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Monday, June 19, 2017

PIMIENTA DE LOS NEGROS DE ÁFRICA WITH A 14TH CENTURY SAUCE FOR DEER

Xylopia aethiopica (Annonaceae)
© W. Barthlott, Lotus-Salvinia.de, (Ivory Coast)
pimienta etiope, L. Xylopia aethiopica (Xylopia is Gr. xýlon pikrón condensed meaning"bitter wood" aethiopica refers to the origin of the tree in Ethiopia [though most of it grows in Ghana]),Ar. fulful, fulful al Sudūn, Fr. poivre des noirs d’Afrique, Piment noir de Guinée, Kili, Graines de Selim, Poivre de Sénégal, Eng. Africian grains of Selim, African pepper, Negro pepper, Moor pepper, Kani pepper, kimba pepper and Senegal pepper.

Xylopia aethiopica fruits en vente au marché
Photo from: Scamperdale
It was used as a condiment in Africa and in Europe as a substitute for long pepper to a large extent before it became imported regularly from India in the 16th C and later from America. Many cookbooks written before 1650 could be referring to this pepper, not long pepper, see pimiento largo.

The part of the plant used looks like small twisted dark brown bean-pods, which grow in clusters. Inside are five to eight kidney shaped seeds some 5 mm in length. The hull is aromatic, but not the seed. This is pungent and slightly bitter tasting like a mixture of cubeb, pepper and nutmeg. It does not seem to be sold today. [ES: Katzer. Aug 29, 2005]

SAUCE FOR DEER ADAPTED FROM ANÓN SENT SOVÍ
#62 SALSA DE CERVO, p 228

Ingredients

¼ tsp mixed spices without saffron[1]

1 toasted bread
½ c vinegar
1 c fruit syrup
1 c broth

Devine with Lamb or Pork
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Grind or shave spices and mix them together.

Soak bread in ¼ c vinegar.

Make a fruit syrup by mashing 4 c of fruit in a food processor. Add ½ c sugar and ½ c water. If wishing to enhance the flavor, add ½ tsp anise. Bring to a boil. Simmer uncovered 15 minutes or until it thickens.

Add the soaked bread with the rest of the ingredients. Blend well and pour this into a sauce pan. Bring to a boil, remove from heat and serve in bowls[2].


[1] The title has also been translated as "Pepper Sauce." "Pepper" was used broadly in the Middle Ages to mean spices in general. In this case pepper is recommended with other spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and/or cloves.
[2] Although the recipe is titled “sauce,” by serving it in bowls could indicate that this is a soup or broth but as the title infers, the Medieval Spanish Chef recommends it to accompany deer or other game. If not available, it could be served with lamb or pork.


ANÓN SENT SOVÍ #62 SALSA DE CERVO, p 228




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