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Wednesday, April 26, 2017

PIEDRAS GUIJAS WITH PARSLEY SAUCE RECIPE FROM THE 14TH CENTURY



Pebbles
Photo from: Tristan Martin
small smooth, shiny pebbles found in river banks and on the shores. In cookery, they had mysterious powers. Heated, they were put into the mortar to warm sauce.  This took on a unique flavor that was not obtained another way in spite of the fact that the pebbles did not transmit any odor or flavor or leave any particles or residue. [ES: Medieval Spanish Chef. “gallo cresta.” Oct 8, 14 and “perejil.” Apr 15, 17; Nola. 1989:l-4: and Nola/Pérez. 1994:206]

LLADONOSA’S VERSION OF PARSLEY SAUCE IN LA COCINA MEDIEVAL. SALSA VERDE, p 87 ADAPTED FROM ANÓN SENT SOVÍ #CLXVI, QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FFER JURVERT. pp 179-180[1]


A Unique Way
to Serve a Sauce!
Photo by:
Lord-Williams
Ingredients
For 6 or more

A few sprigs of parsley
2 slices toasted bread, crust removed
1 c vinegar
¼ tsp white pepper
 c honey
salt to taste

Preparation

Mash leaves from a few sprigs of parsley in a mortar with a pestle. Add the bread soaked in vinegar and pepper. Mix well. Add honey. Mix all again. If the sauce is too thick, more vinegar can be added. Taste for salt. The sauce looks like it is finished but the original recipe recommends that it should be heated with one or two pebbles from the sea until they are red hot. Add the sauce and let cool.

Then the sauce is actually finished. The parsley and pepper help to produce a sweet and sour flavor.

I don’t see that the use of the pebbles makes much difference in the end.

It is served in a “gresal” (grail, cup or goblet shaped glass), the word that we find at the end of the recipe.



[1] See Medieval Spanish Chef “cañarejo apio.” Aug 2, 12,  for version adapted directly from Sent Soví #CLXVI which calls for mint and marjoram as well as parsley, plus garlic and walnuts a opposed to Lladonosa’s version below.

LLADONOSA’S VERSION OF PARSELY SAUCE IN
LA COCINA MEDIEVAL. SALSA VERDE, p 87


ANÓN SENT SOVÍ
#CLXVI, QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FFER JURVERT. pp 179-180






Monday, April 24, 2017

PICORILLO WITH A MOORISH WEDDING DISH FROM THE 13TH CENTURY

A Spicy Picorillo with Saffron and Vinegar
Photo by: Lord-Williams
pungency, spiciness, sharpness, acidity, bitterness, strong flavor. A combination of spices, herbs and other flavors to enhance meat dishes. [ES: Anon/Perry. Sep 5 02:20:106; Hieatt. Ordiance. 1988:47:146; Perry. “Notes.” 2001:254]


A WEDDING DISH ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS, #14. PLATO A LA VINAGRETTA, p 21-22

Ingredients

Step 1:
1 lb chopped beef or lamb

a picorillo of:
 salt to taste
½ tsp white pepper
1 tsp coriander seeds bruised in a mortar
½ tsp cumin
Cooking Lamb in Picorillo
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 tsp saffron mashed and dissolved in a little egg white (below)
2 garlic cloves peeled and mashed
¼ c almonds peeled and mashed in a mortar
¼ c oil
¼ c vinegar

Step 2:

a mixture of:

2 beaten eggs
6 egg whites
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tbsp lavender
1 tsp saffron mashed and diluted

 Garnish:
6 egg yolks

Preparation

A Colorful Dish for a Festive Occasion
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Mix lamb with the picorillo. Cover with oil and vinegar. Heat and bring to a boil. Reduce and simmer 30 minutes or until meat is tender.

Coat it with beaten eggs and egg whites mixed with cinnamon and lavender colored with saffron. Turn off heat.

Garnish with egg yolks and leave on the hearth until it thickens and the broth evaporates and sauce becomes clear after it thickens.

This dish lasts many days without changing or spoiling; in the the Algarve, it is called "wedding food" and it is one of the seven dishes cited among those served in banquets in Cordoba and Seville.


Friday, April 21, 2017

PICOR WITH PEASANT'S DISH OF LAMB


Vinegar for Sharpness
Photo by: Lord-Williams
agudeza, OCast agudez, Eng. sharpness. [Germán. 1994:195; and Villena/Calero. 2002:41b]

A PEASANT'S DISH OF LAMB ADAPTED FROM HUICI'S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS, #332 HECHURA DE LA CAMPESINA COMPLETA, p 185

Ingredients

2 lbs lamb
2 eggplants
½ tsp Pepper
2 tbsp cilantro
1 tbsp lanvender
1 tbsp murri
1 tsp cumin
2 tsp cinnamon
½ c almonds
2 slices of day old bread
1 tsp saffron mashed
¼ c vinegar 
2 garlic cloves
¼ c chopped almonds
6 egg yolks
oil for frying and covering
1 hard boiled egg

Preparation

Grind half the lamb. Slice the eggplants in half. Rub with coarse salt and turn out on a towel to let them bleed for about 20 minutes. Boil one eggplant. Remove from heat and cool. Remove skin. Squeeze out excess water and mash. Mix this with the ground lamb. Add half the spices such as pepper, cilantro, lavender, murri, cumin, cinnamon and chopped almonds. Make meatballs[1].

Worth the Effort!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Chop the other eggplant and fry in oil. Take the other half of the lamb and chop. Mix it with the other half of the spices: pepper, cilantro, saffron, cinnamon, cumin, lavender, vinegar (to make it sharp) and a garlic clove mashed. Fry this in oil, until it is nearly ready. Remove half the meat. Then add the chopped eggplant and layer this with half meatball/eggplant mixture. Top this with the rest of the meat and the rest of the meatballs.

Sprinkle with the ¼ c chopped almonds, egg yolks and cover with a thin layer oil; put in the oven and leave until dried and browned on top. Before serving, sprinkle with with a mashed hard boiled egg.


[1] If too soft roll in flour and refrigerate the night before finishing the dish.

HUICI'S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS, 
#332 HECHURA DE LA CAMPESINA COMPLETA, p 185


Wednesday, April 19, 2017

PICADO, PRUEBA WITH RECIPES FOR CHORIZO AND BLOOD SAUSAGE

Fried  blood sausage stuffing and choriera
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Eng a sample of  choriera (chorizo stuffing) or morcillera (blood sausage stuffing). Also, it is called (de) matanza (of the slaughter). It is fried and tasted for possible seasoning changes before stuffing the intestinal skins. [Serradilla. 1993:100: 146:147]

CHORIZO, THE MEDIEVAL SPANISH CHEF'S RECIPE
For 4 servings      

Ingredients
  
1 lb pork butt ground       
1 tsp coarse sea salt       
1 tsp white pepper 
1 tsp macerated murri[1]        
¼ c white wine[2]
2 garlic cloves mashed     
1 tsp nutmeg       
1 tbsp chopped cilantro       
1 tsp cinnamon 
1 tsp dried lavender mashed
1 tbsp flour      
washed sausage casings
string for tying 
¼ c virgin olive oil   

HONEY BLOOD SAUSAGE, THE MEDIEVAL MANUEL QUITIAN'S  CONCOCTION

Ingredients

Tying Sausage Links
Photo from: Lord-Williams
2 tbsp almonds
1 tbsp olive oil, plus oil for frying bread
2 blood sausages (optional)
1 tbsp pine kernels
½ tsp cloves
½ tsp cinnamon
2 egg yolks
3 tbsps honey
1 tbsp suet
8 thin slices of bread

Preparation

Boil almonds in water. Remove from heat and peel. Chop coarsely and set aside.

Heat olive oil in a frying pan. Remove sausage meat from casing and sautée. Add spices and nuts.  When toasted mix with egg yolks and add honey. Taste for sweetness. Add more honey if desired. Add suet and mix well.

Store refrigerated until ready to eat.

Thinly slice small pieces of bread and toast them.

At the same time warm the blood sausage mixture in a frying pan or microwave. When warm spread on bread and serve warm as hors d'oervres or dessert.

Boil almonds in water. Remove from heat and peel. Chop coarsely and set aside.

Black Blood Sausage and White Sausage
Ready to be topped and devoured
So yummy!!!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Heat olive oil in a frying pan. Remove sausage meat from casing and sautée. Add spices and nuts.  When toasted mix with egg yolks and add honey. Taste for sweetness. Add more honey if desired. Add suet and mix well.

Store refrigerated until ready to eat.

Thinly slice small pieces of bread and toast them.

At the same time warm the blood sausage mixture in a frying pan or microwave. When warm spread on bread and serve warm as hors d'oervres or dessert.
_____________________________________
[1] See blog titled Almorí macerado published on August 29, 2012 for recipe.

[2] Paprika and cayenne pepper are not included as they are New World products. Wine is used instead.


Monday, April 17, 2017

PICADA WITH A SAVORY RECIPE FOR CHICKEN IN ALMOND SAUCE FROM THE 14TH CENTURY


Pounding a "Picada"
Photo by: Lord-Williams
(fr. picar, to crush), sauce, paté or blend pounded in a mortar obtained from mashing various ingredients such as garlic, almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, herbs and spices, crackers, breadcrumbs and/or livers from different animals, olive oil or other liquid to thicken a dish. Sent Soví explains that this is a basic element in Catalan cooking. This is added five to ten minutes before the end of cooking to thicken dishes and to provide more flavor.

Food processors are not used as they grind foods. Ingredients for Picadas must be crushed together using a mortar and pestle.

Both Sent Soví and Nola provide numerous recipes calling for a picada. Some of these, previously published in the Medieval Spanish Chef blog are found in the following blogs with recipes from Sent Soví or Nola:

Blog title: Melva, with Sent Soví recipe CIIII – Fried Fish in Escabeche, published June 1, 2016.
Blog title: Frejurate with Sent Soví recipe CXXVI  - Noumble Pottage, published August 27, 2014
Blog title: Bullabesa with Sent Soví recipe CXXXXVI - Sautéing White Lobster or Cuttlefish or Calamari, published May 14, 2012.
Blog title: Asador with Nola recipe xxxix-1 - Dobladura de Ternera, published May 14, 2012
Blog title: Champiñones with Nola recipe lii-3 - Trufa en Salsa published  December 3, 2013.
Blog title: Pedaso with Nola recipe lxvi-2 - Squid And Cuttlefish Pottage 
published February 6, 2017.

[Anón. Sent Soví. 1979: CIIII:133-134; CXXVI:141:CXXXXVI:156-157 etc; Lladonosa. 1984:132:136:159 etc; and Nola. 1989: xxxix-1: lii-3: lxvi-2 etc]  

ANOTHER MIRRAUSTE, HALF ROASTED CHICKEN IN ALMOND SAUCE 
ADAPTED FROM ANÓN SENT SOVÍ 
#LV QUI PARLA EN ALTRA MANERA CON SE FFA MIG-RAUST. Pp 99-100[1]

Ingredients

Absolutely Delicious
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 chicken (about 3 lb)
1 tbsp olive oil
1 chicken liver
½ c ground almonds
1 c chicken broth
½ tsp ginger
¼ tsp cinnamon
freshly ground pepper
¼ c sugar
1 tbsp verjuice

Preparation

Joint the chicken in the usual way and cook in oil over low heat for about 20 minutes turning from time to time, or until the chicken is almost cooked but not browned. Transfer to a clean pan or casserole. Meanwhile gently cook the liver in the same oil turning to cook all sides, until cooked through.

In a food processor blend together almonds, chicken broth, liver, spices, sugar and verjuice. Strain this sauce over chicken, pushing down on the residue on the sieve to extract a much as possible. Simmer over gentle heat for 15-20 minutes stirring and turning the chicken pieces occasionally. The sauce should reduce somewhat and thicken.

Check seasoning before serving. t may be necessary to add a little salt or to correct the sweet/sour balance by adding sugar or verjuice.


[1] See blog titled churrasco published January 14, 2012 for a different version of this recipe.

ANÓN SENT SOVÍ # LV QUI PARLA EN ALTRA MANERA CON SE FFA MIG-RAUST pp 99-100