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Wednesday, January 4, 2017

OVEJA WITH A 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR ROAST LAMB

Merino lamb
Photo from Bernard Spragg. NZ
OCast oueja, Gall ovella, Leon. ovella, ougüeia, ugüeya, uveya, Maragato (León) oveyaoubeua, oveia or doveia, Eng. sheep. During the Middle Ages, lamb was more commonly eaten than veal or beef as the cow was no bigger than a dog, which yielded much less meat than the lamb. 

The Spaniards were very popular for developing the merino lamb, which was developed by the Phoenicians, Greeks, Italians and Spanish but the Hispano-Arabs introduced an improved the breed between the 8th-13th C to produce the best wool of all varieties.

[Dialecto. 1947:282; 338; ES: Lord. mesta. 6/24/16: merino. 6/10/16; García Rey. 1934:117; Lord. Memories. n/d.: Sas. 1976:451; and Villena/Calero. 2002:22b]

ROAST LAMB IN ITS SKIN ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION INTO SPANISH OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS, #28 CORDERO ASADO CON PIEL, p 29

Rolling Boneless LEg of Lamb in Stuffing Mixture
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

1 lamb[1]
entails
aromatic spices, such as 1 tsp each of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves and 
½tsp white pepper
1 tbsp oil
1 tsp murri
3 eggs or 6 egg yolks
aromatic herbs such as 1 tbsp ea of thyme, rosemary, oregano and mint

Garnish:
1 tbsp salt to taste
1 tsp freshly ground white pepper
2 tsp ground cinnamon

Preparation

Carving the Roast
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Select a fat lamb. Remove the entails. Put the lamb in a pot and pour boiling water over it. Remove wool. 

Clean and stuff with aromatic spices, oil and murri.[2] Beat a egg with aromatic herbs an add this to stuffing. Sew up the stomach, the neck and any other openings to prevent grease from coming out. 

PREHEAT OVEN TO 400ºF/200ºC

Place it in a tannur oven [3] and roast until done. Remove from heat and carve with a sharp knife. Sprinkle with ground salt, pepper and cinnamon.
_______________________________
[1] 2 ½ boneless leg of lamb was used as a whole lamb was not available.
[2] Unfortunately. the lamb came prepared and stuffed in a net. All the stuffing, spices and herbs, were mixed together with the blood from the cut of lamb. This was heated until a paste was formed. The paste was spread out on aluminium foil and the roast was placed on top. Then the foil was rolled to cover the roast with the stuffing. 
[3] A conventional oven was used as a tannur was not available. 

HUICI’S TRANSLATION INTO SPANISH OF 
ANÓN AL-ANDALUS, #28 CORDERO ASADO CON PIEL, p 29



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