Entradas populares

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

MORENA ONLY FOR FISH LOVERS - 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR MORAY EEL


Moray Eel
Photo from: Mellie Smith
1. sheaf; pile of straw.

2. L. Muraenidae helena, Eng. moray eel. This is a two and a half foot long dark red cylinder shaped fish with yellow spots. From the first half of its loin is a thin fin that rounds the tail and extends to the anus. Where the head begins are two round holes, which expel water swallowed. It lays its eggs between July and September. It is found in the eastern Atlantic between the British Islands and Senegal and in the Mediterranean.

During the Middle Ages, the fish was kept alive until cooked as it was thought more flavorable. It was killed by knocking its head against something hard like a stone. In his recipe “Morena en pan” (Conger Eel Pie), Nola warns to take care as its bite is poisonous. He recommends whipping it to death because that way the bones go down the tail. If scalding it to death, this does not happen.

Villena states that it should be carved lengthwise like the conger. See congrio.
3. loaf of brown bread, made with finely sifted flour. [Corbera. 1998:76; Fernández Muñiz. 1994:187:188; Nola. 1989:lxii-1; Villena/Brown. 1984:172; and Villena/Calero. 2002:23a:38a]

MORAY EEL IN A POT ADAPTED FROM NOLA'S lxii-2 MORENA EN CAZUELA

Ingredients

1 moray eel
2 lbs salt
a drizzle of olive oil

Gently Removing the Skin
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Stuffing:

½ c almonds
½ c raisins
20 gr pine kernels
2 tbsp basil
1 tbsp dill
½ tsp white pepper
a drizzle of olive oil

Garnish

Parsley or other herb on hand

Preparation

Nola instructs that if the moray eel is alive, be careful as its bite is poisonous. Whip it to death. That way the bones descend to the tail; if scalding it, this does not happen. Cooking destroys the poison.
As the Medieval Spanish Chef did not share Nola’s experience, first the fish was cleaned and washed. Then a bed of salt was poured into a roasting pan. Drizzle with olive oil and lay the cleaned fish on top.

Spread salt over the top of the fish and drizzle with olive oil.


Prepare the stuffing. Fill the gut with it and sew it closed. If there is left over stuffing but it in a cloth bag. Tie it and put it on the bottom of the roasting pan to catch the drippings from the fish. Put the eel on top of this.

PREHEAT OVEN TO 350 ºF/175ºC


Roast 1 hour or until done. Remove all the salt. If necessary wash it off.

Remove the tail and the head. Discard or safe for fish broth.

Eel Surrounded by Nut and Herb Stuffing
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Remove skin by pushing the skin away from the meat using one’s fingers going from the tail to the head. Gently turn the fish over and do the same on the other side.

Carefully open the fish in the middle of the bottom side and fold the meat from there to upper side into the bottom of the roasting pan.

Remove the stuffing from the gut and set aside. Remove the stuffing from the back and set aside with the stuffing from the inside of the fish.

Pull the bones up, starting at the tail, lifting them up to pull them out hole. Remove and discard.

Replace the upper side on top of the bottom side. Carefully put the fish on a platter. Surround it with the stuffing.

If necessary, reheat in microwave. Garnish with parsley or other herb on hand. Serve warm.


NOLA'S lxii-2















Monday, August 29, 2016

MORCÓN WITH RECIPE FOR BLOOD PUDDING TURNOVERS

Spreading Blood Pudding Mixture
on Half of a Turnover
Photo by: Lord-Williams
blood pudding. [Pers. Memories. Slaughter Mostoles 2000:2001:2003]

THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF’S RECIPE FOR BLOOD PUDDING TURNOVERS

Ingredients

Dough for 12 turnovers, about 5” in diameter

The filling:
1 leek
1 garlic clove
¼ lb soft cheese
2 eggs
¼ lb blood pudding or sausage
½ tsp cumin
½ tsp thyme
olive oil for frying

Preparation

A Perfect Way to End a Day!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Prepare turnover dough. Cut into circles and set aside.

Mince leek. Heat frying pan with 1 tbsp olive oil and sautée. Mash garlic clove and add to the leek when almost translucent.

Mash cheese and mix with one egg. Mix with cumin and thyme.

If using blood sausage, remove encasing. Lightly fry.

Mix all the above ingredients and spoon over turnovers.

Beat the second egg and paint the edges of the turnover dough with this. Seal shut pressing down on the edges with a fork. Prick the tops of the pastries for air holes.

Heat enough oil for deep frying. When boiling hot add turnovers one at a time. Fry until golden brown.  Serve piping hot.









Friday, August 26, 2016

MORCILLERA WITH BLOOD PUDDING, CARAMELIZED ONIONS AND FRIED EGGS

Frying Blood Sausage and Onion
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1. n. mixture for blood sausages. 2. v. the act of stuffing intestines with a blood sausage mixture.  See blog titled encañar published February 26, 2014. [Pers. Memories. Slaughter Mostoles 2000:2001:2003]

THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF’S RECIPE FOR BLOOD PUDDING WITH CARAMELIZED ONIONS AND EGGS


Ingredients – 1 per person

1 blood sausage[1]   
olive oil for frying
1 onion
1 tbsp sherry
1 egg per person
salt to taste

Simply Delicious!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Slice sausage. Fry in 2 tbsp oil. Cover to keep warm and set aside.

Slice onion. Heat a frying pan. Add 2 tbsp oil. Sautée onion until translucent. Add sherry. Mix well and let bubble until caramelized. Cover to keep warm and set aside.

Heat another frying pan with 1 c oil. When boiling hot, add eggs and fry to a crisp.

Place sausage on a platter. Cover with caramelized onion and top with one fried egg per person. Serve immediately.


[1] As this was considered peasant food, it is difficult to find written recipes for blood pudding but this concoction is logical.

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

MORCILLA WITH A "BLACK AND WHITE" SANDWICH WITH FRENCH BREAD

2002 - The Slaughter Man and Inés
Catching Blood from Pig's Artery
with Red Bucket for Blood Sausage
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCast morcón (fr mondongo), morsilla, morzilla, muresillo, musçilaginosa, OCat murcies (a stuffing), Leon morciella, Ar. mirkás (merguez sausage made with meat from a lamb’s leg or shoulder and murri naqi’ instead of blood), Port. morcella, Eng. blood sausage or black pudding. Basically, it consists of blood (collected when the pig’s throat or aorta is slit), seasoned pork from the belly or the meat between the shoulder and the elbow, fat from the chin and caul. The Leonese add onion, while those from Burgos use rice. In León, it can consist of blood and cured lamb suet. Each region and household has its particular recipe.

Some priests, beside Pablo Santa María, 1350-1435 (a Jew who converted to Christianity), thought that Genesis IX: iii-iv, prohibited consumption of animals’ blood and they believed that it caused melancholy and illnesses. They even forbid Maragato cocido (boiled stew) as “heretical food” as it contains blood sausage.

Carvers, after slicing meat, let the blood run out to prevent offending any guests. Others, like Baltasar de Alcazar, author of “Cena jocose” (jocular dinner), sang his praises for this sausage. 

Immediately, upon killing the pig, a woman, holding a pail, jumps in front of the pig to catch the blood spurting out of the gash. After a bit, another woman replaces her with another bucket. The first one quickly stirs what is in her bucket with a stick. Then she goes back to the pig while the second woman stirs the blood in her pail. They alternate in that fashion until the pig stops bleeding and the blood has been stirred sufficiently to prevent coagulation. In Estremadura, salt is not added, but in León it is.

Black Blood Sausage and White Sausage
Ready to be topped and devoured
So yummy!!!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Sheep’s blood does not coagulate. A pan is set under its chin while the slaughter man works on preparing other parts of the body after the kill. See morciellas and mondonga.
[Alonso Luengo. 1994:38; Anón/Grewe. 1982:IIII:65:f Anón/Grewe. 1982:IIII:65:ftn 3; Anón/Huici.1966:15-16; Ares. “Comidas.” 1994:108; Dialecto. 1947:270; Espasa. 1988:54:STA CUBICIA:190; Pers. Memories. Slaughter Mostoles 2000:2001:2003 and Chile 2002; Trapiello. 1994:139; Villena/Brown. 1984:173; and Villena/Navarro. 1879:66:271]

No recipe is needed for the simplicity of preparing sausage. Normally it is fried. In Valencia there are side walk stands surrounded by tables for customers ordering their specialty of “blanco y nergros,” i.e. one white sausage fried with one blood sausage served in a bread roll. Nothing can be more delicious!