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Wednesday, June 7, 2017

PIEDRAS GUIJAS WITH PARSLEY SAUCE RECIPE FROM THE 14TH CENTURY



Pebbles
Photo from: Tristan Martin
small smooth, shiny pebbles found in river banks and on the shores. In cookery, they had mysterious powers. Heated, they were put into the mortar to warm sauce.  This took on a unique flavor that was not obtained another way in spite of the fact that the pebbles did not transmit any odor or flavor or leave any particles or residue. [ES: Medieval Spanish Chef. “gallo cresta.” Oct 8, 14 and “perejil.” Apr 15, 17; Nola. 1989:l-4: and Nola/Pérez. 1994:206]

LLADONOSA’S VERSION OF PARSLEY SAUCE IN LA COCINA MEDIEVAL. SALSA VERDE, p 87 ADAPTED FROM ANÓN SENT SOVÍ #CLXVI, QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FFER JURVERT. pp 179-180[1]


A Unique Way
to Serve a Sauce!
Photo by:
Lord-Williams
Ingredients
For 6 or more

A few sprigs of parsley
2 slices toasted bread, crust removed
1 c vinegar
¼ tsp white pepper
 c honey
salt to taste

Preparation

Mash leaves from a few sprigs of parsley in a mortar with a pestle. Add the bread soaked in vinegar and pepper. Mix well. Add honey. Mix all again. If the sauce is too thick, more vinegar can be added. Taste for salt. The sauce looks like it is finished but the original recipe recommends that it should be heated with one or two pebbles from the sea until they are red hot. Add the sauce and let cool.

Then the sauce is actually finished. The parsley and pepper help to produce a sweet and sour flavor.

I don’t see that the use of the pebbles makes much difference in the end.

It is served in a “gresal” (grail, cup or goblet shaped glass), the word that we find at the end of the recipe.



[1] See Medieval Spanish Chef “cañarejo apio.” Aug 2, 12,  for version adapted directly from Sent Soví #CLXVI which calls for mint and marjoram as well as parsley, plus garlic and walnuts a opposed to Lladonosa’s version below.

LLADONOSA’S VERSION OF PARSELY SAUCE IN
LA COCINA MEDIEVAL. SALSA VERDE, p 87


ANÓN SENT SOVÍ
#CLXVI, QUI PARLA CON SA DEU FFER JURVERT. pp 179-180






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