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Monday, July 17, 2017

PISTADERO WITH 13TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR MUSTARD

A Pestle in a Mortar
Photo by: Lord-Williams
majadero, OCast pestello, Eng pestle. [Sánchez-Albornoz. 2000:130]

HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDLAUS NOTES ABOUT MUSTARD/LA MOSTAZA[1], p 88:

Mustard: it is advisable to remove the outer shell or husks as this is bitter. For this reason, old mustard seeds should be washed in hot water before making mustard paste to reinforce the sharpness without being bitter.

HOW IT IS MADE ADAPTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANON AL-ANDALUS #130 CÓMO SE HACE, pp 88-90

¼  c mustard seed
1 c almonds
1 tsp murri[2]


Mashing Mustard Seed in a with
a Stone Pestle and Mortar
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Take fresh mustard seeds and mash them in a stone or wood mortar until crushed; wash them in hot water to rid of bitterness and strain; put them back into the mortar and crush them hard. Sprinkle with murri little by little. Then squeeze them in a piece of thick cloth or a rough woolen apron; then pound until disintegrated, and squeeze until fine like talbîna[3]
.
Then mash peeled sweet almonds until the texture is like dough. Then squeeze this into the mustard and mix until it looses its bitterness and becomes white and sweet.
It will take on the cool and sweet flavor of the almonds; this is the benefit of the almonds and the advantage of the şināb[4]. When made, this pastes it used to accompany roasts and other heavy, fatty foods.


[1] Mustard as we know it today is nothing like that of the Middle Ages which was coarsely ground in a mortar with a pestle. In 1720 Mrs. Clemens of Durham took George I of England mustard ground and sifted through a cloth.  George I, king of England, was so delighted with it that he bought it.  From that time on the milling and sifting of mustard seeds were refined up to the beginning of the 20th century, which today is the  “mustard” we know.
[2] Perry says sharp vinegar.
[3] Huici says this is derived from lavan, milk; Perry says dissolved starch.
[4] Perry states: this is mustard as we know it, ground mustard seed made into a condiment with grape juice or vinegar; it was common in Andalusian cooking but not known in the Levant, where mustard was always a spice, never a condiment.


HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANON AL-ANDALUS

“LA MOSTAZA” Y  #130 CÓMO SE HACE, pp 88-90



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