nola gives the same recipe adding saffron and ginger in one recipe and wine and saffron in another. See panecillo.

[Anón/Grewe. 1982:XXXXI:84-85:CLXIII:177-178:CLXIIII:178-179 etc; Font. Plantas. 1999: 157:257; Nola. 1989:xlix-5:
xlix-6; Villena/Calero. 2002:23a; and Villena/Navarro. 1879:272]         

ROCKET SAUCE ADAPTED FROM GREW’S EDITION OF ANÓN SENT SOVÍ #CLXIII QUI PARLA CON SE FFA HORUGUA, pp 177-178

Ingredients

A Tricky Sauce for the Vinegar
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 bunch or ¾ lb rocket
¼ c + vinegar to taste
½ tsp saffron
1 tsp ginger
¼  tsp cloves
½ tsp cinnamon
¼ tsp white pepper
2 tbsp fruit syrup or sugar (optional)

Preparation

Wash rocket. Grind it in a food processor. Add enough vinegar to make a paste. Scald with boiling water.[1] Remove excess water. Grind it again a food processor until very fine.
Mash saffron and dilute with water used to scald rocket. Scrap ginger. Grind cloves and cinnamon. Add them with pepper to the sauce. Add vinegar to taste. Add fruit syrup or sugar for those with a delicate constitution or to make a sweet and sour flavor. Bring to a boil and serve.

Serve with roast chicken, pork, beef, veal or salted fish.


[1] The original recipe calls for scalding it nine times, which seems exaggerated.

SENT SOVÍ #CLXIII QUI PARLA CON SE FFA HORUGUA, pp 177-178




Monday, December 26, 2016

ORTIGAS - NETTLES WITH APICIUS RECIPE FOR NETTLE OMELETE

Using Gloves to Cut off Thorns
Photo by: Lord-Williams
hortiga, OCast fortiga, hortiga, L. Urtiga dioica, Fr. Ortie dioïque or grande ortie, Eng. big-sting nettle or stinging nettle. It was the symbol of courage and envy. Jane Shore, mistress of Edward IV of England, is said to have been “as strong as nettle”. In flower language it means, “one is spiteful.” This plant reached its height in popularity with the Romans who cultivated it around army camps.

Nettle is mentioned in the Old Testament of the Bible (Isa 55:13) as this sting plant with hairy leaves that flourished in fallow fields of Palestine but it does not appear in Sephardi recipes. Avicenna cited it in powders, syrups, pills and ointments. It is claimed that in Andalusian cookery there is a nettle soup recipe passed down from the Romans. Nettle soups were drunk until the 12 C. but later lost their popularity. They were considered better than asparagus, especially in spring when at their best.

Frying the Omlete
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Romans consumed nettles to disintoxicate the liver after over-eating. They brought this custom to Spain where, over the centuries, it has been used in batters and soups. The seeds are added to cakes for flavor. The leaves are eaten, cooked or steamed, similar to spinach. The juice is used in infusions good for diabetes and in shampoos to prevent loose of hair. It is an antiseptic and stimulant. Previously it was used as an antigen and detergent. It has been thought that the juice from the leaves stops gangrene and cancer. Today it is drunk as an infusion to relieve chronic bladder irritation and as a pain-reliever on painful or arthritic joints. Nettle has been used to help nursing mothers produce milk.

Unfortunately, there are no recipes for nettles in the medieval Spanish texts consulted but Apicius explains that they should be collected on sunny days during the zodiac sigh of Aries and used against ills. .

[Apicius/Flower. 1958:III:XVII:86-87:IV:III:36:110-111; ES: Gutiérrez. Jun 1, 98; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:118; Villena/Calero. 2002:23a; and Villena/Navarro. 1879:44]

NETTLES OMLETE ADAPTED FROM FLOWER'S TRANSLATION OF APICIUS' IV:III:36 PATINA URTICARUM CALIDA ET FRIGIDA, pp 110-111

Ingredients[1]

Simple and Delicious
Photo by: Lord-Williams
½ lb nettles[2]

½  tsp white pepper[3]
½  c liquamen[4]
¼  c oil[5]
4 eggs

Garnish 

white pepper

Preparation

Wash nettles and strain. Dry them on a board and chop. Add pepper and liquamen. Heat oil in a frying pan.  When boiling, add nettles. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool.  

Select another frying pan and grease. Beat eggs and add them to the pan. Stir while pouring in the nettle mixture. Remove from heat and cover. When the eggs have coagulated, sprinkle with ground pepper and serve hot or cold.


[1] The quantities have been adjusted and divided in half or more  to make an omelette for 4 persons.
[2] Spinach was used instead as nettles were not in season at the time of this publication.
[3] The recipe states 10 "scruples." One scruple is 20 grams or almost two cups.
[4] The recipe calls for 2 cyathi of liquimen. One cyathus equals one ladle. One vegetable bullion cube dissolved in 1 c broth was used instead.
[5]The recipe calls for 6 oz oil which is 2 cups of olive oil

APICIUS' IV:III:36 PATINA URTICARUM CALIDA ET FRIGIDA, p 110


FLOWER'S TRANSLATION INTO ENGLISH, p 111




Friday, December 23, 2016

ORO WITH 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR A FATTY POTTAGE

gold nugget
Photo by: nara white Owl
1. gold. Small nuggets or pulverized gold was added to food to help rejuvenate women, to provide more energy to elderly, or to make hair grow and produce new teeth. It was standard fare to pulverize bits of precious stones and consume them for their health qualities. 2. egg yolk. 3. a type of creamy-yellowish lard. [Nola. 1989:xxix-2; and Sas. 1976:448]

A FATTY POTTAGE ADAPTED FROM NOLA'S 
xxix-2 POTAJE DE GRASA

Ingredients

½ lb grated cheese
Golden Egg Yolk for a Golden Pudding
Photo by: Lord-Williams
½ lb grated bread
6 egg yolks
1 qt broth with grease
3 cloves
½ tsp white pepper
½ tsp saffron
1/3 sugar or honey
a few drops of vinegar

Preparation
A Fat Pottage the Color of Gold
Photo by: Lord-Williams
for 6 persons

Mix cheese and breadcrumbs. Beat egg yolks well.

For six dishes, take a half pound of grated cheese with half of a grated hard bread. Mix all and add six egg yolks beaten very well.

Bring broth to a boil. Grind three cloves with pepper and saffron and add them to the broth. Add sugar or honey. Sprinkle with a few drops of vinegar and bring to a boil. Simmer for 5 minutes and turn off heat. 

Beat the bread and cheese mixture with the egg yolks and add this little by little to the broth, stirring continuously with a large wooden spoon so that it does not curdle. When the mixture thickens, serve. 







NOLA'S xxix-2 POTAJE DE GRASA







Wednesday, December 21, 2016

ORELLETES WITH RECIPE FOR VALENCIAN EARLIKE FRITTERS

Rolling out Dough for Fritters
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1. fritter simply consisting of dough with anise that looks like ears when fried. It was a Hispano-Arab recipe originally. Today it continues to be a popular dessert in Valencia and Catalonia. 2. Cat. individual deep, hemispherical soup bowl or large cup for other liquids with small handles. Normally they were glazed earthenware or wooden. See escudilla. [Benavides-Barajas. Nueva-Clásica. 1995:272; and Lladonosa. Cocina. 1984:63]


EARLIKE FRITTERS ADAPTED THE BARONESS OF ALMISERAT 'S 
                                             RECIPE FOR ORELLETES 

Frying Fritters
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Ingredients
for 8 persons
1 lb flour
½ c  sugar
1 envelope yeast
¼ c anise liquor
lemon zest from 1 lemon

½ c milk
oil for frying


Garnish
1 tbsp powdered sugar

Preparation


Delicious!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Mix the dry ingredients. Add anise and lemon zest wth anís. Stir constantly while drizzling milk into the mixture little by little. 

Divide into portions the size of a small egg. Roll them out with a rolling pin to make round pieces about ½" in diameter.

Heat olive oil in a pan and add dough. Fry until golden brown. Remove and place on paper towels to absorb excess oil. Place them on a platter and sprinkle with sugar.