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Friday, September 29, 2017

PUERROS - LEEKS


Gently Frying Heaps  of Leeks
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCat poros, Cat porros, L. Allium porrum, Eng leeks. In Ancient Rome and Greece they were thought to have aphrodisiac properties. Apicius’ recipes for leeks including boiling in water and serving with oil, liquamen and wine; boiling in a sauce and serving beans; covering them with cabbage leaves and cooking them in the coals; and cooking them in oil with olives.

Leeks were included in numerous Spanish and English recipes throughout the Middle Ages. Liber Cure and Harleian 1016 provide a puréed leek recipe with other vegetables and fish or shellfish cooked in almond milk. Sent Sovi and Nola give recipes for leek potages enriched with almonds, cinnamon and sugar and served cold. During bread famines leek flour was used.

Avenzoar said the leek is harmful and fills the head with residual elements. As it is useless he recommended that it not be eaten. See porrada.


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[Anón/Grewe. 1982:LXXXXV:126-127:ftn 2:LXXXXVI:127-128:ftn 1:CLXXXX:199:ftn 1 etc; Apicius/Flower. 1958:III:X:1:2:3::81-82 etc; Austin. 1964:91; Castro. Alimentación. 1996: 205; ES: Lord-Willliams. ES: “Celemín.” Oct 12, ’12: “Cocer a Medias.” Aug, 3, ’13; and “Cuervo.” Oct 22, ’13; Liber/Renfrow. Sep 23, 03:110:44:116:47; Ibn Zuhr/García Sánchez. 1992:92; Nola. 1989: xxvii-2:xxvii-3: and xxxvii-3; and Sas. 1976:514]

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

PUERCOS MONTESES - WILD PIGS


Removing the hooves
Photo by: Lord-Williams
wild pigs. Villena relates that the best part is the meat on the shoulder blades. The meat is skinned and cut into stripes, half cooked and left unseasoned. Later it is eaten after boiling and roasting if desired. It is cut into four parts. Then rump, legs, ribs and breasts are carved in the same manner as the cow. 

The hooves are removed by cutting the joint nearest the hoof and pillng the hoof back breaking the tendos. Then the hoof is chopped off and saved. 
With the head, they are   are eaten boiled and skinned. These are cut like veal. 

The kidneys and loins are carved into small pieces. Uneatable parts, such as the hair, are made into brushes and fangs are made into jewelry. 3. boars. See carner, cerdo and lechon. [ES: Lord-Williams. “Cochinillo.” Mar 13, ’13: “Comida de Encarga.”  Aug 22, 13:”Costillas.” Aug 26, ’13 etc.; Sanz. 1967: 51; Sas. 1976:514; and Villena/Calero. 2002:31b-32a35b]

Monday, September 25, 2017

PUERCOS CASEROS


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Preparing to remove tongue
cutting neck from outside in
Photo by: Lord-Williams
puercos caseros, young, skinny pigs (not a herd of) destined to be fattened and slaughtered for human consumption. As all parts of the pig are used by man for consumption or other purposes, Villena gives a detailed description of each part of the body and how to carve them. For example, after singeing the head, the upper jaw bone is separated from the lower jaw. In this way the tongue can be removed whole. 

Then the head is split into two and the brains are extracted. The ears are cut off at the base. Then the eyes are removed completely. 

The meat on the face is carved into thin wide slices. Pieces are cut off around the nose that are neither meat nor bone. These parts are salted, eaten raw, boiled, baked or marinated. Villena further states that fresh pork from males is better that of females. 

[ES: Lord-Williams. “Alforjas.“ Jul 26, ’11:Cabeza de Cerdo.” My 31, ’12: Aprovechables. Oct 31, ’11 etc; Sanz. 1967: 51; Sas. 1976:514; and Villena/Calero. 2002:31b-32a35b]




Friday, September 22, 2017

PUERCOS - PIGS

A Pig Before the Slaughter
Photo by: Lord-Williams
pigs. Pork was eaten fresh or salted. The body is divided into cuts as mutton. The hooves were boiled and marinated. The internal organs were cut like those of mutton and stuffed in the same way as mutton. See cerdo.and untos. [ES: Lord-Williams. “Aguardiente.” Nov 4. ’10: “Carcavo.” Aug 15, ’12:”Casar Chorizos.” Sep 4, ’12 etc.; and Villena/Calero. 2002:22b:31b-32b]

The Medieval Spanish Chef has adapted various sauces for pork have been adapted from Grewe’s translation of Anón Sen Soví Nos. LXXXVIIII, CXXI, XXVIII etc.  Further, over two dozen recipes involving pork have been published by the Medieval Spanish Chef. Of recipes not cited above but that were noted for their excellence include:  MRSamper’s “Torta de chicharrones” (Crackling Cake Recipe) published in blog titled “Choricera”  published Dec 31, ’12; and the Medieval Spanish Chef’s recipe for chorizo published Feb 1, ’13. 

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

PUCHERO, -A, WITH A 14TH CENTURY CHICKEN RECIPE SO DELICIOUS THAT LICKING THE BOWL IS A MUST!

Puchero
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1. pot, cooking pot. It is smaller than an olla but has the same uses. 2. stew, a cocido consisting of meat, pork fat, chickpeas and legumes, with regional and household variations. In Spain a common expression is “Come and eat from the puchero with me.” 3. the daily bread (meaning food). See cocido and cocido maragato. [Anón. Sent Soví. LVIII:102-103:CLXXXIIII:190; Dialecto. 1947:299;
Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:145; and Sas. 1976:513 and Serradilla. 1993:147]

Recipes for “cocidos” published in this blog include: “Cocido madrileño” published  March 20, 2013; “Cocido de diario” published March 22, 2013 and “Cocido maragato" published March 25, 2013.

HENS BOILED IN A POT ADAPTED FROM SENT SOVÍ #LVIII QUE SE HABLA DE COMO SE CUECEN GALLINAS EN EL PUCHERO[1], pp 102-103

Pouring "Mujol" Sauce over Chicken
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Ingredients

1 hen[2]
100 gr. chunks of lard
spices and herbs[3]
2 chicken livers
1 qt “mujols” sauce[4]
1 c orange or lemon juice
a slice of bread for each serving

Preparation

Clean chicken. Remove guts and cut off claws,. Put tit in a pot stuffed with chunks of lard in the breast. Put the chicken in a pot. Cover with cold water. Season with spices and herbs. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about one hour, until tender and the liquid is reduced to a sauce.

 Lick the Bowl is a Must!
Its' so delicious!!!
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Mash the livers. Add one mashed garlic clove and a little liquid from the pot. Mix this with the “mujol” sauce. Add it to the pot and continue to simmer for about 20 minutes.

At the end of cooking time, add juice. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat.

Line individual soup bowls with sliced bread. Pour the soup over this and serve hot.


[1] Grewe translates this as olla while Gázquez uses the word puchero.
[2] Geese or other fowl can be used instead.
[3] Gázquez recommends salt, pepper, saffron, nutmeg and caraway.
[4] 1 qt almond milk, 1 tbsp ginger, 1 tsp saffron crushed, 2 hard boiled egg yolks mashed,1 c breadcrumbs, 1-2 tbsp honey. Mix these ingredients and put them in a pot. Bring to a boil and simmer.


                                  SENT SOVÍ #LVIII QUE SE HABLA DE COMO SE CUECEN 
GALLINAS EN EL PUCHERO[1], pp 102-103



Monday, September 18, 2017

PROHIBITIONS DE CULTURAS - CULTURAL PROHIBITIONS

Mock Cheese in White Sauce
Photo by: Lord-Williams
cultural prohibitions in worshiping of the three religions. During medieval Christians fast days were strictly observed. These included Fridays, Saturdays and Wednesdays, plus Lent and other days in the Christian calendar. This is due to the four humors. As they were thought to warm the body they were thought to diminish one’s ability to concentrate on spiritual values. Food prohibited included meat and its bi-products such as eggs, grease and dairy. 

The Jews had to wash his meat to insure all the blood was removed. The Berbers strictly forbid the consumption of alcoholic drinks. Muslims and Jews could not eat pork, rabbit, scaleless fish or shellfish. 

[Bolens. 1990:45; and Gitlitz. 1999:99]

See blog titled cebo published September 26, 2012 for a fish dish called
AMock Cheese For Lent adapted from Sent Soví Apè I #67 Formatgades, p 230


Wednesday, September 13, 2017

PRIMAL - SUCKLING PIG TO MELT IN YOUR MOUTH



A Roast to Melt in Your Mouth
The Medieval Spanish Chef is too poor for a whole pigglet
Photo by: Lord-Williams
primal, a suckling pig from six to nine months (69-103.5 k.) until reaches adult weight, 130- 170 k. at 18 months (the weaning age) when is slaughtered see cerdo. [Sanz. 1967:51]

See blog titled cochinillo published March 13, 2013 for Medieval Spanish Chef’s recipe for suckling pig to melt in your mouth.

Monday, September 11, 2017

PRIETO WITH A CHICKEN A WINE SAUCE RECIPE

uva prieto picudo
Photo from: la chaninguva
prieto picudoprieta, Leon preto, 1. firm (meat). 2. firm strong dark grapes used to produce wines from southern León; mature hard, sweet grapes. The wine made from them has a low alcohol content, oscillating between 12-13.5%. It is cherry colored with oregano tones. It has an intense, clean, natural and fruity aroma while the pungent state leaves the natural carbon on the tongue as a result of fermentation.  mature hard, sweet grapes. This wine is cherry colored with oregano tones. It has an intense, clean, natural and fruity aroma while the pungent state leaves the natural carbon on the tongue as a result of fermentation. [Ares. “Comidas.” 1994: 122; Garrote Alonso. 1947:298; Germán. 1994:195; Llamas. 1994:167; and Pacho. “Cocina.” 1994:144; Ruíz/Brey. 1965:386b:89 and Ruíz/Saíz. 1986:1281c:217]


A THICKEN CHICJEN DISH TRANSALTED FROM HUICI’S TRANSLATION OF ANÓN AL-ANDALUS #309 PLATO ESPESADO DE GALLINA, p 172


Ingredients

Slowly cooking chicken in wine sauce
Photo by: Lord-Williams
1 hen 
10 hard boiled eggs[1]
1 lb yeast[2] or 1 lb honey
¼ lb murri
¼ lb vinegar
¼ lb oil
2 dirhams or 1½ tsp pepper
1 dirham ¾  tsp cumin
2 sprigs thyme[3]
salt to taste
½ c flour

Garnish

1 tsp white pepper
½ c flour (optional)
4 egg whites

Chicken with Toasted Egg White
Photo by: Lord-Williams
Preparation

Select a fat hen and clean it. Put it in a pot with hard boiled eggs, shelled to look like meatballs, 1 lb yeast or 1 lb honey which is better and sweeter, ¼ lb each of: vinegar, oil and murri, 1 ½ tsp pepper, ¾ tsp cumin, 2 sprigs of thyme and salt to taste. Cover the pot with a lid and seal the lid was a paste made with water and flour. Leave an air hole. Break raw eggs over the hole. Then slowly cook over charcoal until done. Turn it out and sprinkle with pepper. It is very good covered with egg white mixed with flour.



[1] Perry omits this ingredient.  The Medieval Spanish Chef reduced it to one envelope or 10 grams.
[2] Perry says wine not yeast. In order to incorporate ½ l. dark red wine, it was added to 1 c honey.
[3] Perry says several.

Friday, September 8, 2017

POTE WITH 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR ONION POTTAGE

1. pot. Each region of Spain has its own pot or stew, pote or olla usually containing cooked chickpeas or fava beans, vegetables and meats. It is the forerunner of the fast food section by throwing everything into the same pot. It is said that no regional pot, however, is copied after another or descend from another, just as regional birds are not. 2. pottage. See pota. [Villar. 1994:182]

POTTAGE WHICH IS  PARRIOLA (AN ONION SAUCE) ADAPTED
FROM NOLA’S xxvii-3 POTAGE QUE SE DIZE PARRIOLA

Ingredients

Refreshingly Delicious
Photo by: Lord-Williams
2 onions
salt to taste
lard for frying
spices such as 1 tsp cinnamon, 
½  tsp nutmeg, 1 tbsp ginger
1 qt broth
4 egg yolks (optional)
2 chicken livers (optional)

Preparation

Finely chop onion on a cutting board. Sprinkle with ground salt and cold water. Squeeze the onions between two cutting boards to remove the viscosidad. Repeat this operation 3 or 4 times while chopping.

Then scald the onion in boiling water three or four times, squeezing out the viscosidad between scaldings.

Heat lard in a frying pan. Gently fry onions. Add spices and broth- Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and gently boil. Add egg yolks and mashed chicken livers optional.




                              NOLA’S XXVII-3 POTAGE QUE SE DIZE PARRIOLA







Wednesday, September 6, 2017

POTASA - SOAP MADE WITH POTASH

 zymrgst
Producing Potash
Ar. ushnān, Mid. Dutch potaschen, Eng. potash. A method of making potassium carbonate (K2). In medieval times it was made into soap used by dinners to wash their hands before and after meals. Seven Arab recipes for making it have been found in their manuscripts. They used soda from perfumed vegetable ash. By 800, Triana, a suburb of Seville, was the first a major producer of potash soap. 

Potash is produced by leaching ashes and sea plants and then evaporating the resulting solution in large pots. Sea plants were the primary ingredient in Triana. The reside left us called “pot ash”. This was boiled with
olive oil, soda and lime. It could be scented with almond oil, Rosemary and other herbs and spices. Triana was known for it boiling pots leaching the ashes.

In the photo above shows ashes being steeped from a wood fire to leach out caustic soda. The liquid runs into a cauldron where it is boiled to reduce water content. 

[ES: Flicker. Potash. Aug 4, 17; ES: Wikipedia.org/Potash; and Rodison. “Studies.” 2001:145]

Monday, September 4, 2017

POTAJE WITH 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR ONION POTTAGE

Fish Glop: Finale
Photo by: Lord-Williams
OCat pottatge, Cat potatge, Fr potage, Eng pottage, thick soup or stew, a mixture of various eatable substances. The word pottage comes from French meaning something prepared in the pot as opposed to food roasted or baked
The Old Testament, Genesis (25:21-34), indicates what one’s birthright is worth. Esau sold his (containing a double portion of his father’s inheritance) to Jacob, his younger twin brother, for a "mess of (lentil) pottage".

 Greeks introduced purees to Spain by the 8th C BC and the Romans furthered this dish to the point that thick soups were current in medieval Spain. During Lent, spinach with codfish pottage was frequently consumed in Spain. England followed this course through its own roots of pottages and soppes. [Anón/Grewe. 1982:61-62:ftn 3; Dialecto. 1947:298; Gázquez. Cocina. 2002:68 and ES: Gutiérrez. Jun 1, 98]

Numerous recipes for medieval pottages are provided by the Medieval Spanish Chef at this site.

ONION POTTAGE ADAPTED FROM NOLA’S xxvii-2 POTAJE QUE SE DICE PORRIOL

Ingredients

A Lovely Pottage with lots of tidbits
Photo by: Lord-Williams 
2 onions
salt to taste
100 gr chunks of bacon or sweet oil
1 c white wine
¼ c vinegar
½ tsp white pepper
chopped or whole partridges or another bird

Preparation

Peel and chop onions on a cutting board with a knife. While chopping, pour cold salted water over them several times, squeezing out the viscosidad each time. 

Then put them in a pot cover them with water.  Add bacon or oil. Bring to a boil. Add wine and vinegar. Bring to a boil and reduce heat. Gently boil five minutes or until the onions are translucent. Add pepper and salt to taste.

Taste the pottage. If too strong add more water and if necessary more salt. Then add partridges or an other bird and serve.

NOLA’S xxvii-2 POTAJE QUE SE DICE PORRIOL




Friday, September 1, 2017

POTA WITH 15TH CENTURY RECIPE FOR NOODLE POTTAGE

Image from page 525 of "Ohio archæological and
historical quarterly" (1887)
Photo from: Intern Archive Book Images
(probably from the derivative as pottage or potaje in Spanish), 1. round earthenware pot in which cocido (stew) and soups are made. It has three legs, with a small round neck and metal handle. It rests on side when not used. When Bin Laden’s first video appeared after September 11, 2001, the same type of pot, setting upright was shown in the background as if he were cooking up something more surprises for the world. See cocido, cocido maragato and pote. [Alonso, Martín. 1994:3:N:3366; and Benavides-Barajas. Nueva-Clásica. 1995:240] 

A NOODLE POTTAGE ADAPTED FROM
NOLA’S xxvii-1 POTAGE DE FIDEOS

Ingredients[1]

1 c noodles
1 qt chicken  or meat broth
1 tbsp sugar
2 c goat or ewe’s milk or ½ c almonds[2]

Garnish
1 tbsp sugar
1 tsp cinnamon
1 c grated cheese

Preparation
Yummy Noodles with a Sprig of Oregano
Photo by: Lord-Williams

Clean noodles, Put broth and the Medieval Spanish Chef’s additional ingredients in a pot. Bring to a boil. When the broth begins to boil, add noodles and sugar. When half cooked, remove broth and noodles.  Strain saving the broth.

If goat or ewes milk is available add it to the pot. If not make almond milk by grinding peeled almonds, adding the broth and straining it through a cheesecloth.

Bring the milk to a boil. Add noodles and vigorously boil until the noodles are al  diente. Remove the noodles from the milk and let sit 10 minutes.  Put noodles in individual soup bowls. Sprinkle with
 
Clean noodles and put chicken or meat broth into a clean pot. Bring to a boil and when it begins to boil add noodles with sugar. When half cooked, remove both and noodles from pot and add goat or ewe’’s milk or  in lieu thereof almond milk. Bring to a boil. Add noodles. Cook to al diente. Remove from liquid and let sit 10 minutes. Put noodles in soup, sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon.  Add milk and sprinkle grated cheese on top.


[1] As this recipe is insipid, the Medieval Spanish Chef added: 1 garlic clove, 1 bouillon cube, 1 tbsp fresh basil, 1 tbsp fresh oregano, 1 tbsp fresh parsley.
[2] Note that tomatoes did not exist in Europe at this time. Almond milk was commonly used in cooking.

NOLA’S xxvii-1 POTAGE DE FIDEOS