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Monday, May 15, 2017

PESCADO SECO Y SALADO WITH A CODFISH RECIPE


Secando bacalao
Photo from: Mikeldesigns
pescado seco y salado, Gr. tarikhos (dried up), Ar. tirrīkh, Eng. dried and salted fish. During the Middle Ages, it was very popular in inland towns and cities as the consumption fish was frequently prohibited by the Roman Catholic Church especially during Lent because it is the breeding season of animals and due to the lack of refrigeration. Even today dried and salted codfish and commonly sold in Spain and Portugal as it is cheaper than fresh fish.

TO SALT FISH

Drying Cod in Sea Salt
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

1 lb filetes of codfish
1 lb sea salt

Preparation

Make a bed of salt in a casserole dish with half the salt. Place filetes on top. Cover with the remaining salt. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate 48 hours.  Remove from refrigerator. Brush off extra salt. Pat dry and store until ready to use.

When ready to use wash off salt and soak overnight. Rinse well before using.

CODFISH[1] THE SECOND RECIPE FROM THE BARONESS OF ALMISERAT

Ingredients for four

1 lb codfish
2 garlic cloves mashed
2 egg yolks
2 tbsp cream[2]

Garnish
seasoning such as cinnamon, parsley and tarragon[3]
4 slices of bread
oil for frying

Creamed Cod in a Shell with Fried Pita Bread
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Boil meat in water. Remove from water and and strain water. Shred the meat.

Mix the codfish with 2 slightly beaten egg yolks 2 tbsp cream and put it in a casserole. Slowly heat, stirring constantly. Do not let the mixture boil. Add just enough olive oil for the codfish to absorb all of it. Cook until done.

Place this in a serving dish and garnish with toasted bread fried in oil. Actually, this would be good in as vol au vent filling!


[1] This recipe is from the archives of the Baroness of Almiserat. Although not dated, it is obvious that it is after 1475 when the first printing press appeared in Zaragoza, Spain as the collection is printed and is not a handwritten manuscript.  Further, the recipe has two methods for preparing codfish, the first of which includes tomato. This indicates that the methods are posterior to the incorporation of the American tomato into European cooking but it is possible that the above recipe, the second method, was carried down from medieval recipes as all the ingredients existed prior to the discovery of America.
[2] The author added ½ cup instead of 2 tbsp.
[3] The authors addition.

THE ALMISERAT RECIPE:



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