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Wednesday, March 30, 2016

MANZANA WITH AN INCREDIBLE 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR APPLE STEW WITH CHICKPEAS, EGGPLANT AND PURSLANE

An Aroma that 'Fortifies the Heart and Brain'
Photo by Lord-Williams
OCast mançana, poma, Sp Heb mansána, L. Pyrus malus, Ar. tuffāh, Fr. pomme, Eng  apple. The apple region in Spain is in Asturias. In Leon popular ones are from Algadefe, while the Bierzo region prides itself with golden apples, known since Roman times. The Monastery of Carracedo has always been noted for those produced on the trees within the precincts.

Azanzoar claimed it was the most beneficial of fruits for its aroma fortified the heart and the brain. It is beneficial for the weak although it is more useful for those suffering from lack of stimulation. 

Nevertheless Avenzoar thought apples extremely harmful if eaten but he says no fruit is eatable. Apples, according to him, produce gases in the veins and muscular pain and probably consumption because once digested; the blood generated cannot circulate and decomposes gases left stuck in the veins. It is unlikely that these gases become powerful but they reach the blood and consumption is inevitable except in some cases. It does not matter, Avenzoar continues, if the apple is mature or green, if it has begun to mature or half matured, the result is very harmful and for that he did not recommend eating them. In reference to the juice and the dregs, he maintained that  they are harmful and not recommended for the sick or the healthy except for youths in good health with exceptional strength for they can digest them without causing any harm.

Villena instructs that the apple should be cut like the pear, lengthwise in four parts. They should not be peeled if small and mature. Big apples should be cut into slices lengthwise and then cut into chunks like the peach. If cooked, Villena advises to peel them and to cut them with a fruit fork to avoid touching them. The heart and seeds should not be eaten. See pero and perero.

[Aguilera. 2002:95; ES: “50 things.” Mar 17, 04; Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:73; Nola. 1989:xvi-1; Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:162; Sas 493; and Villena/Calero. 2002:23a:42b:43b]

APPLE PURÉE ADAPTED FROM HUICI'S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN, AL-ANDALUS #192 HECHURA DE MANZANAS, p 123 

Ingredients[1]

A Gourmet Example of Color and Tastiness
in Medieval Cookery
Photo by Lord-Williams
1 c chickpeas
1 eggplant
4 sour apples
1 tbsp olive oil
salt to taste
1 tsp pepper
1 tbsp chopped mint
1 tbsp chopped celery leaves
1 tbsp rue
2 purslane stalks[2]
1 tsp thyme

Preparation

Soak chickpeas overnight.

Cut off stem and leaves of eggplant. Boil it until soft. Peel and chop.

Boil apples until soft. Macerate and strain them. Add oil, salt, pepper. Crush soaked chickpeas and add them to the apples. Bring the mixture to a boil and add mint, celery leaf, rue and stalks of purslane, and thyme and boiled eggplant. Put all this in a food processor and grind until pureed.

Pour the purée into a pot. Seal the lid of the pot with a paste made with water and flour. Cook 10 minutes or until done. Let sit for 10-15 minutes to enrich the flavor.

Ladle out the stew into bowls as a first course or use as garnish with meat.


[1] As the mixture of the ingredients were bland, the Medieval Spanish Chef added one chopped and fried onion, 1 mashed and fried garlic clove and ½ tsp ground cinnamon. This was ground in the food processor with the rest of the ingredients prior to finishing the cooking in a sealed pot
[2] As purslane was not available spinach was used as a substitute.


HUICI'S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS




MANUTERGIOS, -IAS MEDIEVAL RITUALS FOR DINERS' TO CLEAN HANDS


Hemp Cloth Surnap
Photo by: Lord-Williams






manutergios, -ias, (10th C. ‘for clean hands’), frazalegas (14th C), OLeon fazelelias sábanos (10th C. Leonese, burlap or hemp cloth), Eng. surnap, hand towel for diners, used to dry hands after washing them before and after each meal. It was not used during the meal. See salva de los aguamaniles, toallas and toallas de manjar.  [Alonso Luengo. 1994:47; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:42; Pacho.1994:149; Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:130:146:193 etc; and Sass. 1975:29]

Monday, March 28, 2016

MANTEQUILLA DE ALMENDRAS WITH SUPER RECIPE FOR ALMOND BUTTER TURNOVERS

Homemade Almond Butter
Photo by: Lord-Williams
MEng buttur of almonde mylke Eng. almond butter. It is made with crushed almonds, rosewater and sugar or honey. It was a tidbit, nibbled between meals. It was often eaten with violet blossoms. Culpepper expounded on its qualities saying it was convenient and wholesome and nutritious for students, “for it rejoiceth the heart and comforteth the brain, and qualifieth the heat of the liver.” During Lent the English made a pastry called
cuskynoles or kuskenole, with almond butter filling.

Note, there is no complaint recorded from Spanish foreign queens during the Middle Ages about the lack of butter from cow’s milk. Perhaps this is because they had almond butter, which is healthier than peanut butter.

[ES: Herbal. Mar 29, 05; ES: Renfrow. Jun 16, 04; Henisch 1976:42; and Hieatt. “The Anglo.” 1986:825]

THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF’S CREATION OF ALMOND BUTTER TURNOVERS

Placing Almond Butter on Dough for Turnovers
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

Filling:

1 c almonds
olive oil for frying
¼ c rosewater
¼ c sugar

Pastry:

3 c flour

½ c butter
½ c ice water
2 eggs
grease for baking sheet

Preparation

Blanch and peel almonds. Heat enough olive oil in a frying pan to cover the almonds. When hot add the peeled almonds. Cook until lightly toasted. 
A Delightful Surprise for the Whole Family
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Put almonds with the other ingredients for the filling in a food processor and grind on high until almond butter is formed.

Beat all the ingredients for the pastry, except for one egg, until blended. Knead until smooth, about 5 minutes.

PREHEAT OVEN TO 400ºF/200ºC

Roll out the dough on a smooth surface and cut into 2 ½ inch circles. Place 1 tbsp of filling on each circle. Fold over and paint the edges with one egg beaten. Seal the edges with a fork.

Grease a baking pan and place the pastries on it. Bake 45 minutes or until browned.


Friday, March 25, 2016

MANTEQUILLA WITH 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR NUTTY HONEY BUTTER SAUCE TO DIE FOR!

Butter
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ar, samneh, samn, Eng. 1. butter. northern provinces, such as Soria and León, always, have been famous for their butters but in the Middle Ages, it was considered the poor man’s food.

In Madrid and provinces south of it, butter was not commonly sold in shops from the time that there were enough olive groves in the 13th C., due to Arab influence, until the 20th C when it became available in supermarkets.

2. clarified lard. Lard from the lamb’s tail was a delicacy in the Middle Ages. See mantgeca fresca. [Alonso Luengo. 1994:40; and ES: Sorrenti. Apr 4, 02]


NUTTY HONEY BUTTER SAUCE/ANOTHER CALLED GILDED ADAPTED FROM ANÓN AL-ANALUS # 205 OTRO QUE SE LLAMA DORADA


Ingredients

Dunkin Bread  in Nutty Honey Butter Sauce
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 lb honey
½ lb clarified butter
½ tsp saffron
½ tsp pepper
½  tsp cinnamon
2 eggs
¼ c almonds
¼ c walnuts
¼ c pistachios

Preparation

Pour honey into a pot. Add clarified butter, saffron, pepper and cinnamon. Heat and bring to a boil. Slight beat eggs. Add the almonds, walnuts and pistachios. to the eggs and stir them before adding them to the pot. Stir until mixed and the sauce thickens. Remove from heat and serve as a sauce for desserts, a sweet sauce for meat or for dunkin bread. 

HUICI'S TRANSLATION OF AL-ANDALUS #205





Wednesday, March 23, 2016

MANTELES WITH 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR CHICKEN (OR DUCK)

Faces of Ancient Europe
AELST, Wm. van
OFr. naprtie (fr nappe a cloth), MEng naperousnes (cloth ?) napery, draper, Eng tablecloth, linen for a table; white linen cloth in general. The use of them was first documented by the Romans. The Hispano Arabs used fine leather ones instead of cloth as the Christians who had them made of linen or cotton used especially for banquets.

Except in when on war campaigns, they were prescribed in Spanish etiquette books for the upper classes. Instructions for layering them on tables in medieval manors, in England and Spain are complicated but precise. Three layers of clothes were used in late medieval times in England. The two upper ones almost touched the ground. They were overlapped as linen as they were only 63” wide. As tablecloths were a sign of good manners, they were used for picnics.

Babees’ Book clearly tells eaters not to wipe their noses with them. They were considered so valuable that they were mentioned in wills. They were not used by lower classes or for informal family dinners. [Arjona. 1983:27; Brett. 1968:56; ES: “Gastronomia.” May 2, 03; Henisch. 1976:148:151; Bryene. 1931:122; and Rickert. 1966:xxxi]


ABBASID CHICKEN, ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL –ANDALUS #59 GALLINA “ABBĀSIYA,” pp 44-45

1 hen[1]
stuffing
            entrails
            ¼ c walnuts
            ¼ c almonds
            7 tsp pepper, thyme, cumin, cloves, lavender, saffron and coriander
            2 tbsp oil
            2 tbsp strong vinegar
            1 tsp murri
Stuffed Duck on Spit
Photo by: Lord-Williams
3 tbsp vinegar
1 tbsp murri
2 tbsp olive oil
½ tsp white pepper
1 tsp coriander
1 tsp mashed and dissolved saffron
1 tso cinnamon
1 tsp thyme
1 tbsp rue
1 tsp ginger
4 garlic cloves  mashed
¼ c almonds
¼ c walnuts
1 qt chicken broth

Stuffed Duck Ready for Carving
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Clean a hen or other fowl.

Place all the ingredients for the stuffing in a food processor and grind them together. Stuff the hen between the skin and meat. Put the remainder in the interior and sew it shut.

Put the hen on a spit and roast it until brown on all sides. Put the remaining ingredients in a pot. Bring to a boil. Add the hen and let it soak in the broth. When cooked, garnish it with five eggs. Turn off the heat and leave on the hearth stone until it cools. Remove stuffing, carve an serve.

This can also be done ina frying pan with the sauce in the oven. Either way is notable.  



[1] Strangely, there are not Spanish Medieval texts containing recipes for duck. As it is obvious ducks were eaten, duck was used in this recipe instead of hen.

ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #56 HECHURA DE BUCHÓN NOTABLE
Instrucciones para preparar el relleno -
Instructions for preparing stuffing


ANÓN AL-ANDALUS