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Wednesday, November 30, 2016

PALETA WITH 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR LAMB


Shoulder of lamb (uncooked)
Photo from: Gary Lum
paletilla, 1.shoulder-blade; shoulder of meat such as lamb. 2. meat removed from the shoulder-blades for pork sausages. 3. palette.  4. spatula, kitchen implement with a flat disc attached to a long handle; fire-shovel; iron ladle. 5. chine of pork or pork cutlets, pork or other meat from the spine between the shoulders. 

[Ares. “Comidas.”1994:85:117:118; ES: Carroll-Mann. Nola-2. Jun 6, 01:54; Pers. Memories. Slaughters Mostoles. 2000:2001:2003; and Serradilla. 1993:39]

LAMB, ANOTHER DISH ADAPTED FROM MARIN’S TRANSLATION OF IBN RAZIN’S FADALAT SEC 2 CAP 3 #5. OTRO PLATO, pg 179

Ingredients

A Recipe for Juicy Meat
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 lamb shoulder blade
salt to taste
½ tsp white pepper
1 tsp coriander
2 tbsp vinegar
½ tbsp murri
1 tbsp olive oil
oil for frying
5 raw eggs
1 tbsp flour
¼ c breadcrumbs


Preparation


Select a lamb shoulder blade. Slice it into strips. Put it into a pot with seasoning vinegar and 1 tbsp oil. When the meat is half done remove it and fry it in oil in an iron or glazed earthenware pot.

< mso-bidi-font-weight: normal;">Beat eggs with flour and breadcrumbs. Add it to the pot with the meat and juices. Let the eggs cook. Pour the contents into a serving platter and enjoy.

MARIN’S TRANSLATION OF IBN RAZIN’S FADALAT









Monday, November 28, 2016

PALAMIDA WITH TUNA TURNOVERS

Skipkack tuna
(Kasai Rinkai Suizokuen, Tokyo
Photo from t-mizo
palomida, atún de altura, bonito de altura, bonito de veintre rayado, listado, Cat pelamide, boníto de ventra raillat,  L. Katsuwonus pelamis, Eng. skipjack tuna, striped bellied bonito, striped bellied tunny. It is a dark purplish blue fish, with a silvery belly and lower sides. It has four to six longitudinal dark bands. It is about 108 cm long and weighs between 32.5-34.5 kilos. It is a migrating fish found in the Pacific and the Atlantic living in tropical and warm temperate waters but not in the Black Sea. It swims in schools and is caught with a hock-and-line or with nets.

Raw skipjack is red. When cooked it turns brown. As it is a continuous swimmer, its muscles are rich in energy and it is more flavorful than other tunas. To reduce the strength of the flavor, it can be soaked for an hour before cooking. When cooked the firmness increases. It is, therefore, recommended to undercook it. It can be grilled, baked or fried. See bonito. [Corbera. 1998:229; ES: FIGIS. 2002; ES: Species. Jun 17, 03; Nola. 1989:lx-3: lx-4:lxi-1; and Nola/Pérez. 1994:204]

SKIPJACK TUNA TURNOVERS ADAPTED FROM NOLA lx-3 PALAMIDA EN PAN[1]
damacija moja inspiracija
Photo from: 
...friška odma sa koče,,,

Ingredients

1 lb of a tunafish
¼ tsp white pepper
1 tbsp ginger
salt to taste
½ tsp mashed and dissolved saffron (optional)

The Medieval Spanish Chef’s additions.
1 small onion chopped
2 apple chopped
2 egg slightly beaten
12 turnovers
1 slightly beaten egg
1 tbsp olive oil

Preparation
Tuna Lovers' Delight
Photo: by: Lord-Williams

PREHEAT OVEN TO 400ºF/200ºC

Scale and clean tuna. Cut it into rounds four fingers thick. Grind pepper, ginger, salt and saffron if desired. Sprinkle the fish with this seasoning.

Make turnovers large enough to hold a round of tuna. Place one round of tuna in each turnover. Paint the edges of the dough with egg and seal it shut. Paint each turnover with olive oil. Cook 10 minutes on each side or until done.

Nola advises that the best time to eat tuna fish is in the month of March.




[1] For more of Nola’s tuna recipes see blog titled juncia olorosa published August 3, 2015 and jurel published August 7, 2015

NOLA lx-3




Friday, November 25, 2016

PALA WITH 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR PIGEON LEGS AND BREAST

Thigh and leg of a Chicken in Sauce
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1. stick, pole. 2. tooth. 3. Villena uses the word to mean the thigh of birds but actually in livestock and fowl it is the shoulder. [Ares. “Comidas.” 1994:124; Serradilla. 1993:142; Villena/Calero. 2002:40:25a; and Villena/Navarro. 1879:273]

PIGEON[1] LEGS AND BREAST ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL ANDALUS #228 ŶUMILYA DE PIERNAS Y PECHUGAS DE PICHÒN, p 138-139

Ingredients
For 1 person but if using chicken for 2-4 persons

¼ c olive oil
2 pigeon legs
1 pigeon breast
1 onion
1 tbsp murri
2 tbsp vinegar
A Very Taste Recipe for Fowl
Photo by: Lord-Williams
salt to taste
1 tsp coriander seed
½ tsp caraway
¼ tsp white pepper
6 sprigs of thyme
2 raw eggs
4 egg yolks

Garnish
½ tsp white pepper
1 sprig of thyme

Preparation

Heat olive oil. Brown legs and breast in it. When browned remove meat from pan. Fry onion until translucent.

Return the chicken, add the rest of the ingredients, except the eggs. Cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and gently boil uncovered for 20 minutes or until done and the sauce is thick.

Beat raw eggs and cover the meat. Dot the dish with egg yolks. Garnish with pepper and decorate the yolks with thyme leaves and serve.  



[1] Chicken was used as pigeon was not available.

ANÓN AL ANDALUS #228


Wednesday, November 23, 2016

PAJERERO WITH SAUCE FOR GEESE ETC


Roadrunner box trap
Photo from: Sam
OCast paxarero, Eng. n. bird catcher, bird fancier, very large bird cage. During medieval times, only nobility was permitted to practice the art of hunting, especially large game, on their estates. Peasant did hunt small game on the Iberian peninsula as the Archpriest of Hita points out. He relates that peasant hunters planted hemp to later make rope and nets from it to catch flightless or terrestrial birds, such as peacocks, ostriches, francolins, roadrunners and certain species of ducks, pigeons and doves.

adj. merry, gay.

[Anón/Grewe: 1979:XXV:76-77: CXXXIII:155: CXXXVIII:158 etc; Anón/Huici. 1965: 2:19; 30:30-31;52:41etc; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:224-225; Nola. 1989:xxx-2:xxx-3:xl-1 etc and Ruíz/Saínz.1986:752:139]

For some recipes see: blog titled cortar published August 9, 2013 which gives a 13th century recipe for roasted hare and blog titled dornillo published January 14, 2015


Garlic and Raisin Stuffing
Photo by: Lord-Williams
SAUCE FOR GEESE, CAPONS, HENS, PIGEONS AND PHEASANTS  ADAPTED FROM ANÓN/GREWE SENT SOVÍ, CXXXIII QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FFER EN ALCELS MENUTS ALIDEM, p 155

Ingredients

1 head of garlic
½ c raisins
1 bird such a goose, capon, hen, pigeon or a pheasant
salt to taste

for the sauce:
2 chicken livers
1 slice bread
1 qt broth made from stomachs of various animals especially pig or other
salt to taste
seasoning such as: 1 sprig oregano, ½ tsp cinnamon, ½ tsp nutmeg, ½ tsp white pepper
grease from cooking fowl

Preparation

If preparing roast geese, put it in a pot. Cut two finger lengths of neck close to the shoulders, the
claws and the wings. Mix partially cooked garlic and raisins with salt and stuff the geese with them. When stuffed let the geese stand in an earthenware cooking pot to become firm. Put it on a skewer and cook.
This can be served as a soup 
or chicken with gravy
Photo by: Lord-Williams

For the sauce: finely chop the livers of the fowl top being prepared with bread soaked in ¼ c broth. When done, add the rest of the broth made with the stomach of various animals especially pig or other broth. Strain it to make the paste thinner. Save the grease that comes out of the geese or hens while cooking for boiling the sauce. When the sauce boils taste for salt and pour into bowls. Boil the grease saved from the cooking fowl and bring it to a boil; add this to the bowls instead of oil and mix it into the sauce. This sauce may be served as soup or sauce to accompany all kinds of fowl.





SENT SOVÍ